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Hello, I'm in Northern California, sailed a bit growing up and later sailed with my Uncle who lived on a Tartan for 25+ years. Kids are grown so I'm going to buy a boat and enjoy ocean life a bit. Wife and/or Uncle will sail with me with the occasional kid and grandkid.

We are looking for comfort and easy to sail since I may be single handed with wife and family. Uncle and I may sail outside the golden gate and do some fair weather coastal cruising as well. Uncle is a Tartan snob so he gets no vote here.

I have been looking for 3+ months at various types of 35-40' boats (Tartan, Islander, Wauquiez, CAL, Hunter). Hunter 37s look good for what we have planned and there are three for sale locally: an 1989 which is in pretty good condition, a 1991 which is in great condition, and a 1996 which I have not seen yet but looks to be in great condition. The 89 is listed at $50k and the other two are $60k.

I would be interested in opinions, observations, and experience if you have the time. And if you are in Northern CA I would be happy to meet up for a drink or a quick meal to talk sailing.

Cheers....

Dan
 

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Dan, of the boats you listed, the Islander 36 is a popular boat on San Francisco Bay. They have a very active owners association which is a plus. A couple of boats you did not mention are that Catalina 34/36 models. They will fit into your $60k budget and both are very popular as they are stiff and handle the often challenging conditions of the Bay and Northern California coast very well.
 

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Dan, of the boats you listed, the Islander 36 is a popular boat on San Francisco Bay. They have a very active owners association which is a plus. A couple of boats you did not mention are that Catalina 34/36 models. They will fit into your $60k budget and both are very popular as they are stiff and handle the often challenging conditions of the Bay and Northern California coast very well.
Thank you George. I did look at three local Islanders. One was in excellent condition and well cared for but they were all made in the late 1970s. I'm hoping newer boats will require less work. I'm probably going to have to up my budget. What would you suggest in the $80k range?
 

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Thank you George. I did look at three local Islanders. One was in excellent condition and well cared for but they were all made in the late 1970s. I'm hoping newer boats will require less work. I'm probably going to have to up my budget. What would you suggest in the $80k range?
Not saying you should buy an Islander but even a boat from 2000 will need some sort of overhaul already especially in the bay area where the winds takes its toll on boats rigging and sails. Don't look at a boat from the 80-90s as automatically superior to a boat from the 70s. As long as the hull is solid, consider any boat that has been overhauled recently. New standing rigging, sails, wiring, low engine hours, etc. Would be the primary thing I would look at to ensure low future expenses.
 

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Kynntana (Freedom 38)
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To heck with rigging. I heard there's a Freedom 30 for sale in Alameda. Don't know anything about it but think it's in the low 20s. It'll feel like a Catalina 36 inside. Will be super easy to singlehand on SF Bay with a great rig for big winds. We're having our third annual Freedom Rendezvous March 30-31 in Aquatic Park. You're welcome to join us if you'd like to speak with other Freedom owners.
 

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dadio917
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Pretty much every boat will require something. Don't buy one unless you are willing to invest $ and time. New boats will bite you for adding stuff...old boats bite you for fixing the stuff you don't have to buy on the new boat.

Islanders are built well, probably better than new production boats like hunters and B's. Catalina is the best bet on production boats.

In the end....buy a boat someone has loved and taken care of and will be comfortable for you and family.

The Bay is a great place to sail! Lots of cool places to tie up or anchor. Outside the gate is a whole different proposition. A bit wild.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Not saying you should buy an Islander but even a boat from 2000 will need some sort of overhaul already especially in the bay area where the winds takes its toll on boats rigging and sails. Don't look at a boat from the 80-90s as automatically superior to a boat from the 70s. As long as the hull is solid, consider any boat that has been overhauled recently. New standing rigging, sails, wiring, low engine hours, etc. Would be the primary thing I would look at to ensure low future expenses.
Not saying you should buy an Islander but even a boat from 2000 will need some sort of overhaul already especially in the bay area where the winds takes its toll on boats rigging and sails. Don't look at a boat from the 80-90s as automatically superior to a boat from the 70s. As long as the hull is solid, consider any boat that has been overhauled recently. New standing rigging, sails, wiring, low engine hours, etc. Would be the primary thing I would look at to ensure low future expenses.
Great advice, thank you. We did see an updated 1978 Islander 36. Unfortunately is has the original Volvo engine which I'm guessing will need to be replaced ($15-20k?) before going coastal. The boat is listed at $45k. It was clearly meticulously cared for though and absolutely beautiful inside. Here are the refit details:

The chainplates were extended down to the base bulkheads which were reinforced and tabbed to the hull. Extension turnbuckles for the chainplates are visible in the main salon.
In 2007 the hull below the waterline was sanded down to bare fiberglass, all osmotic blisters (non structural) were ground and epoxy filled. The area of the hull forward of the keel was structurally reinforced with fiberglass as a preventative measure and the hull was painted with 5 coats of barrier coat epoxy paint. This work was done by the renown premier shipwright Paul Rosenthal who specializes in bottom refinishing projects. The bottom has not shown any signs of blister recurrence and regular diver maintenance and an appropriate haul-out and bottom painting schedule has been adhered to.
All thru-hulls were replaced with new bronze thru-hulls prior to the bottom refinishing project.
The hull topsides from the waterline to the toe rail were prepped by Paul Rosenthal prior to be painted with Awlgrip by Svendsons Marine.
A spinnaker pole track was installed on the mast with a pad eye traveler.
Eight (8) Stainless Steel 1' diameter keel bolts ranging in length from 8" to 16" were installed.
In 2008 Svendsons Marine replaced the upper and lower spreaders with LE Fever Spreaders. At that time all standing rigging was inspected and deemed to be sound.
A new Harken "Big Boat Series" traveler system was installed in 2008
2008 motor work included; new Racor Fuel Filter, new raw water sea strainer, new raw water pump and new temperature sending unit.
In 2009 a new Raymarine C80 GPS CHartplotter was installed in a NavPod at the binnacle along with a new Raymarine Autopilot control wheel.
The prop shaft was pulled, trued and balanced. It was reinstalled with a new cutlass bearing and the prop was tuned and balanced.
In 2009 the mast was unstepped and all new wiring was installed along with new sheaves and a TriColor light was installed at the masthead. All rig connections were inspected and found to be sound. Mast step was inspected and found to be sound.
In 2011 a new set of Bottom Siders cockpit cushions were added.
In 2012 all new Ultra-leather interior upholstery was installed by Giannola of Sausalito.
New headliners were installed along with dimmable LED recessed lighting.
In 2013 new refrigeration was installed, new battery charger, galvanic isolator, alternator, shore power receptacle along with a new freshwater pump, faucet and holding tank level sender unit.
The teak and holly sole was refinished.
In 2015 a new exhaust mixing elbow was installed.
In 2017 all exterior bright work was refinished.
 

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My first keelboat and Islander 28. Stout...well made much care went into her.
 

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Dan, that Islander 36 sounds like it had a meticulous previous owner. Are you thinking of pulling the trigger? The only reservation I have is the Volvo and that is from a parts standpoint as they are very expensive (as compared to my Kubota). A lot of the other refurbishments are pushing the ten year mark but Svendsen's has been a very good yard for me so they should be still in good shape. about the only other thing (besides rigging and sails) is leaks around hatches, ports, and through bolting (you may want to re-bed things in the future). I personally like the mid thirty foot range for the convenience of double handing in the Bay along the coast. As you can see by my signature, I am a happy Catalina owner and would recommend their 34 or 36 footers. These are popular boats and many get sold even before they get listed. You may want to contact Cruising Yachts in Alameda as they are very good brokers and will know what will shortly be coming on the the market. Good luck and see you on the bay real soon!
 
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