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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello, Everyone. I own a 1981 O'day 22 and I was measuring for a Bimini today. You may know it's not easy fitting a Bimini on these boats. I found one that should work, but while measuring came across the channel the boom slides onto the mast. I've never taken the boom off this boat in the two years I've owned it, so I didn't notice there is a downhaul line that cleats off at the bottom. Evidently I was never raising the main to the top of the mast, because when I untie the line from the cleat, the main will go higher. With the main raised, the gooseneck is somewhere along the middle to upper portion of this channel.

Is it alright that the gooseneck doesn't rest at the bottom of the channel?


Naturally by gaining this additional couple of inches or so, I gain headroom in cockpit which helps for the Bimini.

Thanks!
 

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The downhaul can be is used to adjust the draft of your mainsail. So in practice you raise the sail to the top of the mast and use the downhaul to tighten or loosen the luff of the sail. If your mainsail is rigged with a cunningham, you would use it to adjust sail draft as conditions change while underway.

Yes the mid-position would seem an appropriate location of the boom to allow tightening and loosing of mainsail luff.
 

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You can position the boom anywhere along that track using the downhaul to keep it where you want it (that's important).

Raising/lowering the boom will affect your center of effort which would lead to more heeling force, but you may or may not care about that, or even notice. It's only a few inches.
 

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A sliding gooseneck is the means provided on smaller boats to adjust the luff tension of the main. Bigger boats will provide a winch for this purpose.

You need to raise the main with a loose gooseneck so the main goes to full hoist. Then pressure the gooseneck as needed to stretch the main, less in light air, very hard for heavy wind.

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While not ideal, one could always have the mainsail modified, so that the luff did not reach the bottom of that slide, presumably leaving room for the Bimini.
 
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