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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello community. I am interested in your feedback on the minor damage I have recently received on moving my boat about 300m across the street to a different boat yard. I am here in Turkey where the common response for this is it should be expected and its not a big deal, but I wonder what would happen if a crane and truck moving company was to produce such results in somewhere like Canada, USA or Australia.

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Here are a few pics of the damage that was done. The hull is aluminium so the cracks are the filler is put over the welds to make things nice and smooth. As some of you may know the process involves sanding the aluminium, priming, filling, sanding, filling, priming and then painting. That is the original process and any of the cracks you see in these pics would also require this.

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In addition to the ones that have cracked, nearly everywhere else they put a strap has done a number on the paint. Maybe it has not broke apart the underlying filler but certainly will require a polish and in most cases new paint.

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As for the lead bulb, well that’s a different story. To get the shape back on the aft end of the torpedo will take some hammering and the gashes in the front will only be able to be flapped and filled.

20210611_113745.jpg


I am curious to know if a moving company in a first world country that has results like this would end up legal battles and insurance claims in order to fix the clients boat, or if this is a common practice and a price to fix these moving related problems is factored into a move?

Thanks for any feedback.

Dennis
 

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Wow!! Thats very saddening and highly irritating for you!!

Things are less expensive in some countries compared to USA and Australia. Theres a reason!
 

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Looks like they're not accustomed to moving such large objects. The rail damage looks to be due to compression. Didn't they use spreader bars to lift the hull with the slings? If the yard you were leaving did the lifting, it is easy to see why you wanted to leave. Since you were leaving, they may not have been over-careful, too. Insurance claims on something like this could go on for quite a while, depending upon the yard. As Mark suggests, that is why some yards are more expensive than others: they have insurance for things like this.
 

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I guess this is a case of you get what you pay for.
I doubt any company in the countries you mentioned would attempt such a move without requiring you to have insurance to cover any damages and have you sign a release, as well.
Nobody wants to take responsibility for their actions these days?
 

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I feel for you. No doubt you knew you were in for a big project here and having others make it bigger doesn’t help. It’s hard to say what would happen here. My first instinct was that one would be told of the risk to the fairing and sign away liability. At least, if that happened, you might have gone to extended measures yourself. The hull chafe, from the strapping, is just wrong.

I know you used the term loosely, but Turkey is a first world country, by its original definition. Ironically.

Whats the long term timeline to expect to be back on the water?
 

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As others have suggested this is not black and white. Most boats movers have you sign an agreement that defines mover responsibility and owner responsibility.
I have seen this go both ways. A few years ago the shackles for the strops touched my hull and took off the paint in two places. The boat yard touched those up with out charging me.
When I moved the boat from Maine on a truck, there was the movers contact and a separate document that spelled out what kinds of damage was covered by the mover and what was not. It recommended talking with my insurance company and ascertaining that the policy covered whatever else could happen. I believe base insurance only partially covered the move and paid for a rider with a pretty big deductible for the rest.

There was some minor damage during the move, (scrapes that looked like stones or something missed the shield and hit the topside) which I paid to have touched up.

Given the size of the boat I would think that the repairs would be a minor expense. Plus some of the damage in the pictures appears to be old damage rather than something that occurred during the move.

Jeff
 

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Yep. In the US, Canada, or Australia, these things would have been covered by the contract and/or insurance. But you are not in the US, Canada, or Australia. You are in Turkey, and you are going to have to deal with this in the "Turkish" way.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Wow!! Thats very saddening and highly irritating for you!!

Things are less expensive in some countries compared to USA and Australia. Theres a reason!
Yes Mark you are certainly correct. Very good example of cheap is expensive. There is something to be said for the general education we receive in n.america that allows us to understand and deal with some fundamental issues and procedures.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yep. In the US, Canada, or Australia, these things would have been covered by the contract and/or insurance. But you are not in the US, Canada, or Australia. You are in Turkey, and you are going to have to deal with this in the "Turkish" way.

Good luck.
Bahahah...the Turkish way. Yep you are right and I suppose so. Two steps forward, one step back. Interesting enough during this boat build EVERYTHING has been done at least twice. Make some furniture...not right, rip it down, make new one. A boat builder is not a boat builder is not a boat builder;) My choice, my boat, will finish it is it but wholly crap, an embarrassing story to tell a professional friend in n.america;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
As others have suggested this is not black and white. Most boats movers have you sign an agreement that defines yard responsibility and owner responsibility.
I have seen this go both ways. A few years ago the shackles for the strops. Touched my hull and took off the paint in two places. The boat yard touched those up with out charging me.
When I moved the boat from Maine on a truck, there was the movers contact and a separate document that spelled out what kinds of damage was covered by the mover and what was not. It recommended talking with my insurance company and ascertaining that the policy covered whatever else could happen. I believe it only was partially covered and paid for a rider with a pretty big deductible for the rest.

There was some minor damage during the move, (scrapes that looked like stones or something missed the shield and hit the topside) which I paid to have touched up.

Given the size of the boat I would think that the repairs would be a minor expense. Plus some of the damage in the pictures appears to be old damage rather than something that occurred during the move.

Jeff
Hi Jeff and thanks for the feed back. Well its a new boat so these are certainly not old damage. I have now accepted that I live in a different planet for the time being and that due diligence, integrity and skill in performing a correct action dont exist here or are certainly different than what we would expect. In our two years here in Turkey building this boat, there is a very evident the common theme is that taking responsibility for one's actions is avoided at all costs:(
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I feel for you. No doubt you knew you were in for a big project here and having others make it bigger doesn’t help. It’s hard to say what would happen here. My first instinct was that one would be told of the risk to the fairing and sign away liability. At least, if that happened, you might have gone to extended measures yourself. The hull chafe, from the strapping, is just wrong.

I know you used the term loosely, but Turkey is a first world country, by its original definition. Ironically.

Whats the long term timeline to expect to be back on the water?
Its a tough thing to see work trashed resulting in more work but this is not the first time during this build. Actually it seems that we have made bad decisions for workers at all stages and they all seem to do things more than once:( Strange. I feel that there are two things learned here in turkey. Drink lots of tea in order to build relationships and pay whatever the top guy wants in order to get things done.
We are addressing interior panels on ceiling and walls to cover up the insulation. This to me should be one of the easier tasks. Electrical and plumbing is done so with fingers crossed we are hoping to get in the water mid July.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I guess this is a case of you get what you pay for.
I doubt any company in the countries you mentioned would attempt such a move without requiring you to have insurance to cover any damages and have you sign a release, as well.
Nobody wants to take responsibility for their actions these days?
You have summed it up!!! Seems regardless what country you are in your last line says it all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Looks like they're not accustomed to moving such large objects. The rail damage looks to be due to compression. Didn't they use spreader bars to lift the hull with the slings? If the yard you were leaving did the lifting, it is easy to see why you wanted to leave. Since you were leaving, they may not have been over-careful, too. Insurance claims on something like this could go on for quite a while, depending upon the yard. As Mark suggests, that is why some yards are more expensive than others: they have insurance for things like this.
Exactly right. Compression. They used spreaders to lift the boat, albiet a bit narrow but they are ok. The problem here for cracking the filler is for the straps that they used to hold on the cradle. Lets just say that the ratchets to tighten the strap are not mean to be pulled on with all the weight of a 200lbs guy. A certain amount of smarts needs to be taken into consideration about how tight something should be.
 

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I find I have to do many things twice... despite planning and care. It seems to be a "law of boat work".... expect to have to do it... or part of the project over again for some reason... Example... running wires... you run them all connected and then notice a shorter or more direct path... and you redo it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I find I have to do many things twice... despite planning and care. It seems to be a "law of boat work".... expect to have to do it... or part of the project over again for some reason... Example... running wires... you run them all connected and then notice a shorter or more direct path... and you redo it.
Yes, boat work is certainly more detailed than a standard square house. The learnings in boat work would be to have a detailed contract with workers/builder that states any do overs would be at the cost of the builder and not require me to buy new material to replace their screw ups;)))
 

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Yes, boat work is certainly more detailed than a standard square house. The learnings in boat work would be to have a detailed contract with workers/builder that states any do overs would be at the cost of the builder and not require me to buy new material to replace their screw ups;)))
No professional "any trade" wants to be micro managed and turned into an "employee" of the owner. If you have a top mechanic they generally know exactly what to do based on training and experience. I know only one such mechanic and he cares for my engine drive refrigeration. Complicated diesel project I would not undertake. I know a good mechanic for that. However you pay a lot for marine work and so it's better to do it yourself in all cases. You have to "learn on the job" and it will take longer. But the results are fine and you learned new things. Plumbing and electrical installation are DIY. Engineering design of MEP systems should be done by an engineer. I installed the Espar... parts supplied by a dealer. Works fine. Mechanical breakdowns I return the unit to a dealer for service.

As much as I try to make the yard understand to call me when they haul or launch my boat... it seems that this is something they do want... if they can avoid it.... the owner present at haul and launch. In 36 years I can count the times I was present on my fingers... and one of them was when I was living aboard. They're sneaky! I discovered some minor damage when they moved the boat once.
 

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Hello community. I am interested in your feedback on the minor damage I have recently received on moving my boat about 300m across the street to a different boat yard. I am here in Turkey where the common response for this is it should be expected and its not a big deal, but I wonder what would happen if a crane and truck moving company was to produce such results in somewhere like Canada, USA or Australia.

View attachment 139595


Here are a few pics of the damage that was done. The hull is aluminium so the cracks are the filler is put over the welds to make things nice and smooth. As some of you may know the process involves sanding the aluminium, priming, filling, sanding, filling, priming and then painting. That is the original process and any of the cracks you see in these pics would also require this.

View attachment 139596

View attachment 139597

View attachment 139598

View attachment 139599

In addition to the ones that have cracked, nearly everywhere else they put a strap has done a number on the paint. Maybe it has not broke apart the underlying filler but certainly will require a polish and in most cases new paint.

View attachment 139600

View attachment 139601

View attachment 139602

View attachment 139603

As for the lead bulb, well that’s a different story. To get the shape back on the aft end of the torpedo will take some hammering and the gashes in the front will only be able to be flapped and filled.

View attachment 139604


I am curious to know if a moving company in a first world country that has results like this would end up legal battles and insurance claims in order to fix the clients boat, or if this is a common practice and a price to fix these moving related problems is factored into a move?

Thanks for any feedback.

Dennis
 

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I've moved boats by truck across the North American continent and up and down the east coast of the USA. I've never had any damage like that. If I did, I would definitely negotiate that the responsible party fix it or I would open a claim with my insurance, if not with the legal authorities to report the accident. BTW, if that's minor damage, what's major??
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I've moved boats by truck across the North American continent and up and down the east coast of the USA. I've never had any damage like that. If I did, I would definitely negotiate that the responsible party fix it or I would open a claim with my insurance, if not with the legal authorities to report the accident. BTW, if that's minor damage, what's major??
Thanks for the feedback. Yes I am in a different country with different rules. This image is from where the truck turned too sharp and hit the back. The boat was on the truck facing backwards so the wide aft of the boat was exposed to the cab of the truck:(
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