SailNet Community banner
21 - 40 of 205 Posts

·
.
Joined
·
1,000 Posts
you guys with your surveyors are soo funny...

we here have none of that, really we don't....if you're dumb enough to get fooled by someone selling you a boat..your problem...most people that buy a sailboat, know minimally what they need to know to see if it's good or not...if they can't there is allways a friend that helps


here anyone buying a boat does their own "survey"..none of that stuff here...

Looks like stuff to protect you from you, by not having you do what you should do.....makes sense???

Imagine if to get my boat insured I neded to get a surveyor...ahaha that's funny...you guys are soo lazy...even need to hire a guy to look at a bota for you...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,304 Posts
Boat US did not require a survey on my J24 only good photos that showed the boat

And older J24 can be a real nightmare of core problems and for example if you look at one that has been frozen all winter things will seem to fine till it thaws out and the core turns back to mush


I think a survey is a good thing if you dont know were the warts are on boat brand X and does give a more objective look at the boat


The one thing i have nevr liked is that the survey person has nothing to lose if he misses something :rolleyes:
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,819 Posts
I have an agreed value policy (it's and old boat) thru USAA.
Yep you must be under their window or had it prior to their changes in yacht Policies..

I too have USAA for everything except for my boat. They will not insure bigger more expensive boats anymore. Mine is insured for 70k agreed and they won't touch it.. I keep asking!! I'm currently with Amica..
 

·
Courtney the Dancer
Joined
·
3,970 Posts
Great post SD, wish my son had it two weeks ago when he bought his first boat. Fortunately he found a great surveyor (Eberle?) in NC. I vote for this to be a sticky in Buying a Boat (do I get a vote here?).

John
 

·
Aeolus II
Joined
·
670 Posts
Very nice !!

After reading a bit about what people think is or isn't necessary when going to look at a boat... I decided to put together this thread.
This is a wonderful set of tips. I am not in tghe market for a boat but have copied and saved this for future use. Maybe one day I will be looking and this might be handy.
 

·
Telstar 28
Joined
·
992 Posts
Discussion Starter · #29 ·
A couple of points...

I didn't mention asking about the service receipts or getting an official survey done, since those are the steps after you decide you want the boat. This tip is pretty much written to deal with everything up to the point where you decide to push ahead and make an offer or not. :)

Yes, IMHO, you really need to get a survey. However, if you've done this part right, you should have at least a pretty good idea of what to expect on the survey.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,192 Posts
you guys with your surveyors are soo funny...

we here have none of that, really we don't....if you're dumb enough to get fooled by someone selling you a boat..your problem...most people that buy a sailboat, know minimally what they need to know to see if it's good or not...if they can't there is allways a friend that helps

here anyone buying a boat does their own "survey"..none of that stuff here...

Looks like stuff to protect you from you, by not having you do what you should do.....makes sense???

Imagine if to get my boat insured I neded to get a surveyor...ahaha that's funny...you guys are soo lazy...even need to hire a guy to look at a bota for you...
SD, Good info in your post as well as some of the follow-ups from others.

Giu, I actually agree with you to a point.
It wasn't too many years ago that sailors, at least the ones I knew, were in general a lot more competent and self sufficient than the average boater today. At least that's my observation.

There are probably a lot of very different reasons for this. Among them would be the development of the GPS system or the fact that there is a glut of cheap used small vessels.
Also, I think that insurance has help to make it easier for people to neglect their personal responsibility.
I see cases often where someone expects the insurance to pay for a new rig when the cause of failure was a 20+ year old chainplate or U-bolt that caused the dismasting. Even people that are in the marine industry, used their boat hard, should have known better and should have inspected and replaced the offending parts.

Anyway, there are a lot more people on the water these days and there is nothing necessarily wrong with that. Hell, it drives an industry. A lot of people make their livings based partly on the fact that anyone can just go buy a boat and go sailing in relative comfort and safety without having to go to the trouble of becoming sailors.

Boy, when I read that, it sounds harsh. I don't really mean it that way.:eek:

Sailing, Cruising, Boating, Yachting, whatever you want to call it, is a lot more obtainable than it used to be.
Technology has made learning how to do real navigation unnecessary. There are so many incredible products and services out there we don't really have to do much ourselves anymore.
EPIRBs and the Coast Guard are a pretty good backup plan if you stay close to shore, right? :(

I applaud SD's efforts to get people to stick their heads into those lockers and wiggle those shafts and to climb that rigging and knock on their hulls with little plastic hammers. And I would venture to guess that many of the participants here at Sailnet are pretty handy. But I fear that in general, the vast majority of boaters in the US would have a real hard time performing tasks that a boater 30 years ago would have considered basic.
 

·
Telstar 28
Joined
·
992 Posts
Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Knotty-

True, many are far less skilled than those who were boating several decades ago... but if we hope for the masses to return to a shadow of those skilled sailors, we need to start someplace.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,146 Posts
Speaking of surveys and to add to the list.

If a boat is interesting enough to you to do all this work, in advance of coming to the boat to begin with - have the owner's last survey sent to you. It can be used as a checklist - and furthermore you can use it with your surveyor (if boat passes your inspection) to verify that previous issues have been addressed. It'll also demonstrate the level of care the PO had with the boat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Damm! I wish I had read all this 12 hours and 500 miles ago! A saw a winner today, and am making an offer in the morning, but all this would have helped a lot. HALF of this would have helped a lot!

Still, I did giver her a very good looking over - to the best of my ability, and of course the offer will be survey contingent.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,528 Posts
Very good thread Dawg, I'll refer to this thread next time I'm in the market for a boat and it will be helpful in keeping up my boat.

But do you ever sleep or work?:confused: you posted this at 4am and have been on line all day.:D
 

·
Tartan 37C
Joined
·
501 Posts
Yep you must be under their window or had it prior to their changes in yacht Policies..

I too have USAA for everything except for my boat. They will not insure bigger more expensive boats anymore. Mine is insured for 70k agreed and they won't touch it.. I keep asking!! I'm currently with Amica..
My coverage is through USAA, they are now selling Markels "Helmsman Yacht Insurance" on the larger vessels they had stopped covering in-house. My cost from USAA/Markel was 1/3 of what Boat US quoted and is an agreed value policy with twice the liability the Boat US was offering.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,819 Posts
My coverage is through USAA, they are now selling Markels "Helmsman Yacht Insurance" on the larger vessels they had stopped covering in-house. My cost from USAA/Markel was 1/3 of what Boat US quoted and is an agreed value policy with twice the liability the Boat US was offering.
I'll call them tomorrow! I bought two years ago and at the time they were not taking any more yacht policies for bigger boats! Amica is EXPEN$IVE..

Thanks for the heads up!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,394 Posts
I'm going to make a generalized no, I'm not looking for business from anybody statement.
http://www.sailnet.com/forums/buying-boat/39218-special-interest-declaration-2.html#post237459

All of the above are VERY good policies and procedures.
If EVERYONE that was looking at a hole in the water to throw money into followed the advise above, the world would be a better place and we'd have pretty sunsets too.

Alas,
Thats not the case.
I find MANY potential owners of both sail and powerboats looking at some real junk. Unsafe, unseaworthy POS's that had they followed even some of the advise posted above, they would have never laid out cash, or in some cases, "broke the dream".

I'm finding people have purchased, without survey in one case, a 30 ft SeaRay that had the motor mount stringers coming apart in my hand.

Another party bought a 38ft Trojan where the hull/deck joint was repaired with automotive bondo. (about a 6 foot chunk) They paid top dollar too... Why? as per the new owner "its a Trojan!"

I see horror stories as I come in after the fact for an insurance survey, where there is a lot of "pressure" (pffft, like that matters to me) to "write it nice".
Needless to say, that doesn't happen. Not with me.
And, its getting worse, not better. The economy is forcing SOME people to to put the boat up for sale, most times after sitting idle for some time, as we all know its the deathnell of any watercraft.
 

·
Tartan 27' owner
Joined
·
5,238 Posts
Not to answer the Portagee's question but the reason there are Marine Surveyors in this country is for a number of reasons. #1 is such that the first time keel boat buyer will have an approximate idea of what is wrong with the boat they love but happens to be in a bad state. Many first time buyers do not even know that the boat they want to love has a stuffing box or a cooling water impeller on their engine much less what function a chain plate plays in keeping a rig aloft. #2 is to protect insurers from perhaps well intended people from buying non-seaworthy craft that will fall apart on them since they did not check out everything on the boat (CP's examples illustrate this). #3 is to keep people like SD and Mainesail in line so that even if they are not actually Marine Surveyors the boats they insure are deemed really seaworthy by someone else.
That said, a first time buyer could find themselves scratching their heads at this thread and asking themselves what a 'multimeter' or moisture detector is. This tread is a good attempt to alert folks as to the depth of discovery one should take when buying a boat.
The same rules apply when buying a boat as a house or home: caveat emptor, or buyer beware. The more knowledgeable the buyer, the better of they are; like second or third etc. boat owners. For first time buyers there are a whole lot of pitfalls they can stumble into and the insurance industry knows this and supports the idea of Marine Surveyors.
 

·
Telstar 28
Joined
·
992 Posts
Discussion Starter · #39 · (Edited)
I do sleep, just not a whole lot. :) I do work, and wish I had been on-line all day. I was actually snaking out a clogged sewer line for a friend... UGH... next time I have to do that, I'll trade ya... :) It's almost as bad as working on the head on a boat.

BTW, updated the OP in this thread...
Very good thread Dawg, I'll refer to this thread next time I'm in the market for a boat and it will be helpful in keeping up my boat.

But do you ever sleep or work?:confused: you posted this at 4am and have been on line all day.:D
 
21 - 40 of 205 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top