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Discussion Starter #1
[This forum is so useless I couldn't find a better section to put this in.]

General info for Google's future reference.

In London I am using Butane cooking gas instead of the normal Propane.
(my propane tank has the 'other' fitting on it so had to switch.)

Anyway, Butane doesn't work very well in cold temperatures! Below 0c /32f it doesn't work at all as the liquid doesn't convert to gas.
At 3 or 4C is produces so little gas the stove barely stays lit

Soooooooooo last night I invited 2 friend for dinner - roast pork with crackling......
Outside its about 4 degrees. I lit the stove and the tiny flame made me think the tank was empty but shaking it showed plenty.
Sooooooo I had to take the butane cylinder below and heat it with a fan heater!

Sensational dinner after that.

Moral to the story:
*Propane is better
*Never leave the tropics
*Never invite friends
*Obtain a girlfriend and blame the *****.



Mark
 

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HANUMAN
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[This forum is so useless I couldn't find a better section to put this in.]

General info for Google's future reference.

In London I am using Butane cooking gas instead of the normal Propane.
(my propane tank has the 'other' fitting on it so had to switch.)

Anyway, Butane doesn't work very well in cold temperatures! Below 0c /32f it doesn't work at all as the liquid doesn't convert to gas.
At 3 or 4C is produces so little gas the stove barely stays lit

Soooooooooo last night I invited 2 friend for dinner - roast pork with crackling......
Outside its about 4 degrees. I lit the stove and the tiny flame made me think the tank was empty but shaking it showed plenty.
Sooooooo I had to take the butane cylinder below and heat it with a fan heater!

Sensational dinner after that.

Moral to the story:
*Propane is better
*Never leave the tropics
*Never invite friends
*Obtain a girlfriend and blame the *****.



Mark
Put the butane tank on the stove to heat it up. Lay down for a nap. I don't see the problem here.
 

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Any butane appliance will work just fine off propane, just need adapters for the different valves.

"LPG" sold in different locations is a varying mix of the two depending on local conditions.

Refillable bottles you can put in either or a mix, just do it outdoors, and make sure not to overfill, an accurate scale is best.
 

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Living where I do I can confirm propane suffers from the same problems... but usually not until around -40 below zero. The tanks do struggle sometimes close to freezing temps if you have the valves turned wide open using lots of gas. More gas exiting the bottle = more cooling effect = less flow. I've seen 1lbs propane tanks frost completely over running lanterns at 3deg C.

Maybe the propane tank should be in the ice box. Might as well use the cold? :wink
 

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For those of you who are not educated in science, every liquid has a pressure/temperature relationship that is fixed. I don't remember the boiling point of butane at sea level from the top of my head but I think it is around 30F or -01C. When I did a lot of backpacking and carried a butane mousetrap stove we put the canister at the bottom of my sleeping bag but my stove also had a loop of tubing around the burner to completely vaporize the butane before it reached the burner orifice. The boiling point of propane at sea level is around -49F, we are now using it as a refrigerant due to the continual rapid phasing out of all the refrigerants we have been using in the industry since the late 1980's. Alcohol works because the heat of the flame creates the vapors that actually burn, the same as kerosene. You are dealing with two different applications.
 

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Propane problems in the cold are usually solved by going to bigger tanks, or multiple ones daisy-chained.

It's actually the liquid's surface area makes the difference, so horizontal tanks help, so usually fixed ASME type in the States, or forklift bottles can be adapted.
 

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██▓▓▒▒░&
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Mark, you've missed some other current threads recently discussing butane and the cold.

If you're looking for a cheap temporary cooking solution, look for "camping gaz" canisters. They contain isobutane, a mix of butane with enough propane in them to keep working in the cold. Anywhere from $10 for a decent single-screw-on burner, to better stoves from MSR which can take the gaz canister in the normal upright position, or inverted, which allows the stove to preheat and vaporize the fuel, even in colder weather.

Or a classic inexpensive Svea or Optimus camping stove, single burner, compact, running on white gasoline.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Only ever had one fire on board.

My parents boat had an alcohol stove. Mum refused to light the f'er and even I, the family pyromaniac, was a bit dubious of it.... So Dad had to light it while Mum and me would stand on the back deck donning water-wings.

Anyway, this day Dad lit the f'er and the f'ing flames shot sky high in the galley. So Dad and I each grabbed a fire extinguisher - - remember those old dry chemical ones? - - and Dad and I hit the red tabs and squirted the fire... Except the powder came out in a dribble like 2 incontinent old men.
Mum, **** I hate women, saved the day and the boat but not our dignity by chucking her knee-warming-throw-rug on the fire instantly smothering it. :(

She then threw Dad and me out of the cabin for the 4 (FOUR) hours it took to clean the white Dry Chemical off every surface in the boat we now hated.

Never have an alcohol stove. You'll lose your Mojo.

:crying
 
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