SailNet Community banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Daysailor wannabe cruiser
Joined
·
142 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Gang,

I'll be looking at a CD 25 and a Bristol 26 this week and I am curious what kind of opinions there are out there. Both builders seem to have good reputations and I have an idea of what things to look for at both boats. I'm curious on feedback on handling and sailing ability. This is going to be a weekender/daysailer in and around Tampa bay offshore occasionally but nothing serious. I've been looking for a CD25 or a Bristol 24 for a while because I like the way they look and they are 3-4' draft. The B26 I couldn't find much info on.

Any help is much appreciated
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
994 Posts
I wonder if you are actually trying to compare the Cape Dory 25D, which is an entirely different animal from the Cape Dory 25, with the Bristol 26.

The 25D's lines are shown in my avatar - don't know beans about the Bristol.

When you have compared, how about writing your opinions and feelings in this thread? I'd like to hear about it.
 

·
Mud Hen #69, Mad Hatter
Joined
·
415 Posts
I may be wrong on this, but it seems that at one point when I was considering a Bristol 29 that I learned Bristols were built on hulls molded at Tillotson-Pearson. I'm pretty sure the Bristol 27 is simply a deluxe rendition of the Triton.

Don't know about the Bristol 26. I did find that the 27 was, in fact, a collaboration between Clint Pearson and Carl Alberg. Practical Sailor rated it small but very well constructed. "Built like a brick lighthouse"
 

·
Administrator
Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
Joined
·
9,959 Posts
Delirious, with all due respect you are mistaken on all points.

The original Pearson Yachts was started by two cousins, Clint and Everett. Everett started Tillotson-Pearson, which was a contact composites company that happened to produce boats. Clint started Bristol Yachts. Clint hired Carl Alberg to design the Bristol 27. The Bristol 27 has no significant relationship to the Triton other than the names of the players, and was in no way deluxe as compared to the Triton or especially robustly built. I know the Bristol 27's pretty well and saw how much to took to beef one up to go offshore.

And the Bristol 27 bears very little resemblance to the Bristol 26 which was a Halsey Herreschoff design and a great little boat. If I had to chose between a Bristol 26 and a CD 25 to be used on the west coast of Florida, assuming reasonably similar condition, it would be a no brainer to pick the Bristol which should be a far better sailer in the prevailing conditions.

Jeff
 

·
Telstar 28
Joined
·
993 Posts
Just curious as to whether the OP could clarify whether he was looking at a Cape Dory 25 or a Cape Dory 25D... which are very different boats.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
134 Posts
Jeff, I'm not sure which thread, but I thought you wrote that you thought less of the Bristol 29.9, rather than Bristol 30.. ??? could you expand on that or was I hallucinating..? thanks..
 

·
Daysailor wannabe cruiser
Joined
·
142 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
OP here looked at Bristol 26

Ok folks so far I have only seen the Bristol 26. I liked the boat and it was in ok condition with soft spots only in the aft deck above and around the motor well. The specs online show very different boats. For some reason I was thinking the CD 25 was like the Bristol 24 but they are very different, and the B26 is quite different that the B24 so I am really comparing apples to oranges here sorry to bring up this comparison but I'll update for posterity when I see the CD25(not CD25D for those who were asking.)

The Bristol had probably 5 10 headroom as I at 6' was slouching. The head is enclosed but I cannot realistically see myself in there with the door shut(not enough for the legs).

Seemed like a quality boat with a decent amount of room for an old 26 footer. The guy is willing to go to a very cheap undisclosed price do to his circumstances(age, health, etc.) Even though this boat is cheap and the rigging is new I'm still concerened enough about a couple of things(rudder shaft, head, etc ) not to bite on it right away. I'll wait till I see some other boats and then decide if what to do. I'll send an update after I see the CD25.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Weel good luck , there , I have a Bristol and they are well built, mine is a 1974 year and has no soft spots , no leaks, it is easy to sail , single handed, and can sail itself if you get the sails balanced pretty well , just lash the both jib sheets to the opposite side of the tiller with 1 (one turn around each cockpit side mounted winces and she sails herself pretty well, for a while anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Hey, you know your boat is old , when. . .
the vessels spec sheet is in cubits. . .
and . . .
the documentation list Noah, Cleopatra, and Columbus as previous owners,
the radio set is 2 tin cans and a really really long string!
hahahah!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
652 Posts
They are both great small boats, you won't go wrong with either one. Just pick the one you like best - have it surveyed, then buy it and go sailing.
John, s/v Paloma, B29.9 #141
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
This thread is a few years old, but nevertheless, I'll point out the biggest difference in these boats: the Bristol is a MUCH bigger boat, in spite of them having nearly the same length over all.

The Bristol is 8 feet wide. The Cape Dory is 7.25 feet wide. This is a significant difference in beam.

In displacement, the Bristol is almost 6000 lbs. The Cape Dory is 4000 lbs. That's a huge difference.

The Bristol also has more sail area and a taller mast.
 

·
Administrator
Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
Joined
·
9,959 Posts
This thread is a few years old, but nevertheless, I'll point out the biggest difference in these boats: the Bristol is a MUCH bigger boat, in spite of them having nearly the same length over all.

The Bristol is 8 feet wide. The Cape Dory is 7.25 feet wide. This is a significant difference in beam.

In displacement, the Bristol is almost 6000 lbs. The Cape Dory is 4000 lbs. That's a huge difference.

The Bristol also has more sail area and a taller mast.
You are certainly correct about the Bristol 26 being a much larger boat than the Cape Dory 25. The Bristol has a much longer waterline which also adds a lot to its interior volume. The net result is that although being heavier overall, the Bristol has a much smaller L/D. They do have similar SA/D's but the Bristol should have more usable stability and a much nicer motion.

Jeff
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,220 Posts
Had a CD with a outboard in a well. It sucked. In any kind of following sea that compartment got real wet. After that starting the engine was a sometimes thing. If the engine was running when that compartment flooded the engine would suck in water and then you had a sailboat not a sailing auxiliary. Would stay away from any sailboat of any brand with that or similar set up up.
Also had a CD 30. It was awesome. Simple cutter rig. I had no trouble taking it Massachusetts to Maine by myself. Line squall or gale drop the yankee and reef the main and you were fine.
Still everything of that era has a really small interior for loa. Only exception in my mind is the BCC28 which is a small ship with great storage for size.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
496 Posts
The original CD 25 - very little head room - had about as much space as a Catalina 22 down below - plus the bunks are short - being 6'2" nothing was long enough to lay down - built like a tank though - would be a good, but slow day sailor - never liked the engine well - much better having an engine on a bracket to easily get it out of water when not in use. ( the engine well would be OK in fresh water)
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top