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Discussion Starter #1
I was checking out the new National Harbor website, and I noted that in addition to their existing condos, they've got a new townhome development going in called Potomac Overlook. I did notice that none of the condos, or new Potomac Overlook townhomes, seem to include slips at the National Harbor Marina, which is kind of a shame.

I think it would be cool to live in a townhome, (no yard to maintain), and be able to walk to your own slip, and I'm sure there's got to be plenty of these kinds of properties in the Chesapeake Bay area. So what would get your vote for the ideal "boater's" real estate in the bay area? Parameters are under a million including slip, house townhome or condo, (prefer private garage), anywhere on the bay, (Western or Eastern Shore).

Thanks..
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Good point. I should have been clearer in that it was the National Harbor properties that got me thinking about the subject but I'm partial to living on the bay. Having said that, if someone has a recommendation anywhere in the greater DC area like on the Potomac, I'd be interested in hearing about that too.
 

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There are lots of houses n the Baywith slips. Water depth is often an issue, and there is a huge premium for water views. I needed 7 foot depth and found a house with a slip (but no view) in Edgewater. Send me a PM if you wnt more info.
 

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I have a +2 acre, waterfront lot in the northern neck, 8'MLW and an 80' pier in place...soil work done....with my asking price you could build a mansion for less than a million...

let me know if you want details, or know someone who may
 

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How reasonable can someone buy waterfront property within two hours of the PA line? Navigable water. (doesn't need to be deep, but no low bridges downstream) Livable house. Dock, or at least whatever requirements are needed to put one in. $200k? $300k? What about across the street from the water but with deeded access or a dock? Just curious/dreaming.
 

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There is a little known compromise, that works well:
Water-privileged property.

My property is much less expensive than actual waterfront property, but my boat is a mere 5 minute walk down to the private, community dock where I store my boat.

These little communities were established in the 40's 50's and 60's (I think).
If you own property in the neighborhood, you have a right to join the "beach club". Many of these clubs have a private dock. You pay an annual club dues for access to the beach and for the slip.

I pay $575 dollars per year, for access to the private beach and a slip for my 30 foot boat w/5 foot draft. Water and shore power included. No bridges downstream. I can hoist my sails after a 10-15 minute motor out of the creek.

We elect a "dock master" who is a responsible member of the community, who is tasked with maintaining the dock and utilities. He puts a bubbler in the water, when the cove ices over, as well.

My house is so close, that I walk to the boat most of the time, unless I'm bringing down a bunch of heavy tools and work materials. Some of my more distant neighbors ride a golf cart or a "gator" down to the dock.

All the convenience of waterfront living, without the risk and hassle.
 

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Ditto what Bubblehead said. I live 200 yards from our community pier and beach and pay $600/year for my slip. My house cost $235,000 - it was originally a summer cottage built in the 1940s and is kinda small, but it has a roof that keeps the rain off of our heads, and we haven't ruined the shoreline by putting up townhouses or chopping down all the trees so our McMansion has a view.
 

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Ha, we have even more in common than I knew, Willy.

Over the years, hurricanes have taken their toll and some of the quaint, little homes have been knocked down and replaced by these "starter castles". Still, there are plenty of original homes in the area, thank goodness.
 

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I've owned waterfront property with an attached dock and ocean access. For the extra I paid for that little bit of bulkheaded waterfront, I could have built a much nicer home a few miles from the water, and kept my boat at the nicest marina in the country, and had a lot of money left over.

I enjoyed it, (up until Katrina) but I wouldn't do it again.

I lived in Arnold, on the Severn River, and kept my sailboat on a mooring in Chase Creek. It took me longer to dinghy out to it, than it did to drive/walk from my house to the dinghy rack that my neighborhood association provided.

Except for Maryland weather, and a too short boating season, that was a pretty nice set up.
 

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It is almost impossible to build or cut trees within 1,000 feet of the Bay. The fine is 5k per tree! In order to reduce run-off, there are strict limits on how much of a lot can be covered with impermeable surfaces. The State wants you to build tall homes with small footprints.
Then there must be some exceptions to the rule or certain officials are more flexible than others, because a number of houses have gone up near us that don't seem to follow these codes. Nearly all the houses that I ave seen go up within a half mile of our beach on lots where an older house was knocked down are tall, but also as long and wide as the lot itself. In one case, two houses were built 3 feet apart and and arm's reach from the neighbors on either side.
 

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^^ Yep. People who know how to petition the environmental boards, get all kinds of waivers. The starter castles I've seen, aren't just tall, they're much broader than the original bungalo's of the 60's that previously occupied the same property.
 

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It is almost impossible to build or cut trees within 1,000 feet of the Bay. The fine is 5k per tree! In order to reduce run-off, there are strict limits on how much of a lot can be covered with impermeable surfaces. The State wants you to build tall homes with small footprints.
Home Page for Critical Areas Commission for the Chesapeake and Atlantic Coastal Bays - Maryland Department of Natural Resources
You have to believe that residential development has a major impact of bay pollution for these rules to not seem like the nanny state poking its nose in where it can.

Agricultural interests are far to strong to take on, so the largest polluter continues business as usual while less powerful interests get silly regulations piled on.
 
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