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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I've really love to find a Bristol 32 in my price range (15K - 20K) but any I have found are in need of major work (interior completely gutted, centerboard glassed in ??). It's a great boat, seems well built, although a bit small and not much storage.

I've recently found an Endeavor 32 in good shape which has had most major work done.

So what would you do? Wait for the boat with a better "pedigree", perhaps smaller interior but very well built, possibly in need of major work, or settle for the Endeavor?
 

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That Drunk Guy
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How long have you been looking? Just like women it seems that as soon as you stop looking, one shows up. And the worst part is, as soon as you "settle" on that Endeavor, a Bristol will come up for sale! ;)
 

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I have an E32 and in my (biased) opinion it is a great boat for what you describe. She sails well, has enough room and storage below for 2-3 people to cruise pretty comfortably, has great ventilation with all of the opening ports, and is built solidly enough that I have never had any concerns about her coming apart in a stiff breeze. I am a coastal sailor, and I've been out in the Atlantic when the winds were in the 30-35 kt range.

I looked at a lot of boats before I bought my Endeavor, and what sold me was the condition of the boat as much as anything. Whether it's a Bristol, and Endeavour, or a Hinckley, if it hasn't been maintained it's going to be a mess.

If you're ever down in S. Fla look me up....I'd be happy to have you out for a test sail.
 

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I will 2nd the plug for the Endeavour 32. Over the past 40 years I have owed a many different brands of sailboats from 24' to 39', and all have had +s' and -s'. I've owned an Endeavour 32, for about 4 years in Florida, and I have been very happy with it.

PS The work on a sailboat is never done!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
I have an E32 and in my (biased) opinion it is a great boat for what you describe. She sails well, has enough room and storage below for 2-3 people to cruise pretty comfortably, has great ventilation with all of the opening ports, and is built solidly enough that I have never had any concerns about her coming apart in a stiff breeze. I am a coastal sailor, and I've been out in the Atlantic when the winds were in the 30-35 kt range.

I looked at a lot of boats before I bought my Endeavor, and what sold me was the condition of the boat as much as anything. Whether it's a Bristol, and Endeavour, or a Hinckley, if it hasn't been maintained it's going to be a mess.

If you're ever down in S. Fla look me up....I'd be happy to have you out for a test sail.
Thanks, yes, I've read that the Endeavor is "under-rated".. and a great boat. That's why I considered it in the first place. I've read good things about it being solidly built. I just can't get a solid answer in the deck... is it a 3/4" plywood core?
 

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The deck, cabin trunk, and cockpit sole have plywood core on the E32's, but I'm not sure if it's 3/4. As with any boat with coring (and almost all do) you have to look at the areas where there are penetrations in the deck to see if any water has gotten in and damaged the coring. On my boat there are no issues, but it had been maintained pretty well by the previous owners.

The hulls are solid glass.

Selecting a boat is a tough process, at least it was for me. I looked seriously at a couple of dozen boats, sailed a couple of them, and spent a ton of time looking at Yachtworld and walking docks. I developed a pretty serious crush for the Cape Dory 33, but similar to your experience with the Bristol the ones I looked at were either trashed or well out of my price range.

When I found my boat it was in great shape, and that's what was most important to me. I wanted to spend my time sailing, not repairing!
 

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Tartan 27' owner
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The cabin on the E 32' is huge and can be quite gorgeous when all the wood is varnished up nicely. We recently had 3 adults on my friends E 32' on the Chesapeake for a weekend outing - very comfortable. We have also had 5 or more adults on board for a weekend but that was crowded.
The E 32' is a capable coastal cruiser and some owners do range up & down the coast and over to the Bahamas. Strider Index
As for the sailing characteristics of the E 32' I hope you can get out for a sail on one. It might not be a great racing boat but it is a good cruising boat.
I'd give it a serious looking at.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks, yeah I'm not interested in racing seriously... I would race week nights just as an excuse to sail every week, but am not looking for a racing boat.

Cabin comfort is a bigger concern, and comfortable sailing characteristics (no pounding, etc).

Everything I've read says the Endeavor is a comfortable and reasonably sturdy boat.

If you were inspecting the deck, what would you consider repairable? For example, you are tapping around and find a few areas that give you a dull thud on deck, but still feel very solid. Would you accept this?

You find a very small area (6 inches) in the cockpit that is actually soft.. you can feel there is a soft spot. Accept it and grind it out and fill it, or assume this is a sign of bigger problems?

Every boat I've looked at so far has possible core damage according to tap test but still feel solid. I would expect to find some water damage in most balsa core, not sure about plywood core.

Thanks
 

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I just looked at yachtworld and found three Bristols in or near your price range, and if you can believe the photos seem to be in good condition.
Consider the B32 vs E32 carefully. If you are soloing you may find the quarter berth more desireable for daily life and for having guests aboard in the Vee berth. Otherwise some one is sleeping in the main living space. Also, for overnight passages with crew, the quarter berth will be very convenient.
Look closely at the galley. You will need a stove with an oven, refrigerator and a good sink. Otherwise it's camping, which doesn't work out so well for the long haul.
Both of yes boats have 65-75 gallon water tanks and would benefit with more for extended cruising.
The E32 has 3.25 more feet of waterline length than the B32, which translates to about 0.4 more knots speed. There is a real safety factor in that difference for coastal cruising.
Also, both of these boats are pretty old designs and lack some comfort features common to newer designs, like stand up heads and showers.
While the B32 is gorgeous, the E32 is also a good looker and has a more live-able interior, which plays out big time while at anchor, which will be most of the time.
Finally, I think you will appreciate the better close quarters handling of the E32 over the B32 every time you come in to a dock.
Isn't it fun, this boat decision process?
Good luck,
John
 

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Tartan 27' owner
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Almost any boat you look at of this vintage will have cored decks, so deck delamination is not something specific to the E 32'. Builders typically used 1/2" Balsa end grain plywood for the core. How do I know this? I re-cored both side decks on my Tartan 27' and found 40+ year old rotten Balsa core in some spots. My friends E 32' has one deck soft spot just aft the foredeck on the stbd side but there is a visible crack in the outer skin in this area. The E 32' has an inside headliner that would add to the level of difficulty re-coring deck sections.
What is specific to the E 32' is that the original Beckson port lights are made of plastic, are cheap and do not inspire "blue water" confidence, which is why some E32' owners have upgraded to Newfound Metals ports ($$$$). The Beckson replacement ports are still available and are < $200 a piece but with 10 port lights it becomes a more than trivial project to install all new ones.
I'm also not crazy about the location of the original fuel tank, down in the bilge. A few owners have moved their fuel tanks under the cabin sole - which is an improvement in my opinion.
Access to the stuffing box is difficult but this is true on so many different sailboats.
 

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Looks like previous owner(s) of E32 have taken time and dollars to maintain boat
on some major systems. One might think and could confirm with a survey that
the same attention may have been given to other systems/items small and large
like maybe the motor, no small piece of the puzzle. (yanmar, westerbeke?)
Maybe the B32 not so much.
 

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How long have you been looking? Just like women it seems that as soon as you stop looking, one shows up. And the worst part is, as soon as you "settle" on that Endeavor, a Bristol will come up for sale! ;)
also, just like women:D
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks guys, the Endeavor was great, but ended up passing (not the fault of the boat)... I ran into some logistical and financial hangups involved in getting her back to my side of the state.

The Endeavor was very solid and huge inside as described though. Thanks for the help.
 
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