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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Help! As I was hoisting the outboard off my dinghy getting ready to put it away for the winter, the snap shackle I was using opened and I dropped it in the briny water of the Potomac river, DOH!!! :eek: (Ever had that little voice in the back of your head saying you should be getting help and should secure it better, yeah, don't ignore that voice!)

So after it sunk to the bottom I was able to scavenge up a grappling hook and fish it out. It is a 15hp Yamaha 2-stroke. I brought it home after thoroughly washing it off with fresh water. I removed both spark plugs and got most of the water out of the cylinders. Now it is drying overnight.

What should I do to save it and save myself from having to buy a new outboard?
 

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If it was not in for very long, let it dry, start it in go from there! Seen a few others go overboard, and they all started back up!

Two days ago, I got my keys back after they got kicked into puget sound from my finger pier, two yrs ago my Cell fell out of my shirt pocket, as I put it in the picket saying to self, button the pocket, lean over to tighten the last nut on the rigging I was adjusting, plop, pop, plunk! in it goes to puget sound!

marty
 

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You should be okay if you rinsed it out well and then dried it off...and then sprayed it with WD40. ;) Two-strokes are incredibly tough beasties.
 

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Start it as soon as you can. In fact it should have been started as soon as it was rinsed out.

Eric
 

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Discussion Starter #6
You should be okay if you rinsed it out well and then dried it off...and then sprayed it with WD40. ;) Two-strokes are incredibly tough beasties.
Gotta do the WD 40 tomorrow then, I did not think of that.
 

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You might want to put a little extra oil in the mix and be sure to warm up the engine compleatly to remove all water.
 

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Got a bit of experience with two strokes and water, best thing is to wash it out, use wd-40 or any other water displacer on the electronics especially and then let it dry.
Particularly with salt or brackish water, it's best not to let it dry without a complete rinsing to get the salt out.
I'm normally in fresh water so don't have to worry about drying, just pull the starter cord a few times to flush the cylinders, dry the plugs and go.

ken.

edit:
link shows where the wet two stroke experience comes in:

Picasa Web Albums - ken - water run

That day I had a messed up leg so took pics instead of playing.



Ken.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Got a bit of experience with two strokes and water, best thing is to wash it out, use wd-40 or any other water displacer on the electronics especially and then let it dry.
Particularly with salt or brackish water, it's best not to let it dry without a complete rinsing to get the salt out.
I'm normally in fresh water so don't have to worry about drying, just pull the starter cord a few times to flush the cylinders, dry the plugs and go.

ken.

edit:
link shows where the wet two stroke experience comes in:

Picasa Web Albums - ken - water run



That day I had a messed up leg so took pics instead of playing.



Ken.
That is classic! I bet you would have good experience with two strokes and water.


How often do you not make it?
 

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Plenty of good advice. I had a similar experience several years ago, except I didn't have the excuse of a snapped shackle. I was sailing with a friend and lifting the outboard from the tender onto the deck of the boat (a maneuvre I had performed numerous times) when it all went pear shaped. One of the tender lines came loose and the tender moved away from the boat. To prevent both myself and the outboard (a 15hp Mariner) from going overboard, I had to drop the outboard. I watched aghast as it disappeared below the waves. Then imagine my surprise when it reappered briefly, buoyed up by the air trapped in the motor casing! Fortunately, I had the presence of mind to grab it and avoided the embarrassment of telling my friend that his engine was lost in 40 feet of water......

The old WD40 and drying out trick worked just fine and the outboard lived to tell the tale for many more years!

Stuart
 

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might be good idea to drain carb and fuel tank just in case water sipped in, it wont take much water to smess to fuel
 

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That is classic! I bet you would have good experience with two strokes and water.


How often do you not make it?

Actually there are actually only a couple of incomplete runs a week. Most common if we try to run the whole length of the lake because you have to make a couple turns, and they don't like turning on water. Need real gradual input, and it's easy for a ski to lift off the water and flop over too far then bite hard and dump you.

It is fun, more enjoyable than a jet ski, and the best use for a snowmobile I can think of! (I hate snow!)

No life jackets because we have plenty of people around and a boat at the ready all the time.

Ken
 

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If it were me, I'd skip the wd40 and use something like Corrosion-X.

I became aware of the product because its commonly used to treat the interior of airframes to prevent corrosion. I plan to clean all my diesel and treat all the exposed metal I can find on the boat with Corrosion-X over this winter.
 

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Corrosion-X is great as an anti-corrosive spray, but it is a bit too heavy and sticky to be any good for treating an engine that has been dunked in water.
If it were me, I'd skip the wd40 and use something like Corrosion-X.

I became aware of the product because its commonly used to treat the interior of airframes to prevent corrosion. I plan to clean all my diesel and treat all the exposed metal I can find on the boat with Corrosion-X over this winter.
 

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Cell phone, not engine, but good info to know...

My cell phone accidentally went into a bucket of salt water and was there for an hour or so. I got my vacuum cleaner, turned it one and put the cell phone in front of the hose, so that the biggest opening in the case was up against the end of the vacuum hose. Now there was other air entering the vacuum; the cell phone did not block the flow of air completely. I left the room and let it run for a few hours.

I figured that I could suck all the water away. I repeated the process with other small opening in the cell phone, but for a lesser time on those other holes.

And you know what, it worked!! The cell phone worked again.
 

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It is allready a bit to MUCH TIME the motor needs to run as saltwater will rust the crankshaft journals and all the spray in the world will not lube these areas without the motor running
 

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Corrosion-X is great as an anti-corrosive spray, but it is a bit too heavy and sticky to be any good for treating an engine that has been dunked in water.

A lot of corrosion sprays could also leave a coating on internal engine parts preventing proper operation of the reed valves, carb parts, and possibly the rings and seals. You don't want to spray WD-40 directly into the carb or crank case because it will also displace or strip the oil from the bearings.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I ended up taking apart the carb to drain and clean it and letting the whole rig dry overnight. I was able to get it started on the first pull after putting it all back together. I let it run about 10 minutes at a high throttle setting, but was having trouble keeping it running at idle. I suspect I may need to just adjust some of the carb settings to get it running smoothly again, but it seems to be none the worse for the wear. Time will tell.
 

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If the carb settings were right before then you have some other problem. Perhaps corrosion starting in the idle jet orifice.
Or just a piece of junk.
 
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