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Spent the night recently in Still Pond off the Chesapeake and anchored uneventfully in the muddy bottom. I set the steel Danforth by backing down on it, put plenty of rode out and spent a pleasant night. No storms or high winds. I do not think we swung in an especially wide arch. Next morning I did have some trouble getting the anchor out. No windlass so it was mostly by hand but did use the throttle to help. When the anchor finally came up it was covered in a ball of black mud. Was not until I got back to the dock that I saw the anchor shaft was bent laterally about 5 - 10 degrees. It is hard for me to believe I put that much force on the anchor but it certainly is bent. Trying to figure out if I did something wrong with my anchoring/retrieving or if this just happens sometimes. Also wondering if I can use it bent as is or if it should be fixed or replaced. Boat is 32' and displaces about 8000 lbs.
Appreciate any helpful suggestions.
 

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Old as Dirt!
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Does the angle of the bend correspond with the direction of your prop walk in reverse by any chance?
 

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I would not trust it. Of course, I do not trust any Danforth as a primary anchor.

We could start an anchor war, but I would suggest that you look at a new generation anchor as a replacement. Even some of the older generation one work well. There is only about one brand against which I have a bias - Delta.
 

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We bent the shank on our Danforth. Write to the company. They replaced the anchor at no charge with a brand new anchor. EXCELLENT customer service. We just sent them pictures.

I know that Danforth isn't generally viewed as the "best anchor", but we were very impressed with their service.

~markb
 

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The Fortress did very well in Chesapeake Bay testing as recently reported in another thread. The bottom was pretty much as the OP described. For that type bottom it's a pretty hard to beat that style anchor. And bending would not be a concern either.
 

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The fact that it is bent shows it got a very good hold - surprisingly with a Danforth, but that must the case. So the discussion on anchor type is not really interesting in this first stage.

At the same time, the fact that it is bent shows it is under dimensioned. You need a stronger anchor, which usually means a bigger one.

Then it is time to go back to the question: which one?

There are plenty of anchor threads, we do not have to repeat those here. Buy something that works well in the areas you sail. Try to get original, not copies - they may totally worthless.

A good anchor gives you good sleep. Worth its price.

/J
 

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I once chartered a trawler in the Florida Keys. The anchor it came with was a Danforth and the shank had a slight bend in it. The first night we anchored several squalls came through and we dragged every time. The next day I had the charter company bring me a new anchor and we didn't have anymore trouble.

I'd replace one with a bent shank.
 

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You probably got it stuck under a log and it wouldn't shift when swinging on the anchor. You are lucky to have retrieved it!

I'm sure you need to replace it.

Tod
 

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I use a Danforth for a lunch hook because it's light and can be heaved by hand to get off a sand bar (which, of course, I have never done:rolleyes:) but would not trust one while sleeping. The shanks are quite thin as compared to other anchors so if they get stuck on a rock or log, the shaft is easily bent. They also do not shed sticky mud to reset well but tend to just skip over the bottom once broken out. I'm a firm believer in basic MASS.
 

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I think the angle of the bend is actually opposite of the prop walk.
Actually, you would have had to have determined that at the time you recovered the anchor, assuming you could have seen the bottom. (My thinking was that you might have bent the shank yourself while power setting the anchor, given the bottom you describe.) N'any case, you might want to replace that anchor. Given the bottom conditions, a Fortress would be a good alternative with the further advantage that the Fortress comes with a lifetime guaranty in the event that it is ever bent/damaged. Tough pieces of gear and very reliable when used in the appropriate bottom conditions...
 

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I've seen a few Danforths bent like that. I'd probably just use it for a lunch hook after that. I sure wouldn't sleep on it. Metal fatigue is funny to predict once steel gets bent like that (I learned that working on a farm and bending a lot of steel accidentally on farm implements).

Where I boat, we have mostly sand bottom (with some mud) and Danforths hold pretty good. I've anchored two sailboats with three Danforths (in a star pattern) that road out hurricanes without moving (we had to abandon one of the Danforths on one of those occasions because it was buried so deep we couldn't get it unstuck).

On the other occasion, it took two hours to get all three of the anchors up, because two of them (that took the most wind) were stuck so good.

And, as a funny side note. I anchored my Hobie Cat 16 on the beach during Katrina with two of the same Danforths I used in the second hurricane described above. It was still there, still hooked to them (but broken into three pieces) after Katrina. Again, both were buried so deeply that I just left them there (My daughter and I dug for hours one day trying to dig them up before giving up, as the beach had several more feet of sand on it than when I set them).

I like Manson Supremes and Rocnas better, but I don't have any Danforth hate.

In a place with a lot of weeds on the bottom, I suspect a Danforth wouldn't get much respect, but sand and sand and mud mixed, is not a bad place to use one.
 
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