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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
:mad: :mad:

So, I just drove over 500+ miles to examine a boat that was described by the broker as "the finest example of the model" he has seen in "many many years"

Either he has never seen a nice boat, or he has a serious lack of grasp on reality. Maybe it is "the finest example of the model" when viewed out of his office window.

The boat was a disaster to be blunt. Sure, it had a nice coat of paint...too bad that was what was probably holding it together. I almost paid to have it checked out by a surveyor at $650. Wow, that would have been a waste.

My favorite part. How about the hound for the forestay being fractured and then welded by an apparent shop class reject (clumpy, pieces of the welding rod, failed penetration, obvious heat deformation) I mean, come on, who welds a hound...They cost maybe 30 bucks??? Hmmmm, This piece of metal costs only 30 dollars and keeps the entire mast from collapsing on my skull...Who needs to replace that....I'll just fire up my sears arc welder and give it a few tack welds... that'll be fine...No safety risk there.:rolleyes: Makes you wonder what other quality maintenance was performed that I didn't find. :eek:
 

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ASA and PSIA Instructor
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One of the advantages of working with your own broker, is that brokers will often be more direct with one-another than with a member of the consumer public. A knowledgeable broker may have been able to ferret out the real condition of that boat and have saved you this trip, and could save you many more. as one who may many fruitless tire-kicking trips of my own, during my last search, I should have stuck with a broker...
 

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So, I just drove over 500+ miles to examine a boat that was described by the broker as "the finest example of the model" he has seen in "many many years"

Either he has never seen a nice boat, or he has a serious lack of grasp on reality. Maybe it is "the finest example of the model" when viewed out of his office window.
Boat brokers, real estate brokers, and 3rd tier automobile salesmen have much in common. Their first priority is to get customers to look at the product. They can't work on adjusting the customer's perceptions until they can talk with them while examining the wares. In the effort to get folks to "come in" a (thankfully) small fraction of the community adds so much spin to their description that it becomes completely divorced from reality.

I agree with SF -- a local broker will provide a valuable service. The time and travelling expense savings alone would be worth the money you spend on him, not to mention the reduction in aggravation.
 

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Many times during the year I get called to run a boat for a sea trail. Many reasons why, owner does not have the time or he is unsure of himself handling the boat. I done a few where the widows are selling the boat.

Usually it the sellers broker, prospective buyer and members of his family, surveyor, and myself.

The things I hear come out of brokers mouths. If their lips are moving they are lying and trust your surveyor(as long as you pick him and did not rely on a broker's recommendation.)
 

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SailGunner
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Recent Adventure

I just recently went through the "boat buying" experieince and would say in general, I was dissapointed in the brokers. We looked at boats in a few different locations so we worked with several different brokers. Some brokers were nice and some were like "used car" salesmen. But what was the most dissapointing is that none of the brokers knew much about the boats they were trying to sell. Everytime I would ask a question they would say they would have to check with the owner. If I was brokering a boat I would make sure I knew all the particulars. The best experinece I had was when the broker was so late for the appointment the boat owner showed me the boat - he had all the answers to my questions.
 

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We have been working with a broker from Mcmichaels for a friends boat and he has been nothing but honest

He even had us kill a survey before he wasted the money becasue they found and issue in the deck
 

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:mad: :mad:

So, I just drove over 500+ miles to examine a boat that was described by the broker as "the finest example of the model" he has seen in "many many years"

Either he has never seen a nice boat, or he has a serious lack of grasp on reality. Maybe it is "the finest example of the model" when viewed out of his office window.

The boat was a disaster to be blunt. Sure, it had a nice coat of paint...too bad that was what was probably holding it together. I almost paid to have it checked out by a surveyor at $650. Wow, that would have been a waste.

My favorite part. How about the hound for the forestay being fractured and then welded by an apparent shop class reject (clumpy, pieces of the welding rod, failed penetration, obvious heat deformation) I mean, come on, who welds a hound...They cost maybe 30 bucks??? Hmmmm, This piece of metal costs only 30 dollars and keeps the entire mast from collapsing on my skull...Who needs to replace that....I'll just fire up my sears arc welder and give it a few tack welds... that'll be fine...No safety risk there.:rolleyes: Makes you wonder what other quality maintenance was performed that I didn't find. :eek:
I have had several bad examples. The worst were in Miami/Ft Lauderdale. I feel your pain.

- CD
 

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Dude,

Let me tell you about the broker I never met. I live on the Delaware River, that is as far east as you can get in Pennsylvania. After several emails and telephone conversations I arranged to visit a boat in Holland, Michigan (approx 700 miles). The deal was to call the broker when I got into town and he would lead me to the marina. With the date and time of day established, I arrived, had lunch and gave him a call. He couldn't meet me was his response, but gave me directions to the marina where the boat was stored on the hard. I found the marina and the gate was locked! There was an adjacent marine supply/powerboat dealer that was open and he let me into the yard through his back gate. The broker that never showed up authorized me to go aboard so I borrowed a ladder from the only person in the boatyard (not many people hang out in marinas in December) and had a look. The only good thing that came from that trip is I didn't need a surveyor to tell me I didn't want the boat. I've other stories about bad brokers but I'll save for another day.

If you find a broker you like and trust (ultimately I did) stick with them. They are a rare commoditiy.
 
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