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Pictures would be a big help. On my B32 the starboard birth pulls out to make a bouddle birth. And the port side has a hamic. Both have blocks to hold them up.
 

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Does anyone know how the deck to hull joint is achieved? We've rebed everything, but still get some water in the shelves throughout the cabin. We're thinking of sealing the toerail better as I guess this design has the inboard flange. Although, I can't find moisture on any bolts. Perhaps the liner could be be bringing water from another location and finding it's way into the cabin. Thanks for any input.
We do have detailed hull to deck joint details in the yahoo group. Is there a sail track on the deck? Also the water could be coming from above like you say...handrails, turtle, windows are famous for leaking and the dorades.
 

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I must say that is a good example of how not to do a hull to deck joint repair. The choice of 5200 as a sealant material, the use of a single layer of fiberglass cloth with polyester resin to seal the openings, mixing silicone sealant into the collection of materials, creating a straight path with the new screws for water entry. Its a lot of work and I hoped it kept the water out, but it does not strike me as a long term solution.

Jeff
 

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I must say that is a good example of how not to do a hull to deck joint repair. The choice of 5200 as a sealant material, the use of a single layer of fiberglass cloth with polyester resin to seal the openings, mixing silicone sealant into the collection of materials, creating a straight path with the new screws for water entry. Its a lot of work and I hoped it kept the water out, but it does not strike me as a long term solution.

Jeff
If you read the pdf, you will see it was not my project. I would agree that the joint should not be glassed over. The joint needs to move some. But the use of 5200 would work fine for the joint. I would also not use bytul for bedding the toe rail. The diagram was to show how Bristol made the hull to deck connection and mounted the toe. Not condoning how this person did his repair.

But as far as I know, this work has held up just fine.
 

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If you read the pdf, you will see it was not my project. I would agree that the joint should not be glassed over. The joint needs to move some. But the use of 5200 would work fine for the joint. I would also not use bytul for bedding the toe rail. The diagram was to show how Bristol made the hull to deck connection and mounted the toe. Not condoning how this person did his repair.

But as far as I know, this work has held up just fine.
Eric,

I did not mean to imply that this was your project. What concerns me is that methods described in that monograph seemed like a pretty poor way to do this. My reason for commenting is that someone else might think that this sounds like a good way to go. This all may sound like nitpicking, but when you think about the cost to do this and the time involved, it seems like a waste to not make better choices of materials and methods.

More specifically, I am not sure that I would say that the hull to deck joint should not be glassed over, but if it is, there should be enough layers of cloth to create a watertight and structural connection. Making the choice to glass the joint over is made worse by the decision to only apply a single layer of cloth and by using polyester resin which tends to form a weaker bond than epoxy. As you noted this becomes more critical since the fabric bridges a joint which inherently flexes.

Adding to the problem and maybe more critically, depending on the year of this boat, Bristol bed its toe rails in polysulfide caulk, which tends to leech into the gelcoat over time making a bond to the gelcoat less reliable as well. Lastly, the single layup of fiberglass cloth is likely not to be totally filled with resin sufficiently that it will be water tight where it crosses the abandoned fastening holes.

While 5200 makes a good adhesive and reasonably good caulk, smeared into the joint, and bolt holes, it is not all that likely to act as a particularly effective sealant.

I actually like the idea of using butyl to bed the toerail, especially to a plastic material that is likely to expand linearly with temperature. Butyl seems to tolerate movement and reseals itself as long as dirt does not get into the joint. But in using butyl the holes should have a tapered countersink at the bolts where they pass into the fiberglass.

I would also be concerned about using bolts with finishing washers since they tend to funnel water into the bolt hole where the water can freeze and thaw.

Jeff
 

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My understanding is that 5200 is very hard to remove and the substrate would give before the 5200. I was told that 4200 would suffice as it has more flexibility. We've sealed the toerail with a degree of success with water intrusion, but will continue to seal the jib track bolts.
 

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My understanding is that 5200 is very hard to remove and the substrate would give before the 5200.
While it is true that 5200 is hard to remove, in the case of fiberglass or teak, its not likely that the substrate would give before the 5200. When you hear comments like that, it is usually based on some form of an impromptu peel test. Normally removing an object held by 5200 starts with slicing the 5200 and then using a scraper to remove it. I understand that there are also chemical bond releasers that work on 5200.

My bigger problem with 5200 is that in my experience its a great adhesive, but long term its not all that effective as a sealant.

Jeff
 
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