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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am looking at buying a used boat and would like your opinions on the following.

I have lots of experience sailing daysailers. I want to move up to a larger boat. I know there will be a learning curve but I am willing to hire a captain to take lessons as I learn. There are 3 of us in our family, but the boat should be easily sailed by 2 people. Occasionally we might have another couple overnight. I would rather buy a slightly larger boat then have to trade up in a year or two.

We will be sailing on LI Sound almost exclusively. I am looking at shoal draft boats due to the shallowness of the waters around Norwalk. Most of the time we will be day sailing returning to home port at night. Occassionally we might sail to a different port for a weekend overnight stay. There is a small chance for an occasional longer trip to Block Island.

I am more interested in comfort vs. performance. But I don't want a slow boat either. We do not intend to race. I would like a well built boat and am willing to sacrifice comfort for quality.

My budget is $170K and I do not want anything older then 5 years.

I am looking at the following boats and would appreciate any advice as to advantages/disadvantages of each, which might be better for our needs, and suggestions on maybe other boats to look at.

2005 Beneteau 393 $170K
2006 Beneteau 373 $155K
2006 Hanse 370e $179K
2007 Jeanneau 36i $146K
2003 Jeanneau sun odyssey $135K
2005 Bavaria 37 cruiser $139K
2007 Bavaria 37 cruiser $170K (new)
2004 Catalina 387 $170K

Thanks
 

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I daysail and race on a J24 as well as a 35' boat

The 35' boat is way to much work :)

In all sincerity i would charter one to get a better idea about the amount of time and effort it takes to sail one compared to a smaller boat
 

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So you didn't believe any of the answers in the other thread you asked the same questions in?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I greatly appreciate all the answers and suggestions. But I see no harm in posting in more then one forum to get a wider cross section of ideas.
 

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If you want a good boat for Long Island Sound, get one that is good in light air.
 

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I don't call Long Island Sound the Dead Sea for nothing. :D
Any of the boats in your list would be fine, pick a boat you're comfortable with. Try to go out on some if you know people with those boats. But you will buy two boats over time, the first one you will figure out what you really want in a boat. Where on the sound will you be sailing from? Good luck.
 

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Something you might also consider is that looking for a shoal-draft boat for use in those waters may actually be dangerous. There are many stray rocks and boulders in the Sound, especially off the rocky shores of CT. With a deeper draft you are more likely to hit the keel on a ledge (or the more common sandy bottom) but with a shoal draft, the odds go up that you can strike a rock with the hull--while missing it with the keel.

Unless you know where all the local rocks are, and the tide state, it can be a good idea to simply avoid rockhopping waters. Regardless of draft.
 

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Something you might also consider is that looking for a shoal-draft boat for use in those waters may actually be dangerous. There are many stray rocks and boulders in the Sound, especially off the rocky shores of CT. With a deeper draft you are more likely to hit the keel on a ledge (or the more common sandy bottom) but with a shoal draft, the odds go up that you can strike a rock with the hull--while missing it with the keel.

Unless you know where all the local rocks are, and the tide state, it can be a good idea to simply avoid rockhopping waters. Regardless of draft.
Your keel... the original lead line ;) :D
 

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Hi Pap54
Selecting a new boat is never easy. You need to carefully evaluate your family's lifestyle. You also need to consult seriously with the other family members. My wife will only set foot on a “beautiful” boat. Our son will only sail a “cool” boat. My wife will not stay overnight unless the boat has air-con. My son would love to stay overnight, even in our crammed classic wooden Skerry Cruiser from 1954.
Most families are juggling many commitments and interest. Traditional long distance all-weather cruising is less feasible than it used to be.
Most boats spend most of their time on the mooring. By some measure, all boats are only used 3% of the time.
All the boats that you mention on your list are European boats designed for traditional cruising or charter. They have large cabins with many bunks, lots of storage, and a lot of equipment, most of which you will rarely need for day-sailing in LI Sound as you describe it.
You and your family may instead consider some of the new day-boats that have been introduced in recent years. They all have huge cockpits where you and your guests spend most of the time, yet the small cabin has enough facilities to support day-sailing and the occasional overnight stay in nice weather.
You may find that your family members prefer the graceful lines of a day-boat, and you may enjoy the simple shorthanded handling, and the high speed you get out of these sleek boats. Interestingly, many of these boats are made in America, such as E33, Alerion Express 28, 33, 38, Sabre Spirit, Morris 29, 36, 42. If you dare you can even show your family the Hinckley DS42 but watch out in case they want it!
Best regards
Nis Peter Lorentzen
 
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