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I am looking at purchasing a 73 Bristol 35 center board keel.
The center board was removed at some point. If I get this boat I would like to replace the centerboard. I'm not having any luck on finding information- drawings, experience, knowledge is greatly welcome.
 

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I just wrote up my 35.5 CB replacement in this month's Good Old Boat magazine, including measuring, designing and build
Any chance of getting a link to the info on this repair and or post the info here on sailnet for preservation? I'm not sure how long GOB keeps their articles. And I can not find your article in GOB. I think it would be more help to other Bristol owners to have the info on a Bristol forum.

Thanks,
 

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Guy in NJ parting out a Pearson 35 and has the centerboard for sale. May fit.
 

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I own an older Pearson Wanderer with a full keel and centerboard, drawing 3'-6" (up) / 7'-0" (dn). Being new to CB's, I asked about the benefits of having the CB down while having the boat surveyed. The seasoned surveyor said you can expect to gain 2 to 3 degrees on the wind and make slightly less leeway. He said many people abandon them and never look back - unless you are racing or traveling long distances they can be more trouble than they are worth on an older vessel. That being said, I plan on keeping and using mine, but for others it may be a viable option to omit the CB.

Best,
doo
 

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Being new to CB's, I asked about the benefits of having the CB down while having the boat surveyed. The seasoned surveyor said you can expect to gain 2 to 3 degrees on the wind and make slightly less leeway. He said many people abandon them and never look back - unless you are racing or traveling long distances they can be more trouble than they are worth on an older vessel.
There is a bit more to CB benefits. I would add the following:
- less heel when deployed from additional surface and weight below
- helps to balance the boat (less weather helm) which is important when using wind vane or autopilot.
- when negotiating a shallow water area (in sand or mud) centerboard can be used as a depth gauge.
 

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There is a bit more to CB benefits. I would add the following:
- less heel when deployed from additional surface and weight below
- helps to balance the boat (less weather helm) which is important when using wind vane or autopilot.
- when negotiating a shallow water area (in sand or mud) centerboard can be used as a depth gauge.
+1 on that!

I find that there is very little maintenance to the Crb...check the cable every 5 years and replace the sheaves and cable every 20 years.
 

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I own an older Pearson Wanderer with a full keel and centerboard, drawing 3'-6" (up) / 7'-0" (dn). Being new to CB's, I asked about the benefits of having the CB down while having the boat surveyed. The seasoned surveyor said you can expect to gain 2 to 3 degrees on the wind and make slightly less leeway. He said many people abandon them and never look back - unless you are racing or traveling long distances they can be more trouble than they are worth on an older vessel. That being said, I plan on keeping and using mine, but for others it may be a viable option to omit the CB.

Best,
doo
I think it really depends on the boat, and it's sailing characteristics. Some centerboard/swing keel really are such poor performers that it does not matter. That seems to be where the thought of them being unnecessary came from. Also some boats seem to implement the raising mechanism better than others. A third factor is how much of a keel is there that the board goes into. Some have a pretty long and fairly effective keel without the centerboard. Seems many Endeavor 32s just eliminate it. Not sure what I would do, but it really does not seem like the maintenance is going to be all that expensive anyway. A cable (many replace with Dynema) is cheap and even if the pivot pin goes out it may be a pain in the arse to dig the old one out, not very expensive or difficult to replace once it is dug out.

But I have heard more than one sailor say they don't bother with it. I do know one boat I have sailed on with a centerboard gets really really bad weather helm without it being down. To the point that I was holding the tiller, and pushing with my legs on the opposite side of the cockpit. The wind had kicked up pretty bad unexpectedly and we were heading in anyway and it had to be brought up before going in so we just dealt with it.
 

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I own an older Pearson Wanderer with a full keel and centerboard, drawing 3'-6" (up) / 7'-0" (dn). Being new to CB's, I asked about the benefits of having the CB down while having the boat surveyed. The seasoned surveyor said you can expect to gain 2 to 3 degrees on the wind and make slightly less leeway. He said many people abandon them and never look back - unless you are racing or traveling long distances they can be more trouble than they are worth on an older vessel. That being said, I plan on keeping and using mine, but for others it may be a viable option to omit the CB.

Best,
doo
On average, I gain 5 to 10 degrees to windward with the board down. An easy check is to watch your GPS course (both heading and recorded track) with the board up close hauled.

After you've established an average heading-board up, let it down. Recalculate after a bit and compare.

More than once, I've heard people say there's no difference. All boats are different but I think sailors vary more than boats.
 

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My centerboard is a must. Night and day difference. As krisscross detailed. Even when motoring, very noticeable, negates prop walk felt in forward with allot of throttle. Bristol Crb are not heavy (not part of, or help with ballast), mine is plywood and glass, has zinc weights so it won't float when deployed. 80 lbs max. On the plus side, if the cable lets go, it will do little damage.

I considered using Amteel when I replaced the cable during my last Crb rebuild. I even bought it to use. But after reading up on amsteel, two thing were an issue: 1) abrasion and 2) UV degradation. Okay, so I have the only Bristol in the world that the cable is exposed to sunlight? And, the last two stainless cables lasted over 20 years each. Why change with that record?
 

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Here is the fun I had last year. My setup is very unique, I have not heard of another one like it. In some ways it is good and simple. But I have a cable pole int the main cabin that is a small PITA. And a cable that runs over the deck. I believe that the reason the sheave blocks gave way to galvanic corrosion is because the boat yard that fixed it last, 20 years ago, used SS sheaves instead of bronze. I used fiberglass reinforced nylon sheaves.

http://www.sailnet.com/forums/gear-maintenance/108089-centerboard-repair-bristol-32-a.html
 

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Any chance of getting a link to the info on this repair and or post the info here on sailnet for preservation? I'm not sure how long GOB keeps their articles. And I can not find your article in GOB. I think it would be more help to other Bristol owners to have the info on a Bristol forum.

Thanks,
The article is in the current issue of Good Old Boat, July/August 2015. Out of respect for the publisher, I will hold off posting it until later.
 

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The article is in the current issue of Good Old Boat, July/August 2015. Out of respect for the publisher, I will hold off posting it until later.
It's an excellent article, and worth the buy off the rack. Actually, GOB and Practical Sailor are both worth the subscription price.
 

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On average, I gain 5 to 10 degrees to windward with the board down. An easy check is to watch your GPS course (both heading and recorded track) with the board up close hauled.

After you've established an average heading-board up, let it down. Recalculate after a bit and compare.

More than once, I've heard people say there's no difference. All boats are different but I think sailors vary more than boats.
My centerboard is a must. Night and day difference. As krisscross detailed. Even when motoring, very noticeable, negates prop walk felt in forward with allot of throttle. Bristol Crb are not heavy (not part of, or help with ballast), mine is plywood and glass, has zinc weights so it won't float when deployed. 80 lbs max. On the plus side, if the cable lets go, it will do little damage.

I considered using Amteel when I replaced the cable during my last Crb rebuild. I even bought it to use. But after reading up on amsteel, two thing were an issue: 1) abrasion and 2) UV degradation. Okay, so I have the only Bristol in the world that the cable is exposed to sunlight? And, the last two stainless cables lasted over 20 years each. Why change with that record?
Agree with both of these. Cb makes huge difference in pointing in my P35, and given that it is heavier, I notice a difference in heel as well. I'm sure it's partly the lift and changing the resistance to leeway, but I think it's also partly lowering the CG as well.
 

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The article is in the current issue of Good Old Boat, July/August 2015. Out of respect for the publisher, I will hold off posting it until later.
Is it later yet? Any chance you can pass this info onto Bristol owners?
 

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Agree with both of these. Cb makes huge difference in pointing in my P35, and given that it is heavier, I notice a difference in heel as well. I'm sure it's partly the lift and changing the resistance to leeway, but I think it's also partly lowering the CG as well.
Also own a Pearson 35. The board does make a difference in leeway when hard on the wind. As soon as I crack the sheets and sail a bit freer, the board really has little effect other than more wetted surface. Seldom deploy it except when I want the least leeway possible beating. Try not to get in that situation so very seldom drop the board. I'm going to try it motoring with it deployed to see if it decreases the turning radius and helps to keep the bow from blowing off when turning into a windward slip. The board is not that heavy so has virtually no effect on the righting moment.

Some people use the board as a lead line. Feel that is very dangerous if you want to keep the board. Purposely leaving it down till it touches bottom is asking for a bent or busted board. With a little leeway or it stuck in the mud, there will be tremendous side/twisting force on the board. At more than $3,000 to buy a new board, don't want to take a chance on busting the board. H

Maintenance on the C/B boats I've earned has been minimal. The Morgan 35 I owned years ago had electrolysis problems with the lifting cable. Meant it had to be hauled yearly to replace the cable. A Dyneema cable would solve that problem permanently today. Have switched to a Dyneema cable on the P35 and it's worked without a problem. Of course the galvanized cable that the PO put in was just starting to get rusty after 6 years so the switch to synthetic cable wasn't really necessary. Did jamb the board in the well with a couple of small rocks after a grounding the Morgan. A few pokes with a screwdriver dislodged the rocks and all was back to normal.

All boats are different. Some say boat balances better with centerboard partially or fully deployed have found it makes little to no difference on my boats. There will be less leeway hard on the wind with the board down. the board has little effect on leeway once the sheets are eased. Hard to believe that the boat will heal less with the board down unless it is a drop keel boat like a Hobie 33. The boards on almost all boats are fiberglass covered foam with just enough ballast for them to deploy. These boards just do not have enough weight to effect the righting moment.
 
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