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Discussion Starter #1
Happy Monday everyone!

I have been sailing for about 3 years now, and usually with 22ft boats. I am currently away from my sailing center and with this time off from sailing, I'd like to increase my knowledge about sailing. I've been reading some books, but I don't think these reads really encapsulate the knowledge I'm trying to gain..

In the future, I'd like to do some day trips with larger boats. Is there a good book that goes over how to navigate/cruise/overall boat knowledge that I could be reading to prepare me in the future?

Thanks!
-Cory
:svoilier:
 

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Oh. You said "day trips" not cruising.

Meh. Read 'em all. It won't hurt.
 
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I have an entire book case in my office dedicated to boat books.

If I were to suggest 1 all around reference book, I think it would be "Chapman's Piloting and Seamanship". Mine is a 1959 edition that my grandfather used, but the most current edition is the 67th 2013 edition.

I also have a good book on chartwork that explains everything nicely and includes numerous exercises that you can practice with and become proficient. I have lent it out to a couple of people who were eager to learn navigation. "Small craft piloting & Coastal Navigation by A E Saunders".

For meteorology, I would recommend "Reeds Maritime Meteorology". It's a bit pricey but is very in depth.

Check out this link
www.nauticalmind.com
 

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I'll add to your list as well. Even though the thread title says Navigation and Seamanship...it's pointless if you can't also maintain/understand the vessel systems. So I would throw in:

Nigel Calder's Boatowner's Mechanical and Electrical Manual (worth every penny)

And anything from John Vigor

That and the books already mentioned should round out what you don't get from hands-on education.
 

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Oops, I forgot the most important one, maybe because it was too obvious, but no boat library should be without "The International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea 1972".

It can be purchased for about $10 or printed out in pdf.
 

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There is nothing wrong with any of the material listed above. All good stuff.

I would start with Beth Leonard's The Voyager's Handbook. It is good solid material presented in an easy to read, approachable fashion.

For weather I concur with reading Reed's, although if you have Internet access read Frank Singleton's articles on MailASail first.

For maintenance Nigel's book is really good for basics. Nigel also has a book on navigation and charts that is basically an annotated version of Chart #1. Recommended.

Definitely Brion Toss' The Rigger's Apprentice.

I've been sailing a very long time. I've bought, read, and weeded out a lot of books. Those above still have room on my boat.
 

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...

Definitely Brion Toss' The Rigger's Apprentice....
I heard a podcast interview in which he said he's writing an updated version that corrected some stuff. I cherish my signed copy.
 
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Is there a good book that goes over how to navigate/cruise/overall boat knowledge that I could be reading to prepare me in the future?
Reeds Skippers Handbook is exactly what you're looking for. It provides a lot of reliable information, attractively presented in a small package.

IMO, Heavy Weather Avoidance and Route Design: Concepts and Applications of 500 Mb Charts, as recommended by Donna, is far too advanced/complicated for beginner sailors.

Cory has expressly said that he wants to do some day trips, not plan and execute an ocean crossing. The KISS principle applies.
 

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Is there a good book that goes over how to navigate/cruise/overall boat knowledge that I could be reading to prepare me in the future?
Reeds Skippers Handbook is exactly what you're looking for. It provides a lot of reliable information, attractively presented in a small package.
I'll have to check this one out, it's not in my library.

I have a few of Reeds titles, but have not read this one.
 

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Just my opinion

I also have a good book on chartwork that explains everything nicely and includes numerous exercises that you can practice with and become proficient. I have lent it out to a couple of people who were eager to learn navigation. "Small craft piloting & Coastal Navigation by A E Saunders".
This book is perhaps somewhat dated (my copy dates from 1982). More to the point, I think it contains too much theory for most students: a reflection of the author's background as a Power Squadron classroom instructor rather than a practical sailor. Finally, I really dislike the non-standard plotting symbols described in Appendix F and used throughout the book (as well as Sail Canada's coastal navigation course); why re-invent the wheel?
 

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Lockjaw, I had to go downstairs to my office to double check that I quoted the right title after reading the above post. Mine has a copyright of 1990, which is old, but I don't think that matters much when it comes to chartwork?

In my edition each chapter is accompanied by a series of exercises and problems the reader can challenge himself with.

With this book, a person could start the winter with no knowledge of chartwork, read through it, do the exercises and by spring they'd be plotting at a fairly high level.

To me it's the exercises that makes this book perfect for beginners.
 

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I'll just add that when you start collecting these books, consider electronic editions, where available. Easy to carry them along with you on board for reference. The idea of retiring on-board is getting more and more real for me, but the volume and weight of my nautical library is somewhat dismaying. But then, I started collecting some of them long before there were eBooks.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Haha thanks Lock for the advice.

It's true that I said 'day trips', but hopefully one day I'll set sail on a long passage. I just don't want to get too far ahead of myself.
 

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Haha thanks Lock for the advice.

It's true that I said 'day trips', but hopefully one day I'll set sail on a long passage. I just don't want to get too far ahead of myself.
Normally I'd agree with not getting ahead of yourself. I get what Lockjaw is saying about the level of some of the books, HOWEVER, with weather especially, it's knowledge you can use in your everyday life outside of sailing. I'm the non-scientific type who needs time for things to sink in so I consider it getting a head start. Despite being a textbook, Reeds seems easy for me to understand without talking down to me. Maybe I'm getting disciplined in my old age.
 
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