SailNet Community banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi all!, I have an American Mariner 23 and have heard of using the boom as a
gin pole to raise the mast.It involves using the backstay.Anyone know how this is done? I'm hoping to use a system which does not use an " A " frame or a gin
pole.Hope someone has an idea as to how exactly this is done.
Thanks in advance, Porbeagle
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
148 Posts
I'm not familiar with your boat, but may be able to offer some insight. On my V222 I am able to lift the mast by hand. Stepping up onto the cabin top from the cockpit is tough, but I find it doable. On my Chrysler 26 there is no way I could lift the mast alone, so I have to use a gin pole. The Chrysler uses the boom as the gin pole. There is a hole in the boom end and a hole in the mast step. A pin is used in the two holes, and the jib sheet is used to stabilize the boom and mast. A briddle is rigged on each side for this. It is way easier to see than explain, so do a Google search. The main halyard is taken through a block on top of the gin pole, and is used to do the lifting (often attached to the mainsheet or some other means of gaining a mechanical advantage. There are many ways to do this, just find what works for you. I plan on making a dedicated gin pole with a brake winch for my Chrysler.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
830 Posts
With. "P" dimension of 23.3' listed on SBD, what would. you need a gin pole for ? ;)

Probably a trailer-sailer, no?
Best wthere would be to step the mast into a big tree, hoist it far as ya can, and pull the. trailer w/boat under it; plop it down and secure shrouds. :D Barring That; mebbe best to figger a way tosimply foot it and walk . up? Couldn'tweigh much more tthan 80# My rig runs closer to 200#, so a gin is needed. I simply lashed the helloutta it at the mast base/vang hoop. Nary ba squidge of movement! :) It was the side stay bridles that I err'd on and could a used better/less stretchy line for the gin stays;)

Main and jib halyards to the deck @ beam to stabilize, tack off the backstay and shove her up. Might need a ramp or summat to climb the cabin top; but you'll. figger that. out:D


Best,
Paul
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Kenr74 and deltaten, Thanks for the response. Yes there are many ways to get er up,and
I have youtubed and searched lots.This particular mast is heavy, very heavy,and I am
concerned about raising and lowering it while underway (bridges) solo.Yes, simple enough
with any of the systems shown on youtube or described on sailnet,but I am interested in
learning about something which does not require me to carry a gin pole or A frame on the
boat,and uses the BACKSTAY to raise the mast using the boom that I have.(the mast and
tabernacle has no device from the manufacturer allowing me to use my boom.)The step
is slotted and I can pin the mast of course,But I wonder how would I get er up using the
BACKSTAY and BOOM.I'm 70 and have an injury so lifting is out.The admiral can't lift either.If I don't solve this,I will go with a gin pole,and the usual.I just hoped someone
had heard of the backstay method.But thanks very much for your quick response guys.
Porbeagle
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
148 Posts
Using the backstay the mast is obviously going forward. The problem then becomes the side stays. I think most are a bit aft of the mast, so you will have to loosen or disconnect them. Not impossible, but more complexity. Take a look at the Mcgregor mast raising system. It uses a dedicated gin pole, but it is not unwieldly at all. Some people keep it attached on deck while they sail so they can lower the mast underway like you say you would like to do.
 

·
Freedom isn't free
Joined
·
3,057 Posts
its really not hard to use the boom as a gin pole, the deal is you must have a place for the mast to rest forward when its down... The other thing that restricts you from doing it that way is how the shrouds run. If it's a typical trailerable, (can't tell from sailboatdata info), the spreaders are swept back, and there is 1 lower, 1 upper... so the shrouds won't reach to the chainplates with the mast tilted forward (they are designed to be raised from aft up where they are slack while the mast is down laying aft)...

If I may suggest, a whisker pole might be an alternative, lifted while the mast hangs off the transom from some kind of mast upper. That orientation might be the easiest way.

Better yet might be an a-frame rigged with light aluminum poles that can stay on the forward deck (perhaps attached permanently to the toerail)... then use a quick release pin for the forestay. On a 23 like that you should be able to rig something to the apex of the A frame to haul the mast up from the cockpit.

Not sure why you are lowering and raising the mast on the water that much on a trailer sailor, but OK.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,073 Posts
Our mast rests on supports while traveling. The rear-most support has a roller. I pick up the base, roll it rearward and drop it into the tabernacle. Then I have a dedicated gin pole, about 7 feet long, that contains everything I need to attach it. A saddle to capture the mast and a ratchet strap to hold it there. A block and tackle with 4:1 purchase, temporary guys to keep the pole upright and a line with snap shackel to hold the roller furler off the deck. On the mast already is a set of temporary shrouds that are tensioned by the main halyard. To complete the ensemble is a dedicated line of 3/8 StaSet attached near the masthead.

Set the pole in place and rock it forward to connect the StaSet. Rock it back and crank on the ratchet strap. Pull the guys and attach to the temporary shroud on each side, then tighten and cleat. Pay out the block and tackle and cleat at the bow. Tighten the main halyard and cleat. About 5 minutes have passed. Now haul on the block and tackle. About 30 seconds to raise. So, from start to finish might be 6 minutes. OK, maybe 10 but no more. About 5 minutes to break things down and store the gin pole in the truck.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top