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SV Skalliwag #141
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Discussion Starter #1
I have a line at the dock that runs the full length of the boat that I use as a double spring line with a bowline on a bight amidships. The knot will tighten around the cleat making it a bear to loosen so i can remove from the cleat. Is that the best knot choice for the application?
 

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A bowline on a bight should have two loops in the middle of the line. Does yours?

Anyway, why not tie a normal cleat hitch in the middle and continue on with the long bitter end?

If I were doing this, I would likely prefer the bight of the line be on a dock cleat near amidships and run the line aft and forward on the boat. This way, the bight will always be tied in the correct place, as I leave my lines on the dock. However, ideally, lines left on the dock have spliced loops for the boat cleats that just drop over. I suppose a long line could have loops at each end, but that a bit too custom and less adjustable.
 

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Catamarans are the best
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yup, alpine butterfly is what I would suggest too if you want a loop in the middle. here is what I think is an even easier way to tie it, if it can get any easier.. and simple to teach someone else. Method 2 : Single-Loop Knots
 

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I put a turn or 2 around the amidships cleat.
 

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Agreed...Keep it simple stupid... thats the best approach...
 

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SV Skalliwag #141
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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks all. I will switch to the alpine hitch. I use the pre made hitch to quickly slide over a mid ship cleat as I enter my slip single handed.
 

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A butterfly knot is more easily made than in the two examples given, simply twist the head of a bight twice and pass it through the resulting opening. Where you place the twist determines the size of the eye.
By the way, doing the same with two bitter ends instead of a bight produces a carrick bend.
 

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Thanks all. I will switch to the alpine hitch. I use the pre made hitch to quickly slide over a mid ship cleat as I enter my slip single handed.
That makes more sense, as to why you want a loop. I'm curious, however. Do you keep both ends of your long line tied to the slip, or do you remove one end, so you can drop the loop earlier on approach. I would think the later, as tying each end would allow very little room for error.

Another idea is to have a dedicated landing spring line. It doesn't even need to be a part of your final tie down. Best if it's even a different color from the rest, in the event you ask someone on the dock to hand it to you.
 

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I still dont see why you want a knot in the middle at all. Unless you are only using the one dock, the position of the dock cleats/bollards etc will be different each time and you will never be exactly in between then. The knots look too long to adjust but just turned around the cleat its quickly and infinitely adjustable.
 

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Personally, I always use a bow and stern line and however many springs as required by the vessels size and the tide, also I always keep the lines on the boat, the boat is made fast to the dock, not the other way around.
 

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SV Skalliwag #141
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Discussion Starter #14
I dock the boat in a slip, not a T dock so the 40 ft double spring line which is tied off at the dock and a piling at the entrance to the slip is suspended in the air when not in use. I slide the boat into the slip, stop at about the right spot and go amidships to slip the double spring onto the midship cleat. If I am not in the exact right spot I use the spring to pull the boat slightly so I can slip the loop onto the cleat. Once done I shutdown the engine and leisurely tie off the remaining dock lines.
 

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I dock the boat in a slip, not a T dock so the 40 ft double spring line which is tied off at the dock and a piling at the entrance to the slip is suspended in the air when not in use. I slide the boat into the slip, stop at about the right spot and go amidships to slip the double spring onto the midship cleat. If I am not in the exact right spot I use the spring to pull the boat slightly so I can slip the loop onto the cleat. Once done I shutdown the engine and leisurely tie off the remaining dock lines.

Ahhhhhhh. Right. OK you explained it a bit better :)

Maybe an alpine loop with a bit of hose as chafe guard where it goes around the cleat.

But over time any knot will tighten up and be difficult to remove.
 

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Catamarans are the best
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A butterfly knot is more easily made than in the two examples given, simply twist the head of a bight twice and pass it through the resulting opening. Where you place the twist determines the size of the eye.
By the way, doing the same with two bitter ends instead of a bight produces a carrick bend.
Method #1 for an example (in the link from my previous post): Single-Loop Knots
 
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