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1979 C&C 30 Mk I - 2QM15
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Discussion Starter #1
Another never-before-boat-owner question...

Bottom paint for a sailboat... I'm assuming that sailboats typically get ablative paint rather than hard paint.

For a Chesapeake Bay boat that's going to spend most of its time in the lower salinity - upper portions of the bay. What readily available ablative paints would fit in the following categories and how many coats should you ask for of each?

* Assume the boat will remain in the water between seasons

  • Expensive - (Will last 2+ seasons)
  • Midrange - (Should make it through 2 seasons)
  • Budget - (Good protection, but only through 1 season)
 

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Micron Extra or Micron 66 are ablative/co-polymer paints that are proven Chesapeake performers. 2-3 Coats. Should last at least 2 seasons. Around $200 / gal, which should be enough for 30-35' ft waterline length.

In my opinion, anything less...is not cost effective. You could paint one coat a different color to show areas that need touching up at spring commissioning. Give an extra coat at high wear areas, leading edges, waterline, etc.

Jason
 

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Ditto Jason...

Any money saved will be spent when you haul after 1 season instead of 2.

Also, whether the boat can stay in depends on the exact location; if it is too fresh it will freeze hard.

If I hauled every year, I suppose I would still use 66, just one coat.

Avoid build-up and you can avoid sanding most years.
 

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I agree, I used micron extra 2 coats with a third on the leading edge and I'm in the lower bay. Bottom stayed clean for for better than 3 seasons and probably could have lasted another.
 

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Bottom Paint

I'm sure these guys know more than I do.... But, I think it depends on your boat and what your doing with it. If your not racing and just day sailing and / or over nighting some times, I see no need to spend big bucks on paint. Why spend $200.00 per gallon just to do it again in a year or two ??
Go cheap, Get a good coat on and then Touch it up for a few years till the other color shows through, THEN start again with a different color.

If you have a high $$ boat and are after performance or looks then go with the Good stuff.

Just a different point of view.

Bee
 

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Practical Sailor just published some test results....

An Micron 66 finished on top, along with some other good paints. That was in FL.

Also, consider the cost of bad gas mileage with a foul bottom.
 

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1979 C&C 30 Mk I - 2QM15
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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
I just found out that bottom currently has a coat of Pettit Trinidad on it, which is is a Hard Anti-fouling paint... I'm looking at going to Micron 66 or Micron Extra Ablative...

The anti-fouling compatibility chart on the Interlux website states that the only thing I need to do is lightly sand before applying the Micron Ablative. But then in the fine print is seems to imply that I'll need to use Primocon YPA984 primer over the old paint.

AntiFouling Compatibility Chart

Does anyone have experience with switching from Hard to Ablative bottom paint? And did you need to prime over the old hard Hard anti-fouling first or did you just paint over with ablative?
 

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I just found out that bottom currently has a coat of Pettit Trinidad on it, which is is a Hard Anti-fouling paint... I'm looking at going to Micron 66 or Micron Extra Ablative...

The anti-fouling compatibility chart on the Interlux website states that the only thing I need to do is lightly sand before applying the Micron Ablative. But then in the fine print is seems to imply that I'll need to use Primocon YPA984 primer over the old paint.

AntiFouling Compatibility Chart

Does anyone have experience with switching from Hard to Ablative bottom paint? And did you need to prime over the old hard Hard anti-fouling first or did you just paint over with ablative?
I would think the compatability chart you linked would have the answer there. As I understand putting an ablative over hard paint is not a big deal, but you can't go the other way.

As far as performance in the Chesapeake is concerned, the previous owners of my last boat used Pettit Hydrocoat and I was very happy with how it worked and held up, so I continued using it and have two gallons at home for the new boat.

Its a multi-season ablative that has worked well for me and it costs about 1/2 of the brands I consistently see recommended here. Unless you are a racer using hard paint and burnishing your bottom, I can't see spending twice as much for bottom paint. I'm going over old paint so, I'll sand to create some "tooth", then two coats of Black Hydrocoat (3 in the high wear areas)over the exisiting blue and I won't paint again until blue is showing. I expect the paint to last at least 2 seasons based on what I saw on my previous boat.

Hydocoat is also water based, so I can get all "holier than thou" about green aspects and the easy clean up. lol
 

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I don't use my boat for racing or any competition - just relaxed cruising however I still spend the extra for the better paint and use Micron Extra. Last year I had my bottom cleaned towards the end of the season by a diver and the boat felt like a totally different animal. It accelerated much quicker and maintained a better speed at significantly lower RPMs than before. Therefore even though I don't race I just love the way the boat feels, responds and performs with a cleaner bottom and would rather spend the extra for a paint that keeps it that way longer. Just my .02 from a different perspective
 

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In recent years, I've had more problems with slimy growth than with barnacles. I've used Micron Extra with Biolux. Initially I thought the Biolux was marketing hype, but it seems to work. My boat was painted with hard black paint and red Micron over top of that with extra coats on leading edges and the rudder. I touch up when the black shows through and re-coat if a lot of black is showing. As MrBee points out, if you're racing, it's a whole new ball game.
 

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Micron Extra works for me
 

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I don't use my boat for racing or any competition - just relaxed cruising however I still spend the extra for the better paint and use Micron Extra. Last year I had my bottom cleaned towards the end of the season by a diver and the boat felt like a totally different animal. It accelerated much quicker and maintained a better speed at significantly lower RPMs than before. Therefore even though I don't race I just love the way the boat feels, responds and performs with a cleaner bottom and would rather spend the extra for a paint that keeps it that way longer. Just my .02 from a different perspective
Who says the more expensive paint really does that? Having read the Practical Sailor reviews, the paint companies websites and seen for myself how Hydrocoat works, I can find no compelling reason to pay nearly $100/gal more for a similar performing bottom paint. The light slime I get doesn't noticiably affect performance and if I thought it did, I have access to a dry scrubber and could clean most of the hull excluding the keel in about 15 minutes. The folks in my marina using more expensive paints seem to have a similar experience, except the racers still pay a diver a few times a season.

I didn't pay for a bottom cleaning or use the bottom scrubber last year and saw no noticeable decrease in performance other than from encrustation of the prop late in the season that I did hire a diver to address. This year, I'll probably be more proactive watching the prop and may have a bottom cleaning when/if the runnning gear needs attention.

Like you, I don't race my boat, but I do crew for a friend that does and I apply that experience to sailing my boat and like having the boat perform to its potential. This is just one expense where I don't see the added benefit for my situation.
 

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Colours make a difference for antifouling. The best protector is red (brown-red). The second one is blue. Try to use red colourwhichever brand you choose. Keep away from white.
 

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Color makes a difference? Fascinating! I'd like to read more about that. Would you point me to the relevant statistics or studies?

Thanks!

DaCAP

Colours make a difference for antifouling. The best protector is red (brown-red). The second one is blue. Try to use red colourwhichever brand you choose. Keep away from white.
 

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Tartan 37
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Color makes a difference? Fascinating! I'd like to read more about that. Would you point me to the relevant statistics or studies?

Thanks!

DaCAP
Yes please, I would like to see the same info, when you get a chance.
 

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1979 C&C 30 Mk I - 2QM15
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Discussion Starter #17
I stumbled across something about this when I was googling around about bottom paint. Apparently the red and reddish brown colors use copper oxide as pigment to create the red color and the additional copper content is thought to provide additional biocide anti-fouling properties. YMMV...
 

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Copper does pigment anti fouling paint. That's why lighter-colored paint has less of it. I can tell you from 15 years of close, personal observation however that there is no noticable difference in anti fouling performance from one color to another, given a particular product.
 

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October Moon B43
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Stick with either Micron or Pettit and stay away from Super Hawk. Tried it at the recommendation of the yard doing the bottom paint. He sold all brands but edged me towards the SH. I'll never go back to it. Slime and growth built up in no time, and that's using the boat every weekend. IMHO you get what you pay for when it comes to bottom paint.
 

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Backcreek,

As I have said before, I keep my boat on Back Creek. The growth is aggresive here. Get the good paint. It seems that the bridge is some kind of salinity demarkation. North, lower. South, higher.
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