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Inland Sailor & Instructo
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In reading the helpful list, what different thougts come to mind when looking at a ~30-ft boat with diesel that's been only on freshwater?
 

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Sailingdog
a big thank you. my wife and I are going to start kicking some tires in search of a sub 10 year old boat in the 40 ft. range and even though her father, a very meticulous surgeon and lifelong sailor, did not have nearly as comprehensive a list (with reasons you are doing this) to give me.
Thanks again
 

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Just A Member
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I am looking at a larger boat and this is going to make my mind up for me. I am going to order one tonight. This is the reason I joined Sailnet. THANK YOU...
 

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OK, this thread helped tremendously in many ways but is making me reconsider whether to buy a day sailor or one large enough to live on?
 

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Try starting your own thread with your specific questions, I'm sure you'll get some more help.
 

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The boat inspection trip tips remains thoughtful, timeless advice. A good reminder of the responsibility anyone with limited resources should accept when looking for a used boat. It is also a reminder of how much time it will take. I got tired just reading it!

I suspect few brokers expect such lengthy pre-survey inspections.

I suggest it makes sense, if you are scheduling to visit a boat, that you inform the broker or seller that your inspection will take "quite some time." Explain that you will not do any heavy handed, invasive or damaging testing (ice pick, drill, etc.), but you plan to take your time. Offer that they can surely wait or leave you with the boat and you will call them when you are finished. Otherwise, they might expect you are going to "just look it over before deciding on a survey" and after a while, start putting pressure on you to finish up.

Even if they have nothing to hide, they may well have other things scheduled for their day. Having a clear expectation at the onset is important.
 

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The boat inspection trip tips remains thoughtful, timeless advice. A good reminder of the responsibility anyone with limited resources should accept when looking for a used boat. It is also a reminder of how much time it will take. I got tired just reading it!

I suspect few brokers expect such lengthy pre-survey inspections.

I suggest it makes sense, if you are scheduling to visit a boat, that you inform the broker or seller that your inspection will take "quite some time." Explain that you will not do any heavy handed, invasive or damaging testing (ice pick, drill, etc.), but you plan to take your time. Offer that they can surely wait or leave you with the boat and you will call them when you are finished. Otherwise, they might expect you are going to "just look it over before deciding on a survey" and after a while, start putting pressure on you to finish up.

Even if they have nothing to hide, they may well have other things scheduled for their day. Having a clear expectation at the onset is important.
That's some good advice as well.
 

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Some really great tips and information here. They are going with us on our trip east, along with Don Casey's book and Marine Survey 101 tips. We're also packing super-duper surveyor tools
(we'll see how that goes) and both a still and video camera.

And when we get to Annapolis, we're going to enjoy a painkiller or two. That's something I KNOW we can accomplish! :D

Not sure which I'm looking more forward to.....:rolleyes:
 

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C&C24, Hamilton Harbour
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Very helpful "sticky".

I would second dwblueblue suggestion about clarifying expected time to be there. Unless a deal braker is found fairly quickly....

If the boat is in my close proximity I would make 2 trips: first to meet the owner and do a preliminary check. If the boat checks out ok I would go 2nd time clearly communicating the amount of time needed.

m
 

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Hello Everyone,
I'm new to Sailnet. I've been looking at purchasing a boat, and am going to take a long drive to go and see the boat in person, all your suggestions are great for this. Thanks also for the repair receipts comment. Since I haven't seen the boat in person, just in photos, I can see that the bow looks to have been damaged and repaired. The repair looks 3 to 4 feet in length, my question is: How can I tell if the bow has been repaired properly, and that it will withstand sailing conditions?
 
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