SailNet Community banner

1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello: I'm ready to buy an 36-42' offshore sailboat to spend about 6mos in the Carib. I've got my personal list of boats and have been searching Yachtworld.

Question: I'm considering using John Neal as a Consultant - $750 and 300,000+ miles of bluewater experience - but I'm also wondering if i should just try and find a Trustworthy broker on East coast and let his experience guide me. This will be my first bluewater boat and would like some guidance.

On brokers; does anyone have recommendations on good broker with bluewater experience too? Thoughts on using John Neal + Broker or saving money and using just the broker?

Thanks for your input.
Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,264 Posts
I don't know John Neal at all, so I won't say anything one way or the other. I would however recommend also contacting Bob Perry. I don't know how many miles he has sailed, but his boats probably have millions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
A friend of mine who took two years off to cruise uses Bob Perry's consulting services and was very pleased. he (Bob Perry) also has a very enjoyable blog:

Yacht Design According to Perry

I like the idea of paying for advice without the conflict of a commission. I have worked on commission in the insurance industry for fifteen years. In many cases I refer people to fee-only planners who can give advice without that conflict.

I don't know what your price range is but using your example of $750 for consulting services; that will likely be a fraction of a percent of your final purchase price. It may be money well spent.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,490 Posts
Keep this in mind. If you find a broker to help you locate a boat, they are being paid by the seller, via a split commission. Unless all parties sign a contract disclosing to the contrary, they work for and are accountable to the seller, not you.

For an expensive purchase that you may not feeling confident in knowing what you need to know, I like the idea of paying for your own consultant.
 
  • Like
Reactions: christian.hess

·
Administrator
Joined
·
5,921 Posts
Whatever route you decide to go, it might be in your own best interest to educate yourself as much as possible. Otherwise, you're going on blind faith. I know you're paying an expert a lot of money, but if it was me, I'd at least want to know what questions to ask so as to get the most value from the expert's time and know enough to be able to sift through the advice and make the best possible choice based on how I want to sail.

Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
Excellent point by the prior poster. Educate yourself as much as possible. I am not yet in a position in life to venture much beyond a 2 week summer cruise but i do plan on extended cruising eventually. I find that the first half of "Nigel Calder's Cruising Handbook" does an excellent job of pointing out various design characteristics to be considered when purchasing a cruising yacht.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,490 Posts
Another point of view. The 6 months the OP plans to be in the Caribbean are lost likely going to be entirely coastal cruising. At best a single overnight, here and there, unless you skip past several islands. Weather windows for these light open water passengers are more easily timed too.

If like most, it's only the delivery to/from the Caribbean that may warrant an "offshore" design/build. However there are dozens of hulls not on John Neil's list (such as mine) that make the trip annually.

Buy the boat you will need 90% of the time. Figure out how to deal with the remaining 10%.
 

·
Old enough to know better
Joined
·
4,345 Posts
Another point of view. The 6 months the OP plans to be in the Caribbean are lost likely going to be entirely coastal cruising. At best a single overnight, here and there, unless you skip past several islands. Weather windows for these light open water passengers are more easily timed too.

If like most, it's only the delivery to/from the Caribbean that may warrant an "offshore" design/build. However there are dozens of hulls not on John Neil's list (such as mine) that make the trip annually.

Buy the boat you will need 90% of the time. Figure out how to deal with the remaining 10%.

Yes, there is no need for a blue-water boat for the Caribbean. In fact a good coastal cruiser will get you a lot more boat for your money and likely be easier to sell when you want to get out.

Also is this 6 months, then sell or 6 months every year? If just one year then I personally would not want to invest too much money into a blue water cruiser than could well be very hard to sell afterwords. John Neal has a lot of experience and his advice would likely be worth every penny you gave him, but the Caribbean is mostly island hopping with out even being out of sight of the next island for long. To me before paying someone to help find a boat, go down and charter a boat similar to what you think you might want. Once you do a few charters you will know better than anyone what you want. If you are going to be there for 6 months keep in mind that comfortable living space is really more important than actual sailing ability. As Minnewaska says get a boat that will suite 90% of your sailing and in a 6 month stay in the islands it will mostly be at anchor/mooring/dock, so comfortable state rooms and salon becomes more important. You might want a bit bigger as you may end up with more guests than you expect!
 

·
Registered
Corsair 24
Joined
·
4,594 Posts
Ill take a nickel a post jeje
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,490 Posts
I thought this was just a game of first to 100,000 posts wins.
 

·
bell ringer
Joined
·
5,039 Posts
I feel the order of importance is:

1 - know what you want and what is important to YOU
2 - get a good broker and tell them the stuff in number 1
3 - listen to number 2s suggestion and revise number 1 as needed and start over

if the broker doesn't ask you about number 1 first and instead starts by asking your budget, get another broker
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
458 Posts
Hello: I'm ready to buy an 36-42' offshore sailboat to spend about 6mos in the Carib. I've got my personal list of boats and have been searching Yachtworld.

Question: I'm considering using John Neal as a Consultant - $750 and 300,000+ miles of bluewater experience - but I'm also wondering if i should just try and find a Trustworthy broker on East coast and let his experience guide me. This will be my first bluewater boat and would like some guidance.

On brokers; does anyone have recommendations on good broker with bluewater experience too? Thoughts on using John Neal + Broker or saving money and using just the broker?

Thanks for your input.
Jim
How do you envision working with the consultant? For $750 I doubt he will be traveling with you to look at boats so what do you really get for the fee?

There is also the issue of his personal biases. Is he a full keel guy in a fin keel world? As others have pointed out, there are lots of suitable production boats for the trip that you have described.

Contrary to what you hear, there are lots of good brokers out there. Pick a well known firm that sells what you want to buy. Maybe pick someone in the general area where you expect to buy? As a general rule, you are more apt to find a boat in SE Florida that has sailed where you want to go and has a lot of the needed gear. Just don't pay a premium for worn out stuff.

The issue of a buyers broker is murky in the boat industry compared to real estate. In real estate you sign disclosure forms that you normally don't sign with a yacht broker. However, in both cases it is the seller paying the commission so buyer beware.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
All these comments are worth every penny! Hehe
Excellent posts about buying more for comfort vs extended bluewater passages;that gives me something to think about. FYI; I will be going solo. But, If i REALLY like the extensive cruising thing, maybe i keep going or plan more extensive trips???-->thus needing a true bluewater boat.
I have done some extensive research on boats: here is my top 7 i sent to Consultant:
38-42’ boats
#1 Cabo Rico 38’ early 1990s
#2 Hallberg Rassy late 80s or early 90s
#3 Passport 40 early 90s
#4 Morris
#5 Bristol
#6 Gozzard
#7 Baba-Panda
However, resale will be an important factor too; if the cruising life is not for me.
Thanks all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,490 Posts
......However, resale will be an important factor too; if the cruising life is not for me.....
Best of luck, you have some nice boats on your list.

Selling, however, is almost not in the cards. Everyone I know with a boat for sale over 40ft has had it listed for a couple of seasons already. Buy what you will be happy with at home as well. You will likely own it for years, whether you decide you wish to or not.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Jhildy

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Minnewaska has another good point about the length of time to sell a boat once the season ends--and to be happy to bring it to the home waters---hmmm. That's a nickel;s worth of advice!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
407 Posts
Here is what I would do. First, find a broker and let the broker narrow down your search, deal with the seller's broker, do the market analysis, etc. Yes, your broker will be compensated from the commission on the sale which is paid by the seller, but this is no different than buying a house. Would you pay a consultant to help you find a house? Probably not - you'd use a real estate agent. Tell your broker that you concerned about conflict of interest and make sure that he/she knows not to try to sell any boats he/she is listing.

If you still feel wary of your broker after working with them for a while, then pay a consultant to confirm what your broker is telling you.

Believe it or not, there is a code of ethics for yacht brokers. If you engage one to be a buyer's agent, then they are supposed to represent your interests.

And, full disclosure, I am just joining the ranks of yacht brokers. Not licensed yet, but then I just yesterday got my business cards.
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top