SailNet Community banner
1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In the summer months I'll be anchoring out, motoring to shore in my dinghy for my day-to-day routines. Yesterday I rowed out to my sailboat (purchased an outboard motor today, because THAT was a giant pain in the you know what), and got rather wetter than I'd like. Seeing as how I'll be living on the water, it's probably realistic to assume I'll always get wet. I'm a quick learner. ;) I live in the Pacific Northwest, so I'll always be wet regardless of season. It's even raining today, in the middle of flipping July. Not. Fair.

Anyhoo, I was wondering what the best and most economical waterproof clothing and gear is out there. Any suggestions? I'd also love some tips on waterproof backpacks (especially for my laptop) and a good brand of PFD for my Sheltie (he's about 20 pounds). I've done some google searches, but I want to hear your expert advice/opinions on brands.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Raingear

Yep. Four straight days of rain here in the Pac NW. We keep our boat in Poulsbo, WA and I have some really nice Gill foulies that I hardly ever wear unless it is really cold out.

Are you or do you have a friend who is a member of Costco? For just day in/day out rain, you can't beat Costco raingear. Inexpensive and does the job.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,376 Posts
Wetskins from Costco are OK. I sued to use some for golf raingear.

But best and inexpensive are not to be used in the same sentence.

I am a fan of Helly Hansen and Gill.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,557 Posts
Foulies are a personal preference. You might just need to find out for yourself but i do subscribe to the noTion that outdoor stores like rei or ems will get you more bang for the buck.

Look into kayaking dry bags for a backpack. They do make wearable ones and will usually float if they go overboard.

We use Pawsaboard life jackets for our dog. Full belly wraparound with straps and a handle for lifting if needed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,223 Posts
Best lower cost stuff is the yellow PVC gear that the commercial fisherman use. Nothing fancy but keeps you dry and lasts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,798 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,557 Posts
The trick to rain gear is keeping the water out and also letting your body breathe. Without breath-ability you will still get wet. It will just be from your own body moisture instead of rain, especially if it is humid which it usually is while raining. Remember wearing the rubber mask for Halloween? Now cover your entire body and see what happens.

If you need to wear rain gear for a long time it is hard to beat Goretex and similar materials.

I find that if it is humid out, it does not take long to start sweating under my gear so mine has to breathe to be comfortable..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,798 Posts
.......If you need to wear rain gear for a long time it is hard to beat Goretex and similar materials..........mine has to breathe to be comfortable..
Agreed. However, breathable gear, like gortex, is water resistant not water proof. Ask me how I know. Still good stuff.

I don't know this for sure, but also suspect Gortex breaks down a bit over time as well and becomes less resistant.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,376 Posts
Agreed. However, breathable gear, like gortex, is water resistant not water proof. Ask me how I know. Still good stuff.

I don't know this for sure, but also suspect Gortex breaks down a bit over time as well and becomes less resistant.
My Gill jacket and Helly Hansen bibs did not leak at all when I delivered a race boat from Maui to Vancouver last summer. Without a dodger we were taking waves on a regular basis. I was dry.

Breathable foulies need to be washed to get the salt out them. Apparently the salt granules between the thread can cause a leak.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,557 Posts
Agreed. However, breathable gear, like gortex, is water resistant not water proof. Ask me how I know. Still good stuff.

I don't know this for sure, but also suspect Gortex breaks down a bit over time as well and becomes less resistant.
Minnewaska, I agree with the first statement except I feel breathable, water-resistant gear will keep you drier(water intrusion and sweat) in the long run.

Gortex can loose it's resistance over time and when washed. But there are many products to re-treat them and make them resistant again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,798 Posts
.....Without a dodger we were taking waves on a regular basis....
Been there. Most recently whne moving my boat for maintenance at the end of the winter. Blowing 38kts in 40 degree temps, nothing installed yet, not even the sails. Ugly.

However, I soaked a gortex top layer straight through in torrential non-stop rain over about 6 hours. I was actually standing on shore watching my son race...... he had it worse.

Breathable foulies need to be washed to get the salt out them. Apparently the salt granules between the thread can cause a leak.
I will bet the salt grinds the fabric over time and ruins it. As mentioned by others, washing seems to degrade water repellency, so retreating might be the order of things. I've never done it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
i used REI rain gear for a few months off the coast of Africa where we got hit with short down pours a few times a day. they were breathable and had lots of large zipper vents. still was soaked from just sweating. ended up just wearing the quickdry stuff that dries in about half hour of wearing and is comfy for the following 5mo. :)
mind u it was more humid and i was rowing and hiking a lot. was happy with both for the purpose they were for
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
As for your laptop: I would recommend 100% a Pelican Case. There is a special line of cases designed just for laptops;They are a bit pricey but well worth it. All of my sensitive gear lives in these cases and i have never had a problem. Plus the warranty is no questions asked. I had a smaller case for my cell phone and after about 10 yrs of abuse (and i don't say abuse lightly) the hinge started to developed a crack. They replaced it for free with the new model even though at the time, the case was still functional.
 

·
Irrationally Exuberant
Joined
·
1,434 Posts
Gore-tex and the like are definitely waterproof, and they might even be somewhat breathable. But the GT membrane relies on the water-resistant layer of fabric--the part we all see--to keep the membrane from drowning from the outside, thus cancelling its breathability.

So for the boat, I've just cut to the chase and gone with PVC coated. Cabelas has some relatively inexpensive coated bibs and parkas.
 

·
Bombay Explorer 44
Joined
·
3,619 Posts
Anyhoo, I was wondering what the best and most economical waterproof clothing and gear is out there..
Well after buying 3 cheap sets of waterproof clothing in 2 years and having a wet bottom and rapid wear I bit the bullet and bought a set of Henri Lloyd Ocean racers. Their top of the range gear. It is the most I have ever spent on 2 items of clothing BUT more than 20 years later I can still wear them and stay dry. Mind you they stay in the locker nearly all the time as I am out in the Caribbean and even the rain is warm.

I'd also love some tips on waterproof backpacks (especially for my laptop) QUOTE]

I have a Victoria back pack [ A good buy ] and use a heavy weight ziplock back for the lappie with the zip down in the back pack. So far so good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
736 Posts
Anyhoo, I was wondering what the best and most economical waterproof clothing and gear is out there. Any suggestions? I'd also love some tips on waterproof backpacks (especially for my laptop) and a good brand of PFD for my Sheltie (he's about 20 pounds). I've done some google searches, but I want to hear your expert advice/opinions on brands.
You're right. We get wet all year long. What rain gear to use depends on how you will be using it. If you are just needed raingear for the row to and from your boat (quicker now that you have an outboard) then I'd go with the Costco stuff. I have a set and it is very good for the price.

BTW, where is your boat? We are in Gig Harbor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
342 Posts
I love discussions on foulies. If you live/sail in warmer climates, then W.L. Gore's product may just be the hot ticket. If you're having to treat the fabric to regain repellency, then it's likely the DWR that's broken down, not the Gore-Tex fabric itself.

If you live/sail in colder locations, then something like a PVC coated fabric is your best bet. At that point, the idea is to keep the cold water from soaking the heat out of you. Period.

A good layering system will take care of the comfort factor. All synthetic fabrics starting with a fitted base layer, followed by gradually thicker layers would be my recommendation. Your body heat will push the moisture through the synthetics to the inside of your rain gear, and keep you from feeling clammy. By the time you've layered enough to limit mobility, it will likely be cold enough to be iced in (not always the case mind you)

Watch Deadliest Catch and count the number of Gore-Tex outfits you see. Take a look at pictures of Superior and Huron in December, and you'll get an idea of where I got my opinion from, and why my waterproof 20 year old Helly's are still around (leaks and all).

Good luck with your decision. :)

Oh.... for a quick dory ride ashore, a good slicker may suit your needs better.
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top