SailNet Community banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
987 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Beginner’s boat.
I am looking at either the porta bote in 14’ with a sail rig or the sail boat from west marine. I am leaning towards the porta bote since it can be carried on my car and can be used to fish from with a motor when not sailing. Will eventually take wife and two small kids’ day sailing. I am looking at spending about $3000 if anyone has better ideas. I have sailed on boats with the scouts but did not take the course.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
504 Posts
Porta Botes can be handy tenders for larger boats, but I don't think you'll get much enjoyment out of it as THE boat. It, and other boats with similar functions, is not going to sail well. If you insist on that sort of combination, you'll do better with a Fatty Knees, Cape Dory 10, or similar. Even those won't have great sailing characteristics.

You may want to entertain a small trailerable instead. A car-top sailboat that can actually sail, like a sunfish for instance, is not going to hold four people at once; two sure, not four.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,856 Posts
No! No! No! Start by looking for a real sailboat. Nothing that you have mentioned is suitable for 4 people. Those kids are going to get bigger. Think about some you can trailer that is light. Hopefully NC in you screen name refers to North Carolina. I am a big fan of lightings. Check out the link and stat doing a on line search. I think you find that a boat like these will better serve you for years to come.
Lightning Class 19' Lightning Class 19 - Sailboats for sale
 

·
AEOLUS II
Joined
·
2,937 Posts
Those boats may be decent tenders but they are not family daysailers.

I like the Flying Scot and O'day Daysailer.

These are easily handled sloop rig center board trailerables that can last a lifetime even if you get a bigger boat.

Unfortunately, even older models in decent shape may stretch your budget.

I've also gotten three adults on a Hobie Wave and it sailed quite pleasently!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
My suggestion...

If you can find one, is the Venture 17. I paid $400 for mine, magic tilt trailer included, and I'm loving it so far! Displacement is ~800 lbs, so my 4 cyl. S-10 can pull and launch it easily. Small cabin for storage and weekend trips, swing keel for easy launch and retrieval.

I know a lot of people knock MacGregor, but this boat seems to have lasted since 1971 with no major problems. The main is blown out, but functional, and she sails very well for a boat of her size. Pointing ability is excellent, sails easy to manage, quick to rig and de-rig at the ramp. All in all, a great 1st boat for the Admiral and I!
 

·
Anything-Sailing Founder
Joined
·
2,241 Posts
I'm going to echo the comments above. Looks for something a little more substantial. Maybe something like a Catalina 22 with a trailer. What area of NC are you in? I've seen several in my area for $3000 and under.
 

·
Just a Member
Joined
·
272 Posts
I would second a Flying Scot. I bought one when I was in your position and was very happy with. Even took my then 3 year-old son out on (with PFD, of course). Very stable, room for six, and easy to trailer. Thousands have been made, and you could probably find one for around $3,500-$4,000.
 

·
Unpaid Intern
Joined
·
992 Posts
Just jumping on the bandwagon here. Skip the Porta Bote and get a boat that sails better used. Flying Scots would be an excellent choice for a first sailboat, as others have said. I've also sailed the O'Day Daysailer and Lightnings. The latter is a little less of a boat to learn on, in my opinion, but excellent nonetheless.

I would think you can get one of these listed above for within your price range and with a trailer. They're light enough that they can be towed by a normal car...just need the trailer hitch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,647 Posts
A nice thing about the Scots (and the Lightnings) is that they are still an active One Design racing class, so you should be able to find good, cheap sails and plenty of online advice about rigging, maintaining and sailing the boats.
Like you say, tons of info at Flying Scot® Sailboats

I just don't see many come up for sail. I could be wrong though.

There is one listed on the sailnet classifieds a 1961 listed back in Nov '08 ....

http://www.sailnet.com/classifieds/showproduct.php?product=1932&sort=1&cat=6&page=1
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,173 Posts
Can't speak for your locale but in the West the Lido 14 has been the primary sail training boat for 40-50 years (I even had one when young) available in all prices and vintages. Easily towed, beachable, lots of parts available and there are racing fleets in a lot of places so you can continue to enjoy it after you learn the basics. My neighbor has an O'day and they are similar.
Lido 14 Sailboat Photo Gallery
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
987 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thank all of you who have posted. I will be doing more research on the different boats that you have mentioned. I will have to see if I can find some people to join here in Charlotte to get my feet wet with.
Thanks,
NCsailing
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top