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Telstar 28
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Do you know how thick the fiberglass there is??? If it is fairly thick and the gouge doesn't go more than a small bit of the way through it, you might be able to get away with filling the gouge with thickened epoxy...like MarineTex.

However, I would personally recommend:

  • washing the area with a good detergent, like TSP,
  • then de-waxing/de-greasing the hull with something like Interlux Fiberglass Prep Wash 202, and
  • then grinding/sanding the area around the gouge to a 12:1 bevel... and
  • then re-building the area with several layers of fiberglass cloth and epoxy resin.
Once this area has been built back up, you can fair it with thickened epoxy and sand it to match the original contours and then gelcoat it.

LOL... just saw CalebD's post... :) Yeah, he's right.. I was checking e-mail, not Sailnet. :)

BTW, cloth is far better than mat for this kind of repair, IMHO, since cloth is generally stronger than CSM is. :)
 

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Telstar 28
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992 Posts
It would effectively just be filling the damaged area, but not really restoring the strength to the area the way grinding and laminating new fiberglass would. The strength of fiberglass is primarily in the glass fibers.

The Marine-tex option, this sounds easier and if I understand how this works, I wouldn't have to grind out as far. Is there some reason marine-tex would be less desirable here versus doing the big grind out/build up?
 

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Telstar 28
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992 Posts
SF-

MarineTex is an epoxy putty... from their website:

Marine-Tex is a heavy-duty structural epoxy, used to repair aluminum, fiberglass and wooden boats, reinstall loose or stripped fasteners, permanently bond dissimilar metals without galvanic corrosion, and fill gouges in wood, metal and fiberglass, making repaired areas stronger than before.
Marine-Tex is an excellent choice for repairing problem areas located below the waterline. Marine-Tex is resistant to water and many chemicals.
I would not use MarineTex as I would would worry that differences in expansion rates and shrinkage would result in cracks developing. Expoxy filler would be better, glass would be best.

the real issue with this repair is whether you will mind a bright white spot on the bow of your boat...what you would really pay the yard $450 for is their expertise in matching the gelcoat so the repair is hard to see, say from 10 feet away. Do it your self and you are likely to have a bright white spot on your bow for the rest of your ownership. If you are Ok with that, go for it, this would seem to be a cosmetic repair.
 
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