SailNet Community banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
275 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
This thread is started to avoid hijacking another thread where BobMcGov described the Buccaneer 18, in discussing room-for-four in a dinghy, as follows:
"Bucc18 is lots of things, but stable ain't one of them. It's the tenderest bluddy vessel I've ever set foot in. Ripping good time if you're willing to hike below the knees, but a mischievous, wet, ill-tempered, overpowered minx. We tend to obsess over our bailers: the most important feature on the boat! While the Bucc18 has a large cockpit, large CB case + location of the mainsheet and vang make more than three people impractical -- the boat is too tippy to sit anyone to leeward."

My wife and I are mid-50s and (quite capably) trailer-sail an O'Day Daysailer as our family boat. We're considering a second boat, a Buccaneer, for exclusive use at a nearby lake's yacht club for Sunday races and quick evening picnic sails together or with another couple.

Basic Buccaneer questions.

1. At our age, we're fine participating in the race, we don't have to win. Sitting on the rail; absolutely; but full-extension hiking may be a stretch at our age. Would you advise that the Bucc is "too much boat"?

2. Your thoughts on the Bucc assuming we sail the boat well "under the limit" for a picnic sail for four. Would a Bucc be suitable?

I ask because I have a line on a Bucc that hasn't moved from under its framed-tarp in the side yard in five years... and at that time the owner had it in his front yard looking for $1400... I think now he might say take it away for half that and I'm tempted... but not if it is really not suitable for my intended use.

Thanks for any insights you can offer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,856 Posts
I own a Mutineer which is the 15 foot version of the Buccaneer, many parts are interchangeable between the 2 boats. I also sailed Buccaneer's! Every said above in blue is true. Thats makes it fun. Thats because the center board is fiberglass and has little weight to add any stability or righting effort. I am mid 50's and I love my Mutineer. I have a big boat also, but there is something about a planing hull and getting wet i still enjoy.

All that being said, its as much fun as you can have sailing a small boat. You will be fine with the boat, as she will tell you when you are pushing her. Buy the boat. If not let me know where the boat is.
 

·
Top Sekret Ninja Sailor
Joined
·
216 Posts
My sister and her husband have a Buccaneer 18. He is 64, and she is 60. They have never commented that it is too much boat.

I also have a friend that just picked up a beater 505, and he is in his late 50's to early 60's.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
I bought a 1970 Buccaneer several months back. Spent some time fixing it. A few weeks ago I took it for a first sail. It was gusty. We were going with jib only, and we were going like stink. Wouldn't even dream of using the mainsail (it's much bigger than the jib) with that kind of wind. After the first sail, I added a reef point to the main. I would say the buc is fine as long as you sail in moderate winds. If I had to do it again, I would probably search for a Harpoon 5.2 instead of a Buccaneer.
 

·
baDumbumbum
Joined
·
1,142 Posts
If you can get it for $700 and the sails & furler are half decent, why not have a go? If you don't like it, I promise someone like Bubb2 will buy it for more than you paid. The class is strong and growing like a weed, mainly because it's a fun mob and the boat is so cheap to own. Picnic cruise for four ... if the winds are light, shur. If they pick up, hope you have good PFDs.

For mellow(er) outings, I'd consider adding jiffy reefing to the boat. Since it's mainly raced as a one-design, most Buccs won't have reefing points. But I found the boat is MUCH sweeter above 12 kts if you can take 30" or so out of the sail. It has a tall mast for its weight and hull form, and the "powerhead" main creates a lot of heeling moment. Then you can keep the (very small) jib out, which alleviates some of its brutal weather helm.

Other points: old Buccs were made by at least four builders, and now Nickels Boat Works. The original Chryslers were pretty good; those built by TMI should be avoided, as the hull quality tends to be poor. Starwind and Cardinal are okay -- often lighter than the Chryslers, tho spar quality can be hit or miss. Sight down the boom and see how much curve it has. It will typically bow a bit, but some are quite radically bent. Also, it's really preferred if the mast step has been boosted a foot and a tabernacle installed; especially for an older couple, raising the mast is MUCH easier with the hinged base.

Rudder cheeks should be drilled aluminum plate; the original baroque casting is prone to breakage. The original pintle clips were trash; everybody pins them so the rudder doesn't fall off. Jib is best tensioned via a 'magic box' on the mast, a common retrofit from the original under-deck hyfield lever. It's not a hard boat to right, but close-fitting hatch and lazarette covers will keep it from sinking in the meantime. I say if you can steal it, do -- at least it gets the thing back in circulation! You'll never have more fun in a crappy old boat, I promise.:D

ETA: What FrancoC said: we surfed home one day on jib only in 30 knots -- chop made an accidental jibe too likely to fly the main. With two up and a boat chock full of camping gear, we averaged 7.5 knots downwind on 61 sqft of sail. And the boat moves on days when you swear there is no wind at all. Great hull, but a real workout in windy/gusty places like Wyoming or Texas.
 

·
Ruler of Wind and Wave
Joined
·
31 Posts
Go for it

I'm 61 and the wife is 55. No problem handling the Bucc after you get used to the power. Much fun. I also singlehand in medium air under main and jib and under main alone in a breeze.

Our's is for sale here in the classifieds only because we're moving up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I spotted a neglected Buccaneer, at a storage facility, flat tires, rusted trailer, uncovered and uncared for, hunted the owner down and now it is mine. I'm 58, wife is 55, have some work to do and I could use some ideas.
The hatch cover rotted off long ago, figured on replacing with white plexiglass. The halyards need relacing, the engine mount has lost its wood and braces are rusted, interior v berth area has plastic coating pulling up with wet wood beneath. Tiller handle is so baddly rotted it doesn't resemble a tiller ahndle and leaves me no pattern for a new one. I can't find any spec's of diagrams for this craft. Help
 

·
Ruler of Wind and Wave
Joined
·
31 Posts
Deanooo,
This thread is about the Chrysler Buccaneer 18 foot. I think you may have a Bayliner Bucanneer..... maybe a 27 foot? Is that right? If I find any info. I'll pass it on.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top