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Discussion Starter #1
Pressure washing the bottom in-water. Any info on an wantxextension to do this?
 

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Hope you have hard bottom paint, because if you have ablative, ANY in water cleaning is fineable up to $10K. Seem to recall a potential incarceration penalty too.....but could have a foggy brain on the latter.........

Might be simpler to make an appt here in Edmonds for an hour, have the PW the boat, change zincs etc and relaunch and hr later........besides, its legal!

Otherwise, I would suggest a diver with a soft cloth/rag unless you have some really hard shell fish, ie barnacles/mussels etc.

marty
 

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Edmonds does restrict more than DOE, not that it stops us from cleaning the bottoms with in the marina. POE does not allow ANY bottom cleaning in the marina, hard or ablative.

The state on the other hand, does as you and i stated, allow it for hard paints. That is why I was hoping you have a hard paint. If not......that could get fun.......Even if you have hard paint, I would still talk to a diver with a soft cloth. That seems to work best.

Marty
 

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Several years ago someone in the marina tried using a power washer on the waterline and I immediately saw the ablative paint start washing away. Definitely not recommended.
 

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Pressure washing the bottom in-water. Any info on an wantxextension to do this?
You will likely ruin your anti fouling paint if you attempt this, whether you have hard or ablative paint. Pressure washers should never be used to clean painted surfaces underwater. The reason is that in order to overcome the ambient pressure of the water surrounding the hull, you will have to have the wand tip extremely close to the surface being cleaned. At the distance we are talking about, the pressure of the water being emmitted from the wand is very high and uncontrollable. You will blast the paint off your hull.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
What distance did you have in mind? I was thinking that a depth of up to three feet pressure was about 16 psi.
 

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What distance did you have in mind? I was thinking that a depth of up to three feet pressure was about 16 psi.
I think you will find the pressure washer is pretty much ineffective at any safe distance underwater. Again, you will have to get the wand tip right up on the surface of the hull before it will remove fouling growth. A distance so close that you will be unable to keep from removing paint as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Right. Assuming the pressure washer is operated with a tip to give 800 to 1200 PSI it appears that a washer submerged with 16 psi of sea back pressure isn't significantly different than operating a washer out of water with no back pressure. For house paint you pick a the nozzle tip to avoid removing paint from too high a pressure. Seems like that would be the same underwater with a hard paint.
 

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What distance did you have in mind? I was thinking that a depth of up to three feet pressure was about 16 psi.
If this worked the pros would use it, don't you think? There are few things more tiring than hand cleaning a hull in scuba gear.

Also, at 3 feet depth the added pressure is only 1.3 psig, so I suppose you're getting 16 from that plus the atmosphere? I think it's the medium that's the issue (spraying in water vs air) that's the problem, not the absolute pressure.
 
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Right. Assuming the pressure washer is operated with a tip to give 800 to 1200 PSI it appears that a washer submerged with 16 psi of sea back pressure isn't significantly different than operating a washer out of water with no back pressure. For house paint you pick a the nozzle tip to avoid removing paint from too high a pressure. Seems like that would be the same underwater with a hard paint.
Hey, rationalize all you want, but what I'm telling you is based on over 19 years of professional hull cleaning experience. But it's your boat and your dime. Let us know how it works out for you if you go forward with this.
 

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Some time ago I read about bottom cleaning using a pressure cleaner although it was used on commercial vessels. The pressure cleaning device was essentially a double ended wand with matching tips on each end to account for Newton's action/reaction law and was only effective on soft growth. Hard growth though, barnacles and such, were removed with a commercial version of a device known as a "Wave Blade", basically a vibrating bottom scraper. With these devices a crew of two made reasonably short work of cleaning the bottom of a sizable ship. Again, as others have mentioned, I question the efficacy of this approach with ablative paint but with hard paint, it might be an alternative for owner maintenance. For my part, unless we're on a cruise and the yacht needs a quick once-over in an anchorage, I prefer relying on a knowledgeable diver.

FWIW...
 

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FYI
Wash. Dept of Ecology allows in water bottom cleaning for "hard" bottom paints. The details on what it considers to be "hard" is on thier website: Hull Cleaning and Boat Washing | Clean Green Boating | Washington State Department of Ecology
Some marinas, maybe Edmonds, apply restrictions beyond what DoE requires.
That page doesn't really define what "soft" is beyond what the manufacturers say. Anything sold as ablative counts as soft as far as the state is concerned.

There are certainly lots of devices that one can find for cleaning the bottom from the dock. Most look like a long pole with a dogleg halfway down and some sort of sponge at the end.

I have Micron 66, so no in water cleaning for me. I'd be curious to know what hard paints people are getting 2-3 year service out of in Puget Sound.
 

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I'm recalling seeing at the westlake WM a pole with a hose attachment and a sponge for cleaning bottoms. But could be wrong on the hose attachment part.

From a pole standpoing, sprinkler pipe with a long electric pipe sweep works in the 1 1/4" pipe works. I use a extendable painters pole with a foldable extension on the end, so I can angle the brush end. I use a fine scrubby in reality.......

Many ways of getting to the bottom from the dock.

Marty
 

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That page doesn't really define what "soft" is beyond what the manufacturers say. Anything sold as ablative counts as soft as far as the state is concerned.

There are certainly lots of devices that one can find for cleaning the bottom from the dock. Most look like a long pole with a dogleg halfway down and some sort of sponge at the end.

I have Micron 66, so no in water cleaning for me. I'd be curious to know what hard paints people are getting 2-3 year service out of in Puget Sound.
Alex--

We have been using Pettit Trinadad SR for the past 12 years on the southwest coast of Florida where I would expect bottom fouling would be much faster/worse than what you might experience in the colder waters of the northwest and we have been very happy with the product. We haul the boat at 3 year intervals as that seems long enough to go between personally inspecting the bottom ashore but, given the condition of the paint at such times, we could easily have gone another year or two. (Note that I have a diver that cleans the bottom every six weeks between October and April and at 3-4 week intervals between May and September. (He generally reports very little growth and that mostly on the running gear or bottom of the keel where the yacht sometimes sticks in the mud at low water Spring tides)

FWIW...
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thanks for all the info. This is kind of a job of knocking off the big stuff. We'll need a diver later on. Separately it was suggested that I try a wand with a gutter cleaning attachment with a nozzle protector. Low cost and worth a try. Thanks
 

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Okay, embarrasing story time---
I was once employed as a roller coaster mechinc in several amusement parks. At one of them we had to remove excess grease from the track, loops and all. It was considered too large of a task to perform by hand, so we came up with an idea to use a climber with a pressure washer. Being one of the more experienced climbers, I enthusiastically started at the top of a loop hanging from a rope with the pressure washer, lowering myself down as I cleaned. Worked like a charm until I had so much rope that every time I pulled the trigger, the jet would push me backwards and around in circles. That was almost 15 years ago, and the story is still around haunting me. I can only imagine the fun your marina mates will have telling the story of how you went shooting out from under your boat for years to come.
 

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I'd be curious to know what hard paints people are getting 2-3 year service out of in Puget Sound.
I got 3 years of good use of Trinidad SR on my Catalina 30 in Edmonds.
 
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