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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My main boom ends over the bridge deck, has bronze hardware on both sides. Even modest thumps give one a serious knot. So, anyone ever padded this stuff? With what? I'm concerned that a real whack will crack someone's skull.
 

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My main boom ends over the bridge deck, has bronze hardware on both sides.
They often do ;). Ours has the added advantages of being very low to the deck (not near enough room to get a bimini under, for example) and having a Spinlock cleat on the bottom that is just perfectly located to nail your skull if you're not careful transiting the companionway, or your back when transiting the side-decks and the boom's out.

I'm concerned that a real whack will crack someone's skull.
It might. Or it might do what it did to a sailor at the club where Abracadabra used to be: Break their neck and kill them instantly.

I'm sorry: There's just no substitute for watching out for the boom. We had a n00b on the boat yesterday. I told him: "First two safety rules: 1. That is the boom. Know where it is, and where it can possibly go, in relation to you, at all times. It can injure, permanently maim or kill you. 2. One hand for the boat, one hand for you."
 

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I know what you are talking about! I once let the boom get away from me and the main sheet hit my wife square across the bridge of her nose and broke her glasses. Lucky for us our boom is above head level. I don't have an answer for you thats takes care of every situation other than have the boom under control at all times.
 

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pads

1. That is the boom. Know where it is, and where it can possibly go, in relation to you, at all times. It can injure, permanently maim or kill you. 2. One hand for the boat, one hand for you."
Those are the same as my two rules for new guests, except I usually add a third: 'no paper down the marine head' :) -- the safety angle is that if they clogged the head I would be fairly likely to kill them :eek:

Regarding padding, 'Desirable and Undesirable Characteristics of the Offshore Yachts' for example, strongly recommends a pad on the end of the boom. I have yet to actually see a boat with the type of pad the recommend, however.
 

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We have a slight boom overlap...but if anyone is standing in the gap between bimini and dodger, they are definitely in harms way. Thankfully, no one has met Tyson underway - we named our boom...can deliver a knockout. Although, I had the distinct DISpleasure of having walked into his patch while cleaning the cockpit after the days sailing.

I dont know why they call it a Boom. It sounds like a "CLANG" followed by a string of expletives to me! Although naming it CLANG$*)*[email protected] doesn't roll off the tongue like Boom
 

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SailGunner
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We were racing a few years ago and during the beginning of the race I came up hard under the boom and cut my head open. My crew was an MD and I asked him to look at it. He said it was okay (keep in mind he is very competitive) so I padded my hat with paper towels and the bleeding stopped. After the race my wife finally made it to the lake and I had her look at it. We then immediately went to the hospital where I received 5 staples to close the wound. Oh, by the way, we won the race.
 

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Telstar 28
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A boom brake helps a lot...but if the boom is at head height, helmets are a good idea.
 

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Midwest Puddle Pirate
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Had a situation with my wife on my boat. Going downwind with shifting winds, and a wife that wouldn't listen to me when I told her to sit down. It finally came to me literally yelling in front of everyone aboard "TERESA, SIT THE F*** DOWN NOW!!" followed almost immediately with an accidental gybe. She looked away from her hateful glare about the same time as the boom whipped over her head. I had to live with that one for a while but at least no one got hurt.

Short of wearing a helmet, about all that can be done is to help your crew become aware of the dangers. Some crew just need a little more help seeing the light than others.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Had a similar situation with my ex (then current) wife. Asked her to tie a fender onto a cleat on the cabin top. She continued as I said, "that's ok, leave it". Finally I said sharply "sit down now!" just before we jibed. I'm sure she's still annoyed, though it saved her noggin fifteen years ago.
The current boom has put knots on my head, my crews head, my girl's head. Mostly while ducking (not quite enough) under the boom with the sail furled. The padeye is the worst threat, I'll have to do something.
 

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In light winds (a lot of mainsheet out) the boom on my boat will hit ya in the head while you're sitting down. If you're sitting on the coaming, it'll take your head clean off in any wind, probably right at the lower jaw or neck level. No matter how you try an explain it to guests, sometimes they just need to get bit before they listen. I always tell them to "watch the boom" on tacks and jibes, but you always get one that stairs at the boom as it hits em in the face. Good crew is hard to find.
 
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