SailNet Community banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
134 Posts
Depends on the boat you want . .
But be careful, a lot of newkie boat shoppers do not understand that some boats have a negative value - i.e., they are worth less, sometimes MUCH less, than nothing.
One of my former students was given a Tartan 27 in bad shape. It never did go in the water, and he lost lots of money and time in working on it.
 

·
Master Mariner
Joined
·
9,414 Posts
If you are looking for an ocean worthy cruiser, then there are a lot of "ports of broken dreams". If not, Yachtworld.com is a pretty good place to surf, checking asking prices, availability and options for any boat you might be interested in.
But first, you really need to know what boats will suit your needs and that, of course, means knowing what those are.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,689 Posts
In general, the best place to buy a boat is close to where you are.
I have some firsthand experience with this. I drove more than 5,000 miles looking for a Morgan 33 Out Island. I ended up buying one 50 miles from home.

First and foremost, you should have a good idea of exactly what you are looking for and the type of cruising you anticipate doing. For example, there are lots of boats out there at bargain basement prices that will suffice for playing around on lakes, but those boats usually are unsuitable for coastal cruising.

So the question that you must ask yourself is: Where do I intend to cruise, and what boat is suitable for what I intend to do? Will be you solo sailing, or will you be taking your spouse and family members along? How much storage do you need? Can you handle the boat by yourself, or do you need a crew? Lots and lots of questions to be answered before heading out and looking for a boat.

Where to find that boat is usually not very far away. Used sailboats are a dime a dozen, and from my research, most of the derelict boats in boatyards and marinas are usually sailboats. I came across one boat yard in Maryland that had at least 30 derelicts that the boat yard owner would be more than happy to give to anyone that wanted them. Most were in terrible condition, but there were a few that were in excellent condition, had lots of sails, good rigging, and a running inboard engine. They were abandoned because the owner had passed away and the family didn't want the boat to begin with, therefore, as far as they were concerned, they would not pay for the overdue storage fees, and because the owner was dead, they were not responsible. The marina just wanted the boat out of there so they could rent the space to someone that would pay for that space.

Good luck,

Gary :cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,958 Posts
How many here have had a moment when you would have sold the boat to the first bloke you see with a fiver?

Walk around a yard and look for some guy sitting in his cockpit, red faced, about to cry. If you like the boat make him a low ball offer.

Who knows, it might be me.

Carpe Diem.
 

·
Bombay Explorer 44
Joined
·
3,619 Posts
If you are looking for a Bene/Bav/Sun 7 yrs old then one of the big charter centers is where I would look. Moorings have their own brokerage.

If older then FLORIDA is the place. Lots of boats that have dead owners or owners that can no longer manage to sail them. The dock fees are mounting and they want it gone.
 

·
Senior Smart Aleck
Joined
·
2,150 Posts
The trick is to find an older boat that is in good shape in the areas that matter.

Don't worry about whether the paint is shiny or whether it has the latest and greatest gear or whether the portlights leak or the stanchions are properly bedded.

Be concerned about the following: engine, sails, basic bones - keel bolts, bulkeads, standing rigging.

Read about Donna Ferron's first boat - she approached it exactly right - you are buying a learning experience that you can have some fun with. It is good to learn how to maintain and repair a boat and you should start small and simple, then work your way up.

I suggest you start by reading "Good Old Boat" by Don Casey.

Look at used boats on eBay, Craigslist, and saiboatlistings.com. Take your time. Take an experienced sailor along for an inspection before you buy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
244 Posts
I spent 11 months looking at sailboats. I was not sure what I wanted as it was the first cabin type sailboat I was looking to buy. I thought I wanted a furler, bimini & wheel. Also, I wanted to be able to trailer it. I was about ready to fly up to Illinois to look at a boat when I found an ad for a boat about 200 miles from home. Went to look-took it sailing, made an offer. Went back the following week to put it on a trailer and bring home. Since then I have replaces all the lines, main sail, engine, lots of wood, cushions and added several items. Love the boat, but have way too much money invested. Only short fall is the cabin is about 2 inches to low for me to stand up in. I envy those that know exactly what they want and can just go find it.
Found mine on Sailing Texas WEB site.

Good luck in your search.
 

·
One of None
Hunter 34
Joined
·
9,026 Posts
In general, the best place to buy a boat is close to where you are.
Another Mystery OP, doesn't even say they are. This really gets tiring.. guessing where.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
19,484 Posts
I would not totally overlook the finish. Boats with shiny gelcoat and nice paint take less work scrubbing.
A boat that looks that good, it's good odds it was well looked after in other areas too - taking over pride of ownership is a lot easier than building your own from a beater.

The biggest issue here could be getting the seller to realize that his/her asking price is out of line (usually high) even though they've 'updated everything and poured their soul into the boat for the last ten years'. (He says, looking in the mirror! ;))
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
148 Posts
One major variable is what size boat are you looking at. Living in the middle of Michigan, I am only interested in a trailer sailor. My horizon then for a boat was anywhere I would be willing (able) to drive to in a reasonable amount of time. I saw lots of boats I was interested in in CA and TX, but getting them was out of the question. I found a Chrysler 26 I really liked in NY, and bought it on ebay for $280. With all of the fees, gas to get it, marina fee to put in on the trailer (more than I paid for the boat!), it cost me about $1,000. It is a solid boat, with newer sails, a 2002 outboard that runs like a top. It needs cosmetic work, and some minor repairs around the mast step, but nothing I can't do, so I am happier than a pig in slop. I already have a one ton truck to tow with, and was able to buy a beast of a trailer here locally for $800. You have to figure all of this in, and calculate what you are willing, or able to spend. My budget was around $2K, which I came close to, but only a small fraction of that was the price of the boat. If you are looking at a larger boat that is impractical to trailer, none of this applies.
The other consideration I see is your state in life. Are you talking about being able to go anywhere in the world to buy a boat? Will you go to the boat, and begin your new life on board? If so, maybe you will find an amazing deal in one of the "harbors of broken dreams" people talk about. If you are looking to have it near where you live on land, then you are again limited to something close by, or you have to factor in delivery costs, and or time.
Either way, enjoy the process. I have had almost as much fun looking for and buying a boat as I do sailing. Almost...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
I started with the internet. I had an idea of what I wanted, but no idea about a fair price or what to expect for my money. I knew I would be primarily sailing on Barnegat Bay (which is very shallow) So once I had an idea of what things cost / what to expect (And I read a very god article on how to inspect an old boat on this forum). I started looking at what was available locally. I ended up finding several boats (across my spectrum) at a local brokerage.I researched each make on the internet. I looked at them and found one that fit the bill so I didm't have to go very far. Hope that helps.
 

·
Old enough to know better
Joined
·
4,354 Posts
I think it depends on your budget. In my list below you find your price range and include that range, and what is listed in the smaller price ranges.

Under $7,000 mainly Craigslist
Under $12,000 add in Sailboatlistings and sailing Texas (though Sailing Texas has an awful layout and organization but is not just for Texas as the name indicates)
Under $17,000 add in most sailing websites
Over $25,000 look at a broker too. (Check out Yachtworld for the listings)


Keep in mind, just like with buying a house brokers work and represent the seller, sure there are a few "buyers brokers" but even they are working on commission so it is to there advantage to push you to a more expensive boat, or keep the price as high as they can. But at a certain price point boats will be listed with brokers, so you will likely have to deal with them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Where to find that boat is usually not very far away. Used sailboats are a dime a dozen, and from my research, most of the derelict boats in boatyards and marinas are usually sailboats. I came across one boat yard in Maryland that had at least 30 derelicts that the boat yard owner would be more than happy to give to anyone that wanted them. Most were in terrible condition, but there were a few that were in excellent condition, had lots of sails, good rigging, and a running inboard engine. They were abandoned because the owner had passed away and the family didn't want the boat to begin with, therefore, as far as they were concerned, they would not pay for the overdue storage fees, and because the owner was dead, they were not responsible. The marina just wanted the boat out of there so they could rent the space to someone that would pay for that space.

Good luck,

Gary :cool:
There are very few boatyards around where those running the boatyard do not have some sense of the worth of a boat. No marina is going to give away a boat that has enough value that they could make money on it. It would be no different than them giving away their services or new products off the shelf. A more likely explanation is that it can take surprisingly little neglect to make a boat not economically worth restoring, and therefore unsaleable to anyone who knows anything about boats. And salvage value is all well and good but you have to have a really cheap place to keep it while you're breaking it down and parting it out--and most folks don't. And then all the pieces that don't have salvage value you have to pay to dispose of. A pretty solid truism in the marine world is that "there ain't no such thing as a free boat". Not even close.
 

·
Master Mariner
Joined
·
9,414 Posts
There are very few boatyards around where those running the boatyard do not have some sense of the worth of a boat. No marina is going to give away a boat that has enough value that they could make money on it. It would be no different than them giving away their services or new products off the shelf. A more likely explanation is that it can take surprisingly little neglect to make a boat not economically worth restoring, and therefore unsaleable to anyone who knows anything about boats. And salvage value is all well and good but you have to have a really cheap place to keep it while you're breaking it down and parting it out--and most folks don't. And then all the pieces that don't have salvage value you have to pay to dispose of. A pretty solid truism in the marine world is that "there ain't no such thing as a free boat". Not even close.
Quite often it comes down to the incredible hassle it takes a boatyard or marina to attain a title on an abandoned boat. It isn't easy, it requires a certain amount of time abandoned and it isn't cheap. Most yards I know will wait until they have at least several, before calling their lawyer to start the process. In the interim, I have seen boats completely fill with rain water, become home to packs of rats and otherwise be totally neglected, because it really doesn't behoove the yard to spend a dime on them until they have ownership. Then they have a sale or auction and then its buyer beware.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top