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How astonishing! Never saw that coming. Glad we waited until after the investigation. :D
Nobody denies that sailing into the hurricane was the primary root cause. However, this finding is significant, and is the reason why the investigation had to be undertaken:

The NTSB also pointed out in its report that the company responsible for the ship, HMS Bounty Organization, LLC, "did nothing to dissuade the captain from sailing into known severe weather conditions."

The board said that oversight contributed to the ship's sinking.
 

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When I first saw the video wherein Capt Walbridge said, with a Mona Lisa smile, "we chase hurricanes", I could have predicted the "authorities" would conclude pretty much as the NTSB did.

Being caught out in a storm is one thing. Leaving port to head towards one is "something else".

Too bad they lost the two lives. And many many thanks to the Coast Guard that they didn't lose the rest.
 

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Mechsmith
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Sorry, I would blame a lot of it on the builder.

Ships and boats are supposed to utilize wind and water. Short of hitting shallow water or failing to depower the sails there is a limit to what manoevering a ship can do.

The ship obviously was designed for lakes and rivers regardless of what the builder claimed. Since it was not a racing vessel there is no good reason (except for price points) that a boat could not lie a hull in a hurricane.

If there was not a lot of inadequate design in the world today I'd have to have found another way to support my hobbies.
 

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Sorry, I would blame a lot of it on the builder.

Ships and boats are supposed to utilize wind and water. Short of hitting shallow water or failing to depower the sails there is a limit to what manoevering a ship can do.

The ship obviously was designed for lakes and rivers regardless of what the builder claimed. Since it was not a racing vessel there is no good reason (except for price points) that a boat could not lie a hull in a hurricane.

If there was not a lot of inadequate design in the world today I'd have to have found another way to support my hobbies.
Wow, you're going to blame a builder who built a vessel to make a movie and expected her to burn in the last scene of the movie?
That's totally unfathomable to me. She outlived her expected lifespan by 52 years!
 

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This is why we pay so much for government. To come to conclusions that are obvious. But at least they came to the obvious solution. Image if they spent all that time and money and determined it had nothing to do with sailing into a hurricane.
 

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This is why we pay so much for government. To come to conclusions that are obvious. But at least they came to the obvious solution. Image if they spent all that time and money and determined it had nothing to do with sailing into a hurricane.
Well, if you go back to the thread were the issue was discussed you are going to see that to come to that general consensus it took a long time here too.

Regards

Paulo
 

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Mechsmith
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If it was a movie prop why was it off shore? Was the captain or company informed that it was just a movie prop and never was intended to be sailed.

Yes a lot of poor judgement was shown but basically somebody built and sold an un-seaworthy boat.

We certainly can't blame the holding companies. OOP's Heading for PWRG:confused:
 

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Kynntana (Freedom 38)
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What I never realized until seeing that map on pg 6 of the report is how much the captain turned the ship to move directly toward the hurricane and between the lee shore. Given the amount of weather information that would have been available, it seems unlikely he didn't know how massive that storm was before making that decision.
 

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If it was a movie prop why was it off shore? Was the captain or company informed that it was just a movie prop and never was intended to be sailed.

Yes a lot of poor judgement was shown but basically somebody built and sold an un-seaworthy boat.

We certainly can't blame the holding companies. OOP's Heading for PWRG:confused:
There has possibly been more written about this vessel than any other vessel in history. Why don't you do a little reading about her history and perhaps you will find the answers to these rather simple questions for yourself. I'm afraid I can't be more help without being rude.
 
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Given the amount of weather information that would have been available, it seems unlikely he didn't know how massive that storm was before making that decision.
Yeah. He turned deliberately as he said in the tv interview to chase hurricanes and get the wind behind him. He had no intention, by the looks, of staying to the east of it. If he had he would have had head winds and be in the dangerous quadrant.

Btw there was a post saying he should have layed ahull (a concept i hate, but lets say hove to)... He couldnt do that as the hurricane would have gone right over his head. But punching down with all speed destroyed his boat.

Once he left harbour he was committed.

When looked at it like that his decision making was more than just stupid or negligent....
 

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Sorry, I would blame a lot of it on the builder.

.....

The ship obviously was designed for lakes and rivers regardless of what the builder claimed. Since it was not a racing vessel there is no good reason (except for price points) that a boat could not lie a hull in a hurricane.

....
No, the ship was not designed for lakes and rivers but it was basically a XIX century design, made of wood, that has not the same seaworthiness of a modern design of the same size, made of steel.

I don't get what you mean racing boats but in fact the techniques to ride these historical ships in bad weather are not the same than on modern sailboats with modern rigs and much less windage. A modern sailboat can heel to 90º and recover. One of these has a much smaller AVS and in bad weather on of the main concerns is diminish roll.

Even if it was a modern sailing ship of the same size it would be very risky to take it to an hurricane even if the chances of survival would be bigger.

regards

Paulo
 

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In its final hours, the Bounty took on about three metres of sea water in a 3½-day voyage the NTSB says "should never have been attempted."
Before setting sail in October 2012 the Bounty had undergone maintenance and repairs, most of which were performed by an inexperienced crew with little understanding of the specialized work, according to the NTSB report.
"One of their tasks was to caulk and reseam a wooden hull, which had known areas of rot, with compounds supplied by the captain, including a silicone sealant marketed for household use," said an NTSB news release
It was reckless to leave the harbor under any conditions, it was taking on too much water sitting at the dock. It was certified as a "dockside attraction" and was no more sea worthy than the merry-go-round at the other end.
Bathroom caulk for goodness sakes.
 

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I crewed on the "californian" a very very well maintained tall ship that was used in the movie AMISTAD bout 110 feet long or so.

this boat was impeccably maintained and had a very knowleadgeable captain and crew...they cruised the pacific and atlantic routes frequently.

so its not that all tall ships or replicas are sitting dock museums its again captain and crew responsabilty to maintain, upkeep modify and know the boats limitations.

for example If I as crew knowingly made a blind eye to using bathroom caulk on rotten wood(not seems) I would of simply quit my job before leaving that day.

simple

blame can be thrown all ways here..the point was in the end the captain made a wrong decision and the crew didnt either.

notice the article made mention of non experienced crew many times..?

this is key..as a captain on an old wooden replica can be quite endearing...bravado is common.

peace
 
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