SailNet Community banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Over Hill Sailing Club
Joined
·
3,688 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've tried various grab hooks and methods of putting a snubber on 3/8" chain. What are some opinions about the best and most convenient way to accomplish this without either having the grab hook fall off when the tide switches or a knot to unjam. Has anyone had good luck with one of those elastic type snubbers? I have never tried one, assuming that the tension would be difficult to adjust on a rubber band with a set amount of elasticity.
 

·
Over Hill Sailing Club
Joined
·
3,688 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Yes, definitely going to try that. I have some spare soft shackles made up from some left over Dyneema. Wondering about abrasion but it will be worth trying it. Line will also be easier on galvanization than a grab hook. A prusic works but when slack, can loosen too easily.
 

·
Old enough to know better
Joined
·
4,343 Posts
I was going to answer BL Jones, but I guess you are talking about a anchor snubber, not an internet snubber! I was going to suggest looking at the Mantus one, looks well designed, but have not tried one myself.
 

·
Over Hill Sailing Club
Joined
·
3,688 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I was going to answer BL Jones, but I guess you are talking about a anchor snubber, not an internet snubber! I was going to suggest looking at the Mantus one, looks well designed, but have not tried one myself.
The problem with any of the grab hook ideas is that when the chain is just hanging straight down without a load, there is the tendency for them to fall off because both chain and snubber are under no tension. There needs to be some sort of closure. The Mantus gizmo looks like it might be less likely than a standard grab hook to just drop off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,007 Posts
The problem with any of the grab hook ideas is that when the chain is just hanging straight down without a load, there is the tendency for them to fall off because both chain and snubber are under no tension. There needs to be some sort of closure. The Mantus gizmo looks like it might be less likely than a standard grab hook to just drop off.
I bought the Mantus hook (in stainless) and am quite impressed. Seems much, much more secure than the simple chain hook I used previously (OK, it is also much, much more expensive :). Have not had a chance to use it while anchoring but I fitted in on the chain and I would be very surprised if it fell off. Then again, my Home Depot Special essentially never fell off...
 

·
Not Finished Yet
Joined
·
829 Posts
Another problem for me is that any solution I need to be able to rig before the anchor chain passes through the bow roller. This means everything needs to pass through the roller. I personally do not want to bend over the bow rail and then attach something outside the boat. This rules out a Mantus hook and is the primary reason I went with the soft shackle.

My requirements where:

- low cost
- simple
- reliable
- pass through bow roller
- easy to undo (pull in) in a panic
- easy to ditch in a panic
- provides plenty of stretch in shallow water (usually anchor in 6-10')

This list lead me to a snubber line going over the bow roller then attached to the chain with a soft shackle.
 

·
Over Hill Sailing Club
Joined
·
3,688 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Another problem for me is that any solution I need to be able to rig before the anchor chain passes through the bow roller. This means everything needs to pass through the roller. I personally do not want to bend over the bow rail and then attach something outside the boat. This rules out a Mantus hook and is the primary reason I went with the soft shackle.

My requirements where:

- low cost
- simple
- reliable
- pass through bow roller
- easy to undo (pull in) in a panic
- easy to ditch in a panic
- provides plenty of stretch in shallow water (usually anchor in 6-10')

This list lead me to a snubber line going over the bow roller then attached to the chain with a soft shackle.
Good point. It's a pain trying to reach outside the rails on hands and knees to get a grab hook on in front of the bow roller without it dropping off before it gets tensioned. The soft shackle idea sounds like the way to go although the line will need to be brought under the roller's top ring anyway. A soft shackle made from 1/4" Dyneema has more strength than needed. Will be interesting to try this along with some soft lay nylon to replace the old/hard/crappy pc of line I've been using.
 

·
Old as Dirt!
Joined
·
3,486 Posts
Our snubber is two 25' lengths of 5/8" 3-strand both connected to a single chain hook sized for 3/8" BBB chain. We leave a loop of chain sufficient to dangle in the water between the bow roller and the chain hook and if the weather looks a bit questionable I mouse the hook with a length of Velcro one-wrap to prevent it releasing from the chain unexpectedly. 'Seems to work, or at least has thus far.

FWIW...
 

·
Over Hill Sailing Club
Joined
·
3,688 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
The Velcro wrap sounds like a good method. Part of the mission I try to accomplish with a snubber is to take strain off the bow roller and move it over to a sturdy fairlead. In a heavy blow, with the boat moving side to side, the lateral strain on the bow roller is a concern. Although bolted through with 3/8" bolts, there has to be a point at which a standard roller frame itself would bend. Someday I'd like to build an entire new bow unit with a really rugged roller built in but it's pretty low on the priority list.
 

·
Old as Dirt!
Joined
·
3,486 Posts
The Velcro wrap sounds like a good method. Part of the mission I try to accomplish with a snubber is to take strain off the bow roller and move it over to a sturdy fairlead. In a heavy blow, with the boat moving side to side, the lateral strain on the bow roller is a concern. Although bolted through with 3/8" bolts, there has to be a point at which a standard roller frame itself would bend. Someday I'd like to build an entire new bow unit with a really rugged roller built in but it's pretty low on the priority list.
Generally, bow rollers are not intended, nor designed, for mooring loads (and particularly not roller assemblies that are obscenely cantilevered off the bow). They are merely intended to allow rode to be deployed/retrieved without chafe or damage to the yacht and, to a lesser extent, to house/secure the anchor. Mooring loads should be carried by stout mooring cleats or Sampson posts with rodes led through chalks/fairleads. We virtually never fail to use our snubbers led through stout smooth fairleads on either side of the bow except in very benign conditions.

FWIW...
 
  • Like
Reactions: vtsailguy

·
Registered
Joined
·
728 Posts
The best method that I found for attaching the snubber to the chain is using a klemheist knot. see Animated Knots by Grog | How to Tie Knots | Fishing, Boating, Climbing, Scouting, Search and Rescue, Household, Decorative, Rope Care,

Here is how I set it up: The snubber is made up with a 30 ft piece of line with a loop in the middle. One end is attached to starboard and the other goes to the port bow. The middle loop is made with a alpine butterfly knot. To this loop is attached a large shackle.

Another line(around 8 foot) is joined at two ends to make a loop using a triple fisherman knot. I then take this loop and wrap it around the anchor chain using a klemheist knot. The loop of the 30 foot line is then joined to the loop of the other line using the shackle mentioned previously.

I could make up a longer snubber line if desired and control the length of the bridle that is used by just adjusting the snubber from the starboard and port bow cleats(sampson post)
 

·
Over Hill Sailing Club
Joined
·
3,688 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Generally, bow rollers are not intended, nor designed, for mooring loads (and particularly not roller assemblies that are obscenely cantilevered off the bow). They are merely intended to allow rode to be deployed/retrieved without chafe or damage to the yacht and, to a lesser extent, to house/secure the anchor. Mooring loads should be carried by stout mooring cleats or Sampson posts with rodes led through chalks/fairleads. We virtually never fail to use our snubbers led through stout smooth fairleads on either side of the bow except in very benign conditions.

FWIW...
I leave my anchor over the roller without a snubber unless it's blowing. It does not cantilever very far and is a rugged construction. Have never had an issue with it. The snubber goes through the fairlead and right to a large cleat which can take the load off the roller but I don't always put one on. It's easy enough to put on if necessary.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,202 Posts
I bought and returned a Mantus hook. It was HUGE. It's not even possible to reach over our pulpit to attach the hook, so a snubber must fit through the bow roller.

I am got to try the Wichard hook next. I'm thinking of smaller line with a rubber snubber all spliced so eyes lie over the foredeck cleats and the line runs straight out the roller. Winter project.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top