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1979 C&C 30 Mk I - 2QM15
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172 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Well... my offer has been accepted (79 C&C 30) and I'm just waiting for the surveyor to finish up the deal without any major findings... So be prepared to get bombarded with even more new-boat-owner questions... :confused:

So my first step is going to be to try and make her bullet proof from the toerail to the tip of the keel. The following is my currently planned to do list. Is there anything else I should be considering that will be difficult or impossible once it's in the water?

1. Inspect all the thru hull fittings & valves and replace any that aren't absolutely 100%
2. Replace old stuffing box packing with drip-less packing
3. Replace rudder post packing
4. Torque Keel bolts to spec and then grind & fill the "C&C smile"
5. Touch up existing bottom paint, which was done just last year
6. Peel off the current name, compound, wax, and buff from the scumline to the toerail

* - I'm thinking about calling her "Titan Uranus" :p :p :p
 

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1979 C&C 30 Mk I - 2QM15
Joined
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172 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
If you want the boat to be bullet-proof, immediately sell her again and buy a new one. Still won't be trouble free but at least someone else gets to pay for the repairs for a while.

Face it, when you buy a used boat you're buying one that someone else no longer wants. Mostly that is because they're tired of fixing stuff.

Sorry to be a bit negative but that is the reality of used boats and the on-going maintenance is the consequence of the money you save by buying used.
Gee... If boat ownership is so bleak and miserable, maybe I should just forget buying a boat, tie an anchor around my neck, and just dive off the dock now before the pain begins... :eek:

Look... I know it's not going to be perfect, I know it's an ongoing project to keep a boat in working order, and even more so when it's a used boat. But don't suck all the wind out of my sails already.

I just want to make an attempt to clear up the common locations where boats leak. I don't want the bilge pump running all summer for something I could have easily fixed while it was still on jack stands. And everything above the waterline I can start addressing on my evenings and weekends after I get it home since it'll just be floating 50' behind my back door.
 

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1979 C&C 30 Mk I - 2QM15
Joined
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172 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
You wont know for sure about item #1 until the boat goes in the water. Do a very careful inspection before you haul out next time. Then you will know which ones to work on when you are out.
Don't assume that I know what I'm doing... :p

So, from what I've read, repacking the stuffing box is a fairly simple task. Getting to it sounds like it's typically more of a challenge than the actual repacking process. But is there any reason why you "wouldn't" do that BEFORE you put it back in the water?

If I find out the stuffing box needs repacked AFTER I put it into the water, doesn't that turn into a $400 haul out just to get to the stuffing box again?
 
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