SailNet Community banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
830 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I am in proceeds of gathering info and parts to install an anchor/bow roller for my Watkins 27. It more than likely comes in at 8000 gross, 3'-8"draftt and #@3500 ballast. I'd like to install a bow/anchor bridle *edit* as a snubber, to attach to a proposed bow hook. My problem is how to atttach the briidle to the 1/2" rode? Chain would be NP, as there's hooks aplenty forthat; but I don't want to switch to all chain..

While I.could probably come up with a. knot of some type, I'd sooner have a bit of. .hardware to simply clip on to.. Perhaps something similar to a "figure 8" ascender? It would. need to be removabble/moveable to accomodate diffferent scope ; but have a feature to lock it down .

Any and all input welcome, thanks,
Paul
 

·
I don't discuss my member
Joined
·
2,557 Posts
An ascender would work but it may not be strong enough.

A prussik knot would/should work and is easy to move, set up, and clip to.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
778 Posts
Prussik knot is the usual go-to for rode-to-bridle connections. Look in multihull forums where rode-to-bridle tying is discussed with some frequency
 

·
██▓▓▒▒░&
Joined
·
13,645 Posts
Paul-
Check out Rope Hitches | How to Tie Rope Hitches | Animated Rope Hitches

There are various hitch knots that you can use to tie onto a standing line (i.e. your anchor rode) that are easy to tie on, and throw off, and will all grab that line tightly so you can pull on it. All have different pros and cons, but what you want to do can be done with just a hitch. Which one depends on how complicated, whether it has to hold while slack or just tense, etc.

Same thing applies to genoa sheets, if you've ever wrapped a winch real damn tight and needed to pull in the sheet in order to get some slack and get the winch free...you throw a hitch over the sheet and haul in some slack.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
830 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Jon;

Bow plate has rail around to match toe rail. Chocks are cast into this rail, as is the tack for jib. Centered not far astern is the 8" cleat. *IF* I need/want to cleat off something else; like my 85% jib pendant (?), there's not much purchase left on the cleat.. Anything else is a goner! The gen'l layout of the exist. hardware is a bit cramped
I'd like to be able to clip bridle off tothe bow to keep the tension off the roller assb'y sticking out fromthe bow plate. I plan to add a few more cleats and possibly a mooring bit. Still working out details and placement.


"snubber" was simply to clarify.Perhaps not the right application for a snubber; but cansingle line to rode be a bridle?

I am familiar with several hitches and*could* use. them in a pinch ; but I'd sooner use a snap hook of some sort to speed thinhs alongg;) Would also mak. sstowing the rode end of bridle a tad easier..


Thanks all
 

·
Master Mariner
Joined
·
9,004 Posts
I'd just run on down to my local fire station and get some (usually free) used fire hose and put a 4' section on my rode as chafe gear (it will slide very easily up or down the rode), and run the anchor line out through a chock. You are just not dealing with loads big enough to warrant all the trouble you are thinking of going through, unless you plan on anchoring through a couple of hurricanes. We use fire hose on our 1" snub line which is almost 3 years old. That's nearly 1000 nights on the anchor and snub, in winds to maybe 50 or so in a few gusts, many, many nights to 35 knots, etc, and no significant chafe on the snub, which runs through a starboard side fore deck chock.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,491 Posts
The location of your "snubber" on your rode will change at each anchorage, depending on depth and scope. I don't see how you are going to do what you hope to do without using a hitch to attach the two. A rolling hitch is the right knot for this job and very easy to tie.

Nevertheless, you don't seem to be looking for a snubber as much as to eliminate chafe or reroute your rode to a different cleat. I would think there are more elegant solutions to this, but I can't fully picture your description of the problem. A pic may help.

One advantage of securing rode to a spot further down your bow from the roller, is it will increase scope for the same amount of rode payed out. Not sure if you have an anchor on the bow, but it could eliminate chafing against it as well.
 
  • Like
Reactions: jackdale

·
Registered
Joined
·
830 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
OK...let me try this approach... the"why" annd "what"
This is all in a effort to be able to deploy or retrieve the anchor while solo and or from the cockpit
I'll need a roller assb'y approximately 22 inches long. Because of the raised deck design and angle of the Danforth flukes when stowed; nearly/at least 14 inches (assumed by dwg it out) will need to protrude unsupported. Having hauled the anchor in some chop, I can atttest to a certain amount of tension on the rode. IMHO, that amount and type of pull on an anchor roller protruding that far out from support on the bow might be problematic.
I'd like to avoid disastrously folding the extension or to remove the need for an expensive and convoluted platform to support and strengthen the roller. Seems to me that having the rode run out and over the roller places more than comfortable forces on said hardware. Simply clipping off to the bow "eye" once scope is reached directs that tension elswhere; leaving slack from the attachment point, over the roller and back to the hawsepipe.
Let me try a scenario.
Anchor secured to rode, lying at rest on roller assb'y. Rode run back on deck, along cabin top to a handy spot; loosely looped over some bit deck hardware, then run fwd again to cleat, To add one more kink to the plan, a single block could be used at the turning point, with a retrieval line to be attached at/in the cockpit. Release line from loop-point.Anchor drops..Rode pays out from loose lay on deck. Go fwd and clip off to bow eye.. Set anchor. Retrieval could be as simple as the old ""Yo, heave Ho" or utilizing tthen additional block and line.. . Un-clip bridle.. Pull fwd to relieve tension on line.as usual. While going fwd, pull in retreival line/block untill anchornnrides up and onto the roller.. Secure anchor..

Having written all that out; I've answered a few kinks that I missed.. I'd need a folding roller and could utilize a sliding ring on the free end of the bridle, with a locking "stopper" fastened to the rode .

Did I miss anything? ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,491 Posts
I read it twice, but I must not be your man for this one. I'm having a hard time following.

Here are a couple of thoughts anyway.

If you are going to the effort to install a suitable bow eye, which is tough as it absolutely must have something backing it inside the bow, a support for the roller wouldn't seem harder.

Secondly, are you assuming you will pay out the same amount of rode at every anchorage?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,067 Posts
I'd suggest a 'prussik sling' attachment to the rode ... the sling is just an endless loop of either rope or tubular webbing, the total length of the 'sling' is small so that you wind up with a small section of loop available to attach the bridle line.

The prussik sling and bridle then pulled tight under the bow so that the prussik connect is AT the waterline at the bow. One typically needs hawse holes or chocks well back from the bow to so this.
The advantages will be that a boat that 'sails' on its anchor will have a greatly dampened motion at anchor, sometimes no swinging motion at all; and/plus you will have a greater scope advantage since the rode is not directly attached to the stem but the bow's waterline

Here's the sling-prussik... use 3 or more 'wraps' on the rode:

.
.
Here's how the bridle works:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,111 Posts
This is all in a effort to be able to deploy or retrieve the anchor while solo and or from the cockpit
OK, stop right there... What the hell is going on around here, lately, with all these needlessly complex 'solutions' to the simplest things ? :)

Sorry, I'm with Minnewaska, I'm simply not following what it is you're trying to accomplish, exactly... But why do you feel the need to be able to deploy or retrieve the anchor from the cockpit, on a boat where you can move between the foredeck and helm in a matter of seconds?

Seriously, keep it simple, and leave that "remote retrieval/deployment" stuff to the guys pushing an UP or DOWN button up on the flybridge of their 50' Sea Rays... :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,491 Posts
I'd suggest a 'prussik sling' attachment to the rode ... the sling is just an endless loop of either rope or tubular webbing, the total length of the 'sling' is small so that you wind up with a small section of loop available to attach the bridle line.

The prussik sling and bridle then pulled tight under the bow so that the prussik connect is AT the waterline at the bow. One typically needs hawse holes or chocks well back from the bow to so this.
The advantages will be that a boat that 'sails' on its anchor will have a greatly dampened motion at anchor, sometimes no swinging motion at all; and/plus you will have a greater scope advantage since the rode is not directly attached to the stem but the bow's waterline
I'm sure I'm just not following this whole topic very well. If I understand your suggestion, why would pulling this bridle set up tightly through the side chocks cause the rode to pull in at the water line and not just keep the original scope of the rode?

Secondly, I love the prussic knot, but not for this. They do not reset well if they become fully unloaded and we're not always pulling hard on an anchor rode. The individual wraps of the prussic have a desire to override on each other. Especially in the water, I think an unloaded prussic could become a rats nest. But, I've never tried it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
729 Posts
I've used three different knots in the past to attach a bridle to the rode. The rolling hitch is the easiest to do, but there is a problem with it becoming unloaded and I've had occasion where it has come undone. No problem with the prusik knot, but I prefer the klemheist knot because the load is applied in one direction.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
626 Posts
ok, stop right there... What the hell is going on around here, lately, with all these needlessly complex 'solutions' to the simplest things ? :)

sorry, i'm with minnewaska, i'm simply not following what it is you're trying to accomplish, exactly... But why do you feel the need to be able to deploy or retrieve the anchor from the cockpit, on a boat where you can move between the foredeck and helm in a matter of seconds?

Seriously, keep it simple, and leave that "remote retrieval/deployment" stuff to the guys pushing an up or down button up on the flybridge of their 50' sea rays... :)
+1...kiss
 

·
Bill SV Rangatira
Joined
·
421 Posts
I remember someone once had the chain running to twin nylon rodes hence giving you a bridle of sorts for retrieval perhaps a Scotsman on a trip ring would be your simplest solution for shock absorption twisted nylon works better than the double braid many seem to use but it has stowage issues or single plaited nylon for a little of each
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top