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· islander bahama 24
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Pretty sure I visualized exactly what you are thinking. I've seen plenty of dock side connections have difficulty, when the boat is not moving. I still think that's a risk. Then, what are you going to do with the contaminated hose, when you're finished? Yuk.
Just like in an RV you cap it and secure the hose assembly outside of the living space
However the real question should be why did they not design it with an overboard discharge to begin with that isn't a little day sailer
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
...why did they not design it with an overboard discharge to begin with that isn't a little day sailer
I'm on Lake Michigan where "no overboard discharge" is the law...I think. Anyway, I had to sign a paper at the harbor that says "there is no way" to dump black water (hose disconnected or no hoe). So, the previous owners either ordered the boat with the hole not drilled, or they had it plugged. Currently, I can't find where the hole was drilled (looking from the inside)...if it was previously drilled. Additionally, one of the hoses coming off the Y-Valve is plugged and just laying in the area under the Y-value. I am going to look around a bit to see if I can find where the hole might have been drilled. There is a hull liner on this boat, so I should be able to find a hole in the hull liner if it was previously drilled.
 

· islander bahama 24
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I'm on Lake Michigan where "no overboard discharge" is the law...I think. Anyway, I had to sign a paper at the harbor that says "there is no way" to dump black water (hose disconnected or no hoe). So, the previous owners either ordered the boat with the hole not drilled, or they had it plugged. Currently, I can't find where the hole was drilled (looking from the inside)...if it was previously drilled. Additionally, one of the hoses coming off the Y-Valve is plugged and just laying in the area under the Y-value. I am going to look around a bit to see if I can find where the hole might have been drilled. There is a hull liner on this boat, so I should be able to find a hole in the hull liner if it was previously drilled.
If there is a wye valve there was likely a thru hull and was glassed over at some point that would have been good info to include to begin the search with
 

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Another option would be a system to pump the tank while at sea via the deck pump out fitting what boat is it and what is the current head and tank installation here are a couple ideas that would in my opinion be better than a hole in the boat
This I would highly recommend against. It would require a much stronger pump (much more expensive) and any foul ups would spread sewage all over the deck.
One boat I worked on used air to pump out the 5 ton holding tank. Close all the inlets to the tank, open the overboard line and start an air compressor. Absolutely fool proof. Best system EVER!
 

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A compressor is a great idea! I can even envision a manual hand pump, in the event the electric compressor failed. I have a mascerating overboard pump now. If it fails, I'm out of luck. The only down side is needing to get under the floor to close off each of the other hoses each time. Otherwise, you just force the contents back to the heads and out the vent as well.
 

· Don't call me a "senior"!
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... a hose screwing into the deck fitting then twist locking to the pump and a fixed 5 foot discharge hose with a weighted end to keep it pointed down and use it to pump the tanks when needed not every time you use the head
My boat partner and I once considered using a similar solution. However, we figured that pressurizing the holding tank (albeit briefly) wasn't a very good idea. Just too many potential disasters. We also were a bit concerned about where/how to store the dirty discharge hose. Storage on our Ericson 27 is at a premium as it is, without trying to find somewhere to keep a poopy length of hose.
 

· islander bahama 24
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My boat partner and I once considered using a similar solution. However, we figured that pressurizing the holding tank (albeit briefly) wasn't a very good idea. Just too many potential disasters. We also were a bit concerned about where/how to store the dirty discharge hose. Storage on our Ericson 27 is at a premium as it is, without trying to find somewhere to keep a poopy length of hose.
Actually suction not pressure and with the caps on there is no mess how do you think they pump you at the docks
 

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A compressor is a great idea! I can even envision a manual hand pump, in the event the electric compressor failed. I have a mascerating overboard pump now. If it fails, I'm out of luck. The only down side is needing to get under the floor to close off each of the other hoses each time. Otherwise, you just force the contents back to the heads and out the vent as well.
It was a metal tank and all the valves were in one place except the air line, which was in the engine room with the dual compressors. Each valve handle was painted a different color and there was a similarly colored spot under where the valve handle must be to show absolutely that the valve was closed, or open in the case of the overboard valve. No amount of rum or gin could get me to make a mistake!
 

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Actually suction not pressure and with the caps on there is no mess how do you think they pump you at the docks
Well, we figured that we would avoid having the suction from a pump-out station pulling the waste through a pump (and to avoid having another pump all together). To do so, we thought that we might have a valve on the vent, and then pressurize the tank a bit via the toilet's waste pump. With the vent closed, the only place for the pressure to go would be via the deck plate and attached hose. Once the flow got going the pressure needed would be pretty minimal due to the siphon action as the blackwater flowed back down and out the overboard waste hose. --- Yes, it was a pretty hair-brained idea. Luckily we realized that, and stuck with the conventional thru-hull discharge and y-valve. And, we don't have 5 or 6 feet of poopy hose to store.
 

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Well, we figured that we would avoid having the suction from a pump-out station pulling the waste through a pump.....
The deck pumpout should never be plumbed through a pump. It should ideally be through a dip tube through the tank top. Second choice is a dedicated outlet at or near the tank bottom.
 

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The deck pumpout should never be plumbed through a pump. It should ideally be through a dip tube through the tank top. Second choice is a dedicated outlet at or near the tank bottom.
Right. But if we were going to attach a hose to the deck fitting to discharge the waste overboard we would have to get raise the blackwater 4 feet or so, either with a pump or by pressurizing the tank an bit. If we kept the pump, I suppose that we could have valved it off in its own loop. But that would have been a bit complicated.
 

· Learning the HARD way...
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The boat is a 1984 Bene First 35. Currently has a bag, but we will be converting to a rigid tank within the next year. The head is on the port side just behind the v-berth. The tanks is in the v-berth. The pump out is on the starboard side and about even with the back of the v-berth.
On a boat like this the typical setup is to have a "Y-valve" which directs the outflow to either the deck pump out fitting, or to a diaphragm pump or macerator, and then to a below the waterline through hull which can be secured in NDZs. All of this equipment is typically installed under the V berth, keeping the hose runs as short as possible. This was the factory setup on the Pearson 34, Cal 33, and O'day 34/35.

An issue with this is that the line can loose vacuum through the deck fitting and "Y-valve", making it hard to pump out. One solution is to put the pump before the "Y-valve", but you run the risk of someone activating the pump without opening the through hull...:puke

Another solution is to plumb a second pump out fitting into the tank, and eliminate the "Y-valve" entirely, and the likelyhood of vacuum leaks.

One last tidbit to minimize smelly hoses; make sure that any and all hoses are run so that they drain back into the holding tank, or through the through hull.
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
On a boat like this the typical setup is to have a "Y-valve" which directs the outflow to either the deck pump out fitting, or to a diaphragm pump or macerator, and then to a below the waterline through hull which can be secured in NDZs. All of this equipment is typically installed under the V berth, keeping the hose runs as short as possible. This was the factory setup on the Pearson 34, Cal 33, and O'day 34/35.

An issue with this is that the line can loose vacuum through the deck fitting and "Y-valve", making it hard to pump out. One solution is to put the pump before the "Y-valve", but you run the risk of someone activating the pump without opening the through hull...:puke

Another solution is to plumb a second pump out fitting into the tank, and eliminate the "Y-valve" entirely, and the likelyhood of vacuum leaks.

One last tidbit to minimize smelly hoses; make sure that any and all hoses are run so that they drain back into the holding tank, or through the through hull.
Hey, thanks very much. This all makes good sense and couldn't have figured it out on my own. We are headed there tomorrow to get this done. The first thing we will do is do a thorough search for any signs of the thru-hull...before drilling a new one. Thanks again!!
 

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If you are planning to install a through hull, then I hope that you have read Maine Sail's EXCELLENT tutorial on the correct way to install backing plates. Do a search for the link.
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
I want to thank everyone for the help and the good discussion on creative techniques. I wanted to close everything out by giving an update on the work. There are a few pictures attached below to show what was done.

All of the current thru-hulls (head intake, head and galley sink in/out) are on the port side of the boat. The engine water intake is center and after near engine. A locker on the starboard side has the tubing for the pump out hose and fresh water loading hose. You can see this in the picture below. I put the black water hole in this locker. I plan to put a Y-valve on the pump out hose and route to macerator pump and thru-hull all in that locker. The picture below should be easier to understand than my wording.

At the end of the day after worrying about drilling a hole in my boat, dealing with all the dust for cutting with the dremel tool, mixing epoxy, etc, it was time to relax with a beer. The wife comes in about that time and says it is Metamucil time....so the last picture is of Beer-amucil. Don't knock it 'til you've tried it...kinda like a beer float...only not...:)
 

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