SailNet Community banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
181 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It's been a popular discussion here recently. The focus is on cost of new boats and where one sits in the social hierarchy; from expensive new down to used beater boats.

I'd like to say that I'm happy with the state of things, but I think the discussion has the wrong focus. Sure, new boats are crazy expensive. Way crazy. That's what it costs to make them because nobody's working in a boat yard working at $3.50 an hour. There are political issues regarding distribution of wealth, but let's try to avoid that. Face it, such discussions on Sailnet never never solve anything and they're way off topic.

Here's a more interesting focus: When you're out on the water, it's absolute democracy at work. It does not matter if you have some beat up ugly boat from the 70's or if you have a new million dollar yacht. You share the same water, the same waves, suffer the same weather, and enjoy the same wind. The beauty and freedom of sailing is available to all. The rules of navigation are equitable.

Recent posts at the Sailing Anarchy blog show some appreciation of this attitude. Right next to an article about the zillion dollar yachts of St Barths is an article about Ronnie Simpson and his adventures crossing the Pacific in a $4000 boat. Sailing is sailing and it's good. It doesn't matter where you sit in the hierarchy, it's sailing.

JP Morgan has been quoted as saying "If you have to ask the price, you can't afford it". I read an interesting op-ed piece a while back that said his meaning has been misinterpreted. The claim was that his real meaning was that anyone asking the price of boating was missing the point. The real point was the experience of getting out on the water. If you don't have money you do it in a small boat, if you have money you get a big boat. The point isn't the money, it's the boat. Essentially, if you ask about the price then you don't understand the value of boating; it's priceless.

I guess I don't care whether or not that was the true meaning of Morgan's statement. It's the approach I prefer to take personally.

GTJ
 

·
Barquito
Joined
·
3,743 Posts
Here, try this one on for size:

Regarding socio-economic hierarchy: When we are out among the towering waves, we are all on a level playing field.
 

·
Sea Sprite 23 #110 (20)
Joined
·
3,217 Posts
yes, it is only in the marina that things get out of whack.. and personally, I rarely see those several hundred grand boats out of the marina...
 

·
Remember you're a womble
Joined
·
2,328 Posts
So I'm on my boat looking at him, he was on his boat looking at me. Decide amongst yourselves who had the better view :)

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
214 Posts
Social heirachy in the U.S??? :eek:

Pray tell, explain this concept in greater detail using your own words, so I can understand, pretty please...:confused:
Social hierarchy in the US equates STRICTLY to money. Class, grace, distinction, looks, courage, intelligence and strength don't enter into it at all. Before he went to the slammer, Madoff was the cream of the crop.

When at sea, whether professionally or on my own vessel, I am the Captain and that puts me at the top of the ladder. On the water, skill, intelligence, strength, and good judgement do matter.

That's one of the best things about a seagoing life IMHO.
 

·
Senior Smart Aleck
Joined
·
2,150 Posts
You have been living in Palm Beach too long, or not listening to the regular folks, enough.

Everyone is middle class in the U.S., doncha know? There ain't no upper class or lower class.

In all seriousness, I am grateful to live in a country where a boy can be born to a single mother in questionable circumstances, study hard, go to an Ivy league university, and become President of the U.S. and a millionaire. We know because our last two Democratic Presidents lived that upward mobility track.
 

·
Old soul
Joined
·
5,137 Posts
You have been living in Palm Beach too long, or not listening to the regular folks, enough.

Everyone is middle class in the U.S., doncha know? There ain't no upper class or lower class.

In all seriousness, I am grateful to live in a country where a boy can be born to a single mother in questionable circumstances, study hard, go to an Ivy league university, and become President of the U.S. and a millionaire. We know because our last two Democratic Presidents lived that upward mobility track.
I assume you're bored today James, or just trying to stir things up. I assume you know full well that your statement regarding everyone being middle class is factually wrong. As for the US's social mobility (the so-called American Dream), it is increasingly just that: a dream. There is a ton of good research which show the the US is now one of the most class-ridged societies of all developed nations.

BTW, my country of Canada is not much better, and getting worse faster than most :(.
 

·
Registered
Corsair 24
Joined
·
4,594 Posts
here here
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top