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Any thoughts on this boat as a coastal cruiser in the Pac. Northwest. Mostly day sailing but some two or three day cruises with a short crew of two or three but sailing parties for a day with 6 to 8 on board.

Thanks
 

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The first series is normally for buoy racing but can be used as you describe. I just took a look on yachtworld and looks like they are asking around 100k for the circa 2000 models. My first observation is the main sheet traveler across the whole cockpit and the huge wheel... important for racing but not for comfort or parties. But believe me, it can be done! Long deep fin keel and rudder, nice.... but what else can you buy for 110k?
 

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It's a very rewarding boat to sail, responsive and quick. It would be a great BC boat esp in summer.. but it also responds well reefed in a breeze. We have friends that have been cruising/island hopping between Grenada and Barbuda for 10 years now on a B 36.7.

Storage is lacking, but it doesn't sound like you're planning any month long trips, and in any event in the PNW there's always somewhere to shop and stock up.

We've done over a thousand miles with them down south... fast and fun but yet we managed two weeks with up to 6 aboard no problem, many times. It would be pretty high on my list if it was within budget though my wife would still rather do the Catalina route....
 

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I'm with Faster. A great boat for what you propose. Especially if you are willing to give up some creature comforts for sailing performance. Assume the deep keel isn't an issue in the PNW. There is a shoal keel version but not many around.
 

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I have used one for teaching coastal cruising. I quite liked it. It will sleep five in separate berths. In light air it moves well.

The galley is adequate. Nice chart table.

Downsides

There is no real double berths. The V berth is quite cramped for two, the aft double has one person sleeping under the the cockpit.

The large racing wheel combined with a cockpit traveller and the backstay adjuster make transom access virtually impossible. There is no gate so you have to climb on board at the shrouds. It has quite a bit of freeboard.

The head is a bit small and can be a little hard to access.

The top shelves in saloon are quirky. Stuff can fall off if you open the cupboard.

The holding tank is a bit small. The pump out is under the v-berth.

There is no cockpit table.

Will post more when it comes to mind.
 

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I have used one for teaching coastal cruising. I quite liked it. It will sleep five in separate berths. ....
There is no real double berths. .
.
Interesting comments, Jack.. We were on a (rare) tiller version, French built and purchased new in Guadaloupe. The twin aft cabins are twins exc some ventilation is available through the lazarette for the port cabin. Without the wheel the centerline bulkhead between the two aft cabins is in fact on center.. I still had to tuck myself somewhat under the cockpit sole, but I'm sure it's less confining than what you described with the wheel version. We had no problem sleeping aft, and we are neither of us petite. The owners are smallish people and the V berth seems fine for them.

The boat had a extendable ladder off the swim platform but had the cross-transom seat bolted in place (life raft underneath) so it was a bit of a scramble, the backstay is a handy grab. This one had just a life-line gate across the stern.

All in all I think it would be a fun boat to own/sail.. esp in this area.
 
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She might be a handful in the hands of an inexperienced crew.
If your comfortable sailing her than she will serve you well as a quick cruiser.
I agree with the comment about the traveler; although good for control with a race crew, I can see myself knocking my shins on it about 5 times an hour.
 

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Another thought.

The 36.7's have been raced successfully in Swiftsure, Van Isle and other PNW races. I crewed on Evolution in Swiftsure in 2004 and Jaz in Swiftsure in 2008. They are not just around the buoys racers in this neck of the woods.

I used Evolution as a teaching boat for a few years.

It is a versatile boat in that respect.
 

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Rusty,

We have Beneteau First 36.7 standard draft (shallow) and mostly daysail with several overnighters a year. We also sailed one in the med on a two week cruise. Storage is limited, but that means using an aft berth for storage and generally we just stop storing stuff earlier. The holding tank seemed not just small, but inadequate, so we installed a larger tank. She is a "handful" to sail. My wife has the wheel and I handle the lines. I've never tried sailing solo and doubt that I could in other than lighter air.

As mentioned, sleeping accommodations are limited both in length and width.. My wife and I are both 5' 6" and svelte.

Contact me via private message if you would like to discuss in detail.
 

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I looked at one back when I was looking for a boat with three separate sleeping cabins. I took the boat off my list when I saw how small the lazarette(s) where.

Of course, they are small because of the aft cabins. As stated above, I expect that one of the aft cabins would be used for storage.

I recall that there is a removable storage locker aft.
 

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A 36.7 to me is towards the camping end of cruising. It would be tolerable for a weeks cruise, but not really comfortable.

Here on the Chesapeake, the 7' draft is a serious limitation as well. One of our club members was compelled to move from his slip of many years due to grounding getting in the marina. Of course once he gave up his slip they dredged the next spring.

I'd love to have something that sailed as well as a 36.7 though. I've watched a couple of them walk away from me in our club races. I did "beat" one once, but he was late leaving the dock (advised the RC that he intended to race) and I have no idea how late he was crossing the line for his start time which was 10 minutes behind ours. We tried our best to keep him behind us, but he managed to get a few boat lengths ahead at the line. Still not nearly enough to beat us on corrected time though.
 

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The boat does sail well. Look for one with the ‘deep’ draft and the quick ratio steering. The one I race on is very competitive. Another one I’m signed on with will go to Bermuda from Annapolis in 2012. I think the boat has plenty of space for a coastal cruiser and will do just fine racing 720 miles. If you plan to do well around the cans, we carry 7-9 for w/l racing. The boat needs the weight on the rail. Must be worse with the stubby keel.
 

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Interesting comments, Jack.. We were on a (rare) tiller version, French built and purchased new in Guadaloupe. The twin aft cabins are twins exc some ventilation is available through the lazarette for the port cabin. Without the wheel the centerline bulkhead between the two aft cabins is in fact on center.
The US built 36.7 has the aft bulkhead off-center creating a larger double and a single aft cabin. The French built ones had the center bulkhead.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks to all for the great information and insights. Am posting the same question about a c&C 110.
 

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The US built 36.7 has the aft bulkhead off-center creating a larger double and a single aft cabin. The French built ones had the center bulkhead.
I think all the wheel versions have the off center bulkhead (to make room for the steering gear), and don't believe that any of the US boats were tiller versions. But I expect even the French built wheel steered boats don't have true 'twin' aft cabins.
 

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Thanks to all for the great information and insights. Am posting the same question about a c&C 110.
I think the B36.7 and C&C 110 are just on opposite sides of the dividing line between racer/cruiser with the 36.7 to the racy side and the C&C to the cruise-y side.

I haven't looked at a C&C in person for a while, but on paper they look great to me as one that's more of a cruiser than a racer, but still a guy that wants to sail fast.

If the interiors are as funtional in person as they look in the photo's its a boat that would really make me smile, as I know it will easily smoke my current ride and looks to be just about as comfortable for overnights on the hook.

If someone was really bent on racing though, I don't know how the C&C would fare against the 36.7 if you were campaigning for club points champ.
 

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The C&C would be a nicer interior boat vs the 36.7. Also more likely to be found around here in better shape, ala "sailed hard put away wet"

The 367 you do have the potential to race 1d at races like the NOODs, where as the 110 there are not enough boats local to do so. If you want a potential 1d race, get a 115, there are enough of those.

Reality is, ANY of these will work for around here doing what you propose.

Marty
 

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I think the B36.7 and C&C 110 are just on opposite sides of the dividing line between racer/cruiser with the 36.7 to the racy side and the C&C to the cruise-y side midlifesailor.
Actually the C&C 110 will be a slightly quicker boat and is designated as a racer/ cruiser. PHRF ratings C&C- 75...Bene376- 78. The C&C is a carbon fibre rig also. Also the winches and rquipment on he C&C is sized larger and is of better quality/ grade than the Bene First. Older C&C such as my 35 are a class of racing unto themselves on the Great Lakes

As fae as cruising The ey both will suit the purpose,

I would be careful buying the new C&C as there have been quality issues since joining with Tartan.

Even though I am an older C&C owner, I do not care for the new ones.
 

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Actually, Not ALL 110's are CF in the mast. The one local 110 for sale is a fiberglass hull and alum mast IIRC, ie built before the change to epoxy and CF as is current.

Also locally, the 36.7 is faster than a 110 by 6-9 secs IIRC, the 115 is on par rating wise as 36.7, but generally speaking not able to be sailed, or not sailed by locals to the rating.

Marty
 

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Actually the C&C 110 will be a slightly quicker boat and is designated as a racer/ cruiser. PHRF ratings C&C- 75...Bene376- 78. The C&C is a carbon fibre rig also. Also the winches and rquipment on he C&C is sized larger and is of better quality/ grade than the Bene First. Older C&C such as my 35 are a class of racing unto themselves on the Great Lakes
Yeah, they are rated pretty close, but I'm not sure how that bears out in the real world. I just know either will blow the socks off lots of boats that wear the "racer/cruiser" label. From the perspective of the interiors, the C&C offers more of what a cruiser is going to like, than the Bene and the cruising features I see as a plus on the C&C would matter not a bit to a hard core racer.

I'm a bit surpised you don't care for the new C&C's since they do carry on the tradtion of reasonable amenities with a good turn of speed which are traits your C&C 35 shares. Granted they are far from traditional looking.

I wish I had the budget to consider one.
 
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