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This is our second year in the same slip.
The slip if a typical finger pier on a floating dock.
We have three cleats on each side of the floating pier.

We have a new neighbor who ties his stern line to our cleat instead of his cleat. It is a better angle for him but one or both of us has to remove the other guys line to get to the other one.

What is your take?
Complain to the harbor master?
Just deal?
Tell him he has transgressed a sacred rule?
 

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Can you do the same?
I do that with bow lines. I take my neighbors cleat and he takes mine. Makes a better angle of pull.
 

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Well, it depends... is this the cleat nearest the main pier or at the end of the finger pier... if it is the one nearest the main pier, then the line is a tripping hazard... and you should tell him that... and ask him to refrain from doing that. If it is at the end of the finger pier, that's not a really usable excuse.

Ask him if he can leave that dockline on the cleat using the eye splice on the cleat. That way he wouldn't have to remove it or touch your line, and you're line would fit over it fairly easily.
 

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Learn how to dip your mooring line eye through his, or vice versa. That way either one of you can cast off without disturbing the other's lines.

I'll try to describe it to you; if you saw it you'd see how in an instant.

Imagine his mooring line eye on the cleat. It has an opening in the eye. Take your line's eye and pass it down through the inside of his eye, towards the deck of the pier. Then you just bring it up and back over his eye and onto the cleat. Now either of you can take a strain on the lines and still be able to cast off. Your eye might bind a bit coming free but nothing that a tug with the winch wouldn't free easily. And neither of you will have to so much as touch each other's lines. When you see ship's tied up in a line along a wharf this is how it's done, where their head lines and stern lines share a bollard or cleat.
 

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Sway—

You're assuming he leaves the excess line on the boat and doesn't use a cleat hitch on the cleat and doesn't feed the eyesplice through the base of the cleat. If he does either one of those things, dipping the eye doesn't work very well.
Learn how to dip your mooring line eye through his, or vice versa. That way either one of you can cast off without disturbing the other's lines.

I'll try to describe it to you; if you saw it you'd see how in an instant.

Imagine his mooring line eye on the cleat. It has an opening in the eye. Take your line's eye and pass it down through the inside of his eye, towards the deck of the pier. Then you just bring it up and back over his eye and onto the cleat. Now either of you can take a strain on the lines and still be able to cast off. Your eye might bind a bit coming free but nothing that a tug with the winch wouldn't free easily. And neither of you will have to so much as touch each other's lines. When you see ship's tied up in a line along a wharf this is how it's done, where their head lines and stern lines share a bollard or cleat.
 

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I had the same problem with a new boater at my marina a few years ago. I had a talk with him about this problem and told him that I was a "new boater" also and didn't know knots and allot of things. I told him if I have to remove your line l to untie mine, I can't be held responsible if I re-cleat your line and it does not hold! He started right away to tie off on his side of the finger.
 

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Bubb—

That's evil...letting their paranoia work on them....
 

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I'm not so sure this is a big deal and can be dealt with a little discussion. Where I am, I have a rafting partner and I have to release my 4 lines and sometimes 6 if it's winter, swing both boats 180 degrees tied together using the current and wind to my favour. Then put out fenders on his boat and secure his boat with 4 or 6 lines. Then release my boat and go. Then when he goes out he needs to do the same thing.

I realize what I go through isn't typical and we all know how to do it and agree to it but if all I had to do is untie and re-tie one line on someones boat I would be one happy camper.

So I would pick your third option; Just deal
 

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This is our second year in the same slip.
The slip if a typical finger pier on a floating dock.
We have three cleats on each side of the floating pier.

We have a new neighbor who ties his stern line to our cleat instead of his cleat. It is a better angle for him but one or both of us has to remove the other guys line to get to the other one.

What is your take?
Complain to the harbor master?
Just deal?
Tell him he has transgressed a sacred rule?
I would unbolt the cleat he's not using and mount it over on my side of the dock.
 

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Sway—

You're assuming he leaves the excess line on the boat and doesn't use a cleat hitch on the cleat and doesn't feed the eyesplice through the base of the cleat. If he does either one of those things, dipping the eye doesn't work very well.
Dog,
I'm also assuming that, despite the contrary evidence, everyone in the whole boating world isn't turning into a bunch of horse's backsides and actually considers, for one brief moment, walking across the dock and actually speaking to the person.

I offered my suggestion before someone decided to posit the notion that the US Coast Guard might want to be called in.

damn! I'm having trouble figuring out how I got the shp tied up all those years alongside Polish and Greek vessels where we shared no common language. It must be a yacht thing that precludes simple conversation.

And that's probably why you'll find me at the end of the dock talking to a fisherman instead of some white shoe'd polo wearing yacht boy with rubber snakes on his deck and a boat hook up his ass.

..and that's all I've got to say about that.
 

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Too funny!!!

To Sailaway

As the CBC would say, here in the great white north, you have the "letter of the day"
:laugher

To the OP, I would have to agree that a conversation with the other boat owner when you see them is a great idea! You might make a new friend.
 

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I think talking this over with the other boater is the first course of action.

I had a situation awhile back where I shared a double slip with this other boater, and he would tie up both his dinghies end to end, at the front of our slip between where our boat bows were. It wasn't really so bad because if I came in a little fast, I could bounce off the dinghy near the front of me...that never happened though. The part I didn't care for was he would always tie the dinghy close to my side, with its motor aimed at my side (and raised up out of the water). I was concerned that I might hit his motor coming in, and creating a nice gash on my hull. I told him I was thinking about moving his dinghy over to his side of the double slip, so we wouldn't have an accident. He told me he wouldn't have liked it if I had moved his property without his permission, so I told him that I didn't want to crush his new motor by accident, but if he didn't care I guess I shouldn't care either. The next day he hung his dinghy by the nose with a halyard over the side of his boat...engine removed.
 

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I must be doing it all wrong

Once set on the pier, I never un-tie the lines. When I leave my slip, I slip the lines on the boat and throw them on the pier. I won't touch the lines on the pier cleats until the next time I take the boat out of the water.
 

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I like the philosophy detailed in the move "A Beautiful Mind". Look out for yourself AND your neighbor. Make a deal that he gets to use your cleat but has to throw a beer your way every once in a while.

If he's using your cleat, how about using his (put it where you want it). Somehow, this is an opportunity to get you lines better set-up.

Anyway, my 2 cents.
 

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Yup... and my solution is a bit simpler but also makes the assumption that the OP can converse with the new dockmate. :)
Dog,
I'm also assuming that, despite the contrary evidence, everyone in the whole boating world isn't turning into a bunch of horse's backsides and actually considers, for one brief moment, walking across the dock and actually speaking to the person.

I offered my suggestion before someone decided to posit the notion that the US Coast Guard might want to be called in.

damn! I'm having trouble figuring out how I got the shp tied up all those years alongside Polish and Greek vessels where we shared no common language. It must be a yacht thing that precludes simple conversation.

And that's probably why you'll find me at the end of the dock talking to a fisherman instead of some white shoe'd polo wearing yacht boy with rubber snakes on his deck and a boat hook up his ass.

..and that's all I've got to say about that.
 

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Of course, you probably need to get the marina's permission to unbolt the cleat and to drill holes in their dock. :) And this assumes you can get to the nuts under the dock that the cleat is attached to, which may or may not be the case. Hopefully the cleats are through-bolted and not just lag bolted.

I would unbolt the cleat he's not using and mount it over on my side of the dock.
 

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Jiffy,

A friend of mine was a abalone diver, fisherman, etc. etc. on the Albion River in northern Calif. He came into his slip, and there sat a large aluminum dink. As he started to stop the boat he was getting swept down current. FULL THROTTLE forward he made it into the slip. The dink was crushed, and sunk...end of disagreement......i2f
 
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