SailNet Community banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, I have a new to me Heritage W.I. Ketch. Previous owner tells me the bottom was repainted in Key West with Inter protect 2000e. He said that the yard waited for the first coat to dry and it was supposed to be repainted when the base coat was tacky and the paint washed off on the way back up to the east coast.
Is this possible?
What type of bottom paint can be painted over it?
Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25,128 Posts
Interprotect 2000 is not an anti-foulant paint. It's an epoxy barrier coat, applied to a bare hull to mitigate water osmosis. They usually make a good primer coat, as well. You are supposed to apply your first coat of anti-foulant while the barrier coat is still tacky. It seems pretty severe, however, that it would all just "wash" off in one passage. There is either some fibbing going on, or a very bad bottom paint job. Or both.

Bottom painting can be a real hassle and get very expensive, if not done correctly. I'm a huge believer that you do it right the first time, know what's on the hull and maintain it properly. Otherwise, you're fighting with chipping, excessive wear, recoating more often, etc. In your case, I would be tempted to take all the anti-foulant down to the barrier. If the barrier shows any sign of adhesion issues (and it can if not applied properly), I would remove it too. Start over. You'll be happy you did, if there is reason to believe the foundation of your bottom paint is bad.

You can always contact Interlux directly. They get these calls all the time.
 

·
Registered
Contest 36s
Joined
·
7,778 Posts
What do members do to repaint.... especially after multiple seasons with 2 plus coats applied each year?

I see what seems like little to no effort to sand / remove the pain before repainting. And this results in build up of a thick layer which can scale off in patches and so forth. Essentially what seems to be taking place... I am not watching obviously... is the bottom is power washed and then over painted and the boat is splashed.

I hear advice about applying 2 coats of paint... non ablative... in my case. I am not sure I understand the wisdom of that... or how the paint below the surface would assist in anti fouling. YES if the paint softens and the antifouling agents can migrate to the surface. If not I don't get it? And how long before all those agents would be "used up? And how can one tell? Is that even possible?

I have had Shiva for 33 years and done a lot of bottom paint jobs, myself and done by the yard. Crappy yards will do the work when you are not around to observe and will simply power wash and paint... Better yards will wet sand wash and paint. Almost every paint companies (varnish as well) have specs for surface prep and often includes sanding.

If you haul out every year... perhaps one coat is better than 2? or better than 2 coats for 2 seasons?

Regardless, I find that where I moor... no bottom paint seems too effective... and one has to dive the bottom and scrub the bottom.... So if you are doing THAT regularly... does 2 coats annually do better than one? I now have a diver about one a month... I am using Trinidad.

Bottom paint is WAY too expensive and not healthy for you or the environment. Something will change. It has to.

What is your experience and recommendations?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,623 Posts
When we were in New England and hauling the boat every winter, I would just apply a single coat of very thinned out cheapest ablative paint I could find that year. This lasted for the season with no barnacles, but a lot of scum and moderate soft growth that pressure-washed right off (along with most of any remaining paint) at haul out. Repeat the following spring.

Now, we apply 3 coats of quality ablative because we are in warm waters and only haul every 2-3yrs. At the end of this time, there is little paint remaining on the boat, and I just tell the pressure-washer operator to have a real go at it when hauling out. This takes off almost all the paint, and some light sanding gets the barnacle foots off and keys it up enough for new paint. The last few months before I haul out, I will also be aggressive when cleaning the bottom, and this removes paint.

In certain areas, labor rates are so low that we will hire people to wet-sand the bottom, and this will definitely remove all the paint.

The PO of our boat used hard paint for many years, and we took off 400lbs of it when we had it soda blasted. I will never go back to hard paint.

Mark
 

·
Registered
Contest 36s
Joined
·
7,778 Posts
colemj;2051342034 The PO of our boat used hard paint for many years said:
I did the soda blasting back in 09 and have been only doing one coat. Bottom has very few barnacles... but a fair amount of growth if not removed by the diver. I don't do the bottom work for multiple reasons... I have yet to learn how the new yard does them... I'll find out. I suppose I could hire someone to wet sand if they don't but i am sure they will do it for $$. They don't like to thin the paint I found.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25,128 Posts
When I bought this boat over 8 years ago, I had the bottom fully stripped. Applied a couple of coats of barrier and a couple of coats of hybrid paint (hard-ablative). Pettti Vivid.

Every year since, I have her lightly sanded and one top coat applied. Zero build up, zero chipping, etc. Looks new every spring.

Slime builds, but is easily removed by hand. This past season, I never cleaned the hull once all year (unusual, but it got away from me and the local diver stopped working weekends). Nothing but slime that power washed off after 7 full months in the water.

I know there are multi year programs that work too, but this works for me.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top