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Found a boat that seems right for us. It's a bit of a drive (7 hours) so want to make sure it's worth the trip. One thing caught my attention in an otherwise good survey. I'm not sure what it means, how bad it may be. Opinions Please.

"The chain plates appear secure - although there is some wood rot and delamination to the bulkhead securing the starboard side chainplate, and some repairs are recommended."
 

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I'll start at the beginning. The shrouds are the wires that keep the mast from collapsing to one side or the other. Chainplates connect the shrouds (and other standing rigging) to strong points on the boat. Frequently, the shroud chainplates run through the deck are connected to structural bulkheads. Since they go through the deck, they often start to leak, allowing water to get at the bulkheads. Since bulkheads are frequently made of plywood, the water causes them to rod and the glue to go bad, causing the layers of the plywood to separate (delaminate).

This may be very bad. If the chainplate rips through the weakened bulkhead, the mast will likely fall down. This is expensive, but also potentially fatal for people near the mast, and can sometimes sink the boat.

The easiest DIY repair would be to grind out the bad portions of the bulkhead and replace the ground out portion with layers of fiberglass, then fair (fill) and paint the now-unsightly bulkhead. More aesthetically pleasing repairs are more difficult. My understanding is that this is well within the reach of most folks, skill-wise.
 

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Survey says wood is rotting due to water intrusion. If left to continue , the previous post described it....the mast can fall. Chances are the water may be damaging the chain plates material itself depending on the construction of the whole system.

it can be fixed.....it must be fixed . Every boats chainplates are done differently so your repairs are specific to your boat. Yes most can be DYI. Not a cheap fix though material costs probably less tha $1k , but that’s a real guess.

I wouldn’t buy unless this gets fixed. Sometimes rotting bulkheads lead to other unseen issues. Once fixed they will have opened this up?
 

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who is the maker of the boat? Some boats/designs have chainplate maintenance possibilities, and others just ignore the fact that wet boats and sorry construction are not for chainplates and will need replacement/repair

Either way, they need to be repaired/replaced properly to use the boat and i am with Chef, they should be replaced and inspected by a knowledgeable person BEFORE you buy it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
who is the maker of the boat? Some boats/designs have chainplate maintenance possibilities, and others just ignore the fact that wet boats and sorry construction are not for chainplates and will need replacement/repair

Either way, they need to be repaired/replaced properly to use the boat and i am with Chef, they should be replaced and inspected by a knowledgeable person BEFORE you buy it.
It is a HInterhoeller C&C Frigate 36
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Update: So I spoke with the seller and the entire bulkhead has been replaced since the survey was completed. A more recent survey made no reference to any problem related to the chainplate or bulkhead. However the survey was for insurance purposes only, not for purchase inspection purposes. Thoughts? Is this still a red flag? Go look at the boat? Other concerns? Things to look for?

Thanks :)
 

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I concur. Professional survey
 

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your own survey with someone versed in fiberglass repairs and rigging, not just a "regular" surveyor.
 

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If there was enough water coming in to rot the bulkhead at the chainplates, I would not be surprised to find that the deck in that area had wet and possibly rotted coring. That can be a PIA (and or $$) to fix.
 
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