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Discussion Starter #1
4 years ago I hulled out, sanded and applied Ameron ABC 3 bottom (ablative) paint:
ABC 3 anti fouling paint
Paint performed well, and is still performing well except at the bottom of the keel and a few other areas where I get rapid hard growth (1 inch thick in 1 month).

I am planning to use the Ameron ABC 3 again as I figure it works and it will adhere with no problems. But others say they like Petit Trinidad paint. This looks to be a good paint and I was considering it, yet I see where it is a hard modified epoxy. Seems I might have adhesion problems and I would think when the next haul out comes, more sanding of the old paint would be required.

Thoughts on the two paints?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Call Petit and ask them if their stuff will stick to Ameron ABC3. They'll tell you what they know.
Could call them. I have checked their web site and it looks as if your bottom paint is adhered, Trinidad can go over it and will stick- in theory anyway...

But other question is what is benefit of a hard paint such as Trinidad? Seems like it just makes more work when time to repaint, which looks to be in 4-5 years weather using ABC 3 or Trindad. So what is benefit of Trinidad?
 

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Trinidad is the best performing anti fouling paint available in the U.S. (IMHO) but if you are happy with your current paint, why switch?

BTW- it is likely that Trinidad is compatible with ABC 3.
 

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If your going to change paints why not take all the old stuff off, use the recommended factory primer for your new paint and then you won't have to worry about the adhesion issue.

Bottom paints are a lot like anchors. Everybody has his own theory. If your getting good service from your current paint stick with it.
 

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Don't take this from me, ask Pettit, but I am fairly sure you can't put a hard bottom paint straight over an ablative. You'd need to at least take the ablative off.

Which leaves you doing a lot of prep work, to switch from a paint that you know is working well.

Don't get me wrong, I like Trinidad too, but there are limits to the lengths I'd go to to install it....
 

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I was considering putting a hard bottom paint such as Trinidad when I redid the boat bottom(barrier coat) this past summer; however, I was told that hard bottom paints lose their effectiveness if out of the water for an extended period. I ended up going back to an ablative since the boat was to remain on the hard until next summer.
 

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I am fairly sure you can't put a hard bottom paint straight over an ablative. You'd need to at least take the ablative off.
This is a common misconception. Most copper-based paints are compatible with each other, regardless of whether they are hard or ablative paints. It's all in the preparation (as the case with most painting projects.) But removal of an ablative before putting on a hard paint is typically uneccessary.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Trinidad is the best performing anti fouling paint available in the U.S. (IMHO) but if you are happy with your current paint, why switch?

BTW- it is likely that Trinidad is compatible with ABC 3.
I probably will just stay with the ABC3. It is also about 1/2 the cost of Trinidad. But why do you like Trinidad? Seems the hard paints like Trinidad just make for more prep work to remove old paint when re-painting. Where as an ablative paint will wear away over its life and require less sanding when time to repaint.
 

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I probably will just stay with the ABC3. It is also about 1/2 the cost of Trinidad. But why do you like Trinidad? Seems the hard paints like Trinidad just make for more prep work to remove old paint when re-painting. Where as an ablative paint will wear away over its life and require less sanding when time to repaint.
I like Trinidad because there is no other paint that is better at doing what an anti fouling paint is supposed to do, which is retarding fouling growth. Nothing lasts longer or performs better, IMHO.
 

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The buildup of hard paints can be a problem, but it takes a long time. I had to have my bottom stripped due to buildup of hard paint and loss of adhesion, but that was after 28 years. I don't think most people are worried about an expense that comes every 3 decades. I certainly don't have to worry about it again.

Normally when you are applying Trinidad you just do a light sand to promote adhesion. You don't remove the old paint.
 

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Im a firm beleiver in not sanding bottom paint, but simply scraping all big items and lightly scuffing the old stuff to promote adhesion of the new stuff

this in cruiser type or while cruising scenario

I see too many people brushing their bottoms when traveling(and in marinas) and I have no idea why...all the good stuff is being brushed off...all you need is a scraper, a glove and a hookah or snorkel....
 

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Trinidad is the best performing anti fouling paint available in the U.S. (IMHO) but if you are happy with your current paint, why switch?

BTW- it is likely that Trinidad is compatible with ABC 3.
I always thought that bottom paint performance was dependent on where the boat is sailed - warm water, cold water, fresh water, salinity, etc. To say that Trinidad is the best performing paint is a broad statement. Oh my, this could get to be a very long thread...:D

I would ask around the people who sail where you are and ask them how the bottom paint is holding up.
In any case, since Ameron has performed so well, why change? Just apply more coats in the problem areas. My 2 cents.
 

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I see too many people brushing their bottoms when traveling(and in marinas) and I have no idea why...all the good stuff is being brushed off...all you need is a scraper, a glove and a hookah or snorkel....
What you are advocating can be considered a "worst management practice". Frequent, gentle cleaning with a soft pad or piece of carpet is the way to make your anti fouling paint perform at its best and for the longest time. A scraper should never be used as an all-over, every time cleaning tool.
 

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If a bottom paint is working for FOUR YEARS then buy a hundred gallons of it and sock 'em away for future use. Most boats, most paint? One year, two at the most. Three or four years of satisfactory bottom paint, and someone up there loves you.

Stick to it.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
What you are advocating can be considered a "worst management practice". Frequent, gentle cleaning with a soft pad or piece of carpet is the way to make your anti fouling paint perform at its best and for the longest time. A scraper should never be used as an all-over, every time cleaning tool.
I have been using a piece of carpet about every 4-6 months. I do know others in my harbor that use a plastic scraper every 4 months and they get 4 years out of their bottom paint- but I think they are using a hard paint not ablative.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
If a bottom paint is working for FOUR YEARS then buy a hundred gallons of it and sock 'em away for future use. Most boats, most paint? One year, two at the most. Three or four years of satisfactory bottom paint, and someone up there loves you.

Stick to it.
I think that is my plan. I would not be so concerned about the paint if it was not so difficult and expensive to haul out here in hawaii. I am looking at $1,200 for a hull out/in of a 34 foot boat. I could go to a location that would charge $500 but then pay $70 per day to be on the hard (free if I haul at my harbor). So it is critical to try to get as many years as possible from the bottom paint.
 

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well I completely disagree with you...but that is just my opinion...and experience from cruising...
No anti fouling paint manufacturer in the world is going to recommend that you clean their products with a scraper. Further, (as you undoubtedly know), a scraper doesn't really "clean" a hull. Sure, it'll take off the 3-dimensional stuff, but it doesn't do a good job on that last layer of slime growth. Plus, you are far more likely to damage the coating by pushing a hard and/or sharp object across it than by wiping it down with a white pad or piece of carpet.

If you find yourself needing to scrape the hull every time you clean it (as opposed to using a scraper to remove the occasional spotty hard growth during a cleaning event), you either need to clean more frequently or repaint. This is true regardless of where you do your sailing. Anti fouling paint is anti fouling paint, whether you are using it at the equator or in high latitudes. The basics of maintaining it properly do not change.
 

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I think we agree more than we disagree...

scraping a hull is an art...and yes I have seen many people scrape their hulls badly
Well, I'm not sure how much we agree on any of this but I will tell you that in the hull cleaning industry (at least in California), using a scraper to clean an entire hull is a last resort reserved for the most badly fouled bottoms. But we clean often enough here that scrapers typically do not need to be used in that fashion. I'd be out of business in a hurry if my customers saw me going after their expensive bottoms with a scraper.
 
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