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Please chime in...

I painted the bottom (2 coats of Trinidad) in Oct 2018 and launched to sit in water winter storage... the least expensive at the time.... and I could begin getting the boat together as it had stayed on the hard as I had surgery in Spring 18.

I had I diver scrub the bottom 2 or 3 times summer of 2019. Not terrible fouling nor barnacle growth. Diver worked out well.

Now thinking about getting going for summer 2020. Have to do a 75 mile sail to summer mooring and would like to do on a cleanish bottom if I can... and I would like to do in April as soon as weather is permitting.

Local diver is way too expensive because of some CT law about water temps (requires 2 divers or something)

It's been less than 18 months and I don't want to re paint... So the cleaning options are:

a) short haul and power wash - around $600 (near winter store or summer mooring)

b) wait for warmer water and get a diver... which should less than $200

c) scrub with scotchbrite on a pole from dockside and leave the zinc to a mid season diver scrub ($30 for scotchbrite pads)

I am thinking of haul-block-paint etc and back in water for winter storage next fall (this will be a re paint after 2 yrs)

Or perhaps I should do all of 2020 with the old paint... haul and paint in Spring 2020 doesn't much matter how foul the bottom becomes in water in winter if repainted in Spring)
 

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Wouldn’t worry about paint as much as I would about zincs. Assume wet storage means a marina. Even if you have galvanic isolators that won’t help much with stray current in the water.
We’re in the Caribbean and rarely in yards. Still, given the water is warm it’s easy to look at your own zincs and bottom. There’s no doubt in my mind there’s quicker growth and faster cathode use in marinas. Another reason to avoid them.
If you have a bow thruster it likely has AL cathodes. They just melt in a marina. So it’s likely you will need a diver for zincs as per your opening post timeframe. In Rhode Island would find someone with a dry suit and tanks. Leave the marina a find a very quite spot. Anchor and do both zincs and bottom. Pay cash.
Our snubbers rub away the paint at the breakwater, just a plastic scraper and a fought terry cloth suffices to keep it clean. In Rhode Island got grass growing on the bootstripe. PIA to clean off. Surprisingly grew on the side between the dock and boat. Not the exposed side. Guess that side stayed moist.
Been thinking about buying a hookah set up for just this reason. The electric ones are pretty small and would fit under our quarterberth.
 

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S/V Caper Nonsuch 36
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use a Go Pro to inspect the bottom and then decide if you can sail as is until the water warms a bit. 75 miles isn't that far, 1 day with a a clean bottom, 2 with a fouled bottom.
 

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If you are in a marina, have a look around for any race boats. Most of them will likely have long handled bottom scrubbers that will allow you to get most of the bottom, rudder and most of the keel scrubbed from the dock. I'm sure you will find someone that will loan you their brush in exchange for beer or rum if not free. Failing that you could make your own out of abs pipe and a piece of artificial turf or some other gently abrasive material. You just need a length or 2 of pipe, a 45° elbow, a tee and 2 end caps. Glue it all together and the air trapped in the pipe makes the brush buoyant which holds it up against the hull.

I don't know what it's like where your boat is, but around here we don't get much more than slime in the winter. Unless your bottom paint is completely spent you shouldn't have much hard stuff.

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It’s not the bottom for us....it’s the prop and shaft.
I’d risk taking her back to Northport and have the diver go down there in the spring
You should get your two years at least from high quality Trinidad
 

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How many more 75 miles sails do you expect to have in you? I'd spend the money and have it be as pleasurable as possible. Hard growth on the prop would be my biggest concern, but I think I'd like to have a clean bottom for a trip like that. Enjoy it!!
 

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Gonna do a Gp Pro, clean at dockside as best I can... and prop is usually not too bad... but if it is I will have to get a diver.
Good choice
 

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Personally, I'd jump in with a dry suit and be done before you figured out the Go Pro rig. But yeah, you need to be careful with cold water and the gasp reflex.
 

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I'm in Stamford CT, in the water at a marina. I went and bought a semi dry suit and a 60 foot extension second stage hose for scuba tank. I was wondering about the water temp and when I can hop in. I think it's dry suit weather right now.
jon
 

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Been thinking about buying a hookah set up for just this reason. The electric ones are pretty small and would fit under our quarterberth.
We bought a Sea Breathe deck snorkel about 8 years ago and it was a great investment. Works on 12 vdc and when the sun is out, our solar panels cover the draw. Never had any problems with it and it has saved us literally thousands of dollars, even considering how much cheaper divers are in the Caribbean.
 

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We bought a Sea Breathe deck snorkel about 8 years ago and it was a great investment. Works on 12 vdc and when the sun is out, our solar panels cover the draw. Never had any problems with it and it has saved us literally thousands of dollars, even considering how much cheaper divers are in the Caribbean.
Seabreathe is on my wishlist too! I am used to doing prop maintenance, since and bottom cleaning with a mask and snorkel, but it is much harder to do with the bigger boat. I cant hold my breath long enough to install the zinc in one go!

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What you need to is to make yourself a Halpern MkII bottom scrubber. What's that you say? Here it is....
Halpern- Mk II bottom Scrubber R-2_001 by jeff_halp, on Flickr

The idea is that the foam in the PVC pipe floats the pipe up against the hull. The hard part is finding two tress that are next to each other to make the bend in the conduit. The bends are made in small sections rather than all at once and need to be roughly half of the beam of the boat and are more than 90 degrees when done.

The MK III model had a sleeve in the end of the of the conduit and another 5 foot length that bolted onto the sleeve for doing the keel and rudder. Another feature of the Mk III is that it had a 2x4 block inside the PVC pipe that allowed the end of the conduit to terminate inside of the PVC pipe rather than stick out. That made it easier to do the keel and rudder. It also had a heavy shock cord leash that hooked to the lifeline with a plastic snap hook. You could probably build the whole thing for $15-20.00 and get a pretty clean bottom with it.

The only down side is that it does not change zincs, but I am working on a MK IV for that.

Jeff
 
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