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It’s more often the skipper that is to blame for a capsize than the boat. One needs to learn proper heavy weather sailing skills and try to stick to seasonal weather patterns that are least likely to produce those kinds of conditions.

If I may say, the decision making above seems built on fear. With more experience, you’ll become more confident.

Steel boats may take a bigger punch, but you’d be surprised how much force it takes to puncture fiberglass. Neither are bullet proof. Steel also corrodes, both galvanic and oxidation. They need to be seriously inspected and maintained routinely. You’ll want to be able to inspect every inch inside and out, whereas fiberglass will likely outlive you.

Yes, BS designs are controversial. I can’t speak to form stability of that design, but no boat will be without some uncomfortable motion. What one finds uncomfortable even varies person to person. As one builds experience, one usually finds their tolerance expands, which I think is a factor of their nerves subsiding.

Good luck.
 

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I can’t say what the self righting characteristics are of a BS design. I think I’d also want to know the boats angle of vanishing stability. IOW, the angle at which it will no longer stay upright. These are home made boats and I’m not sure it‘s even known from build to build.

A capsize will tear off the mast, most likely. Then the wreckage hanging off the side will need to be cut free before it beats the hull to death, stoves in port lights, etc. Personally, I don’t think whether it will come back upright is remotely as significant as avoiding it in the first place.
 
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