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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Howdy.

New to the site, new to the sea (sailing-wise). I'm considering buying an O'day 272 to serve as a liveaboard. I hardly know a thing about sailboats really, and even though I intend to learn it all real soon here, at the moment it's really about a means to an end for me. I want to rent a slip at a marina and stay there while I fix this boat up and get it sea-worthy. Renting a slip is cheap and I think I can handle the lifestyle for a while, being the wild man I am.

Anyway, I found this boat in Wilmington, NC where I live and it's in my price range, ...$1400, cause it's pretty beat up. The guy told me it sank when the through-hull came out recently which is my main concern about it. I also noticed about a foot long crack in the hull high above the water line where its been bumping the dock. What I need to know is what the perils are, if any, of trying to restore a boat that's been to the bottom. If I could make slow deliberate progress on my meager budget and have it turn into a real boat one day, this would be worth my while. But if a sunk boat is a no go, I need to know before I spend pretty much everything I have.

I can imagine how many people are going to cringe reading these details, but I don't mind doing a lot of work, and I really do sort of love the thing, if that counts for anything.

Hope you can provide me with some good advise.
Thanks very much
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Also, btw, I believe that the inboard diesel is running, but all of the electronics are apparently shot.
 

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Go for it. It's fiberglas so being under water, that's not a problem, just check everything that's attached to the fiberglas.
Back in 1979 during Claudette, our boat rose as high as she could on her lines, filled with water and sunk in the slip. After the engine was pickled, sails washed, lots of cleaning, and cushions and electronics replaced she was good as new.
 

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Glad I found Sailnet
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Be careful. Sunk boats may have a negative value. That is, it may cost you money to dispose of it unless you can find someone "new to the sea (sailing-wise)." to buy it from you! Tell the seller that if he pays you $200, that you'll take it off his hands. Then watch how fast he's pays you to take it.

And slips aren't usually cheap, unless you live far from any city.

Instead, take some time to talk to several marina owners about the neglected boats they have on site. They could hook you up with a seller that has ignored his boat and is tired of paying those slip fees. (And the yard owner will be glad to get someone who pays their bills on time.)

By all means don't let these short paragraphs discourage you. Great idea, try looking around a little first.
 

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Welcome aboard Pan,

That O'day is 20+ years old, It may not be worth the money to fix it up. Someone with more experience will be along to help you.
 

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Think twice

Go for it. It's fiberglas so being under water, that's not a problem, just check everything that's attached to the fiberglas.
Back in 1979 during Claudette... good as new.
I'd have said 'no way' but Johnshasteen has a proven point of view worth consideration. However, if the water penetrated the balsa core, the bulkheads, cabinets, any tanks. And then considering the wiring...me, I'd look elsewhere. How long was it submerged? Let us know how it goes, you may surprise and even impress us with the outcome.
 

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Inboard engine - electrics - not well cared for - has been sunk - visible damage on top of all that... BIG RED FLAG!
 

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Pan:

Most marina's around here in Southern California require the boat to be in some kind of cosmetically acceptable shape to be a liveaboard, or even to get a slip for that matter, and need to have some basic systems functioning like a head, etc. Check with your marina as well to see what their minimum requirements are.

I expect most of the electronics and wiring will need to be replaced, and the rest really cleaned as a minimum. Not sure if you are just looking at water damage or if it sat on the bottom for a while and has all kinds of other matter in it.

Interesting project. If you get it, we would love to see the pictures as you go.
 

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Spam, Food of the Seagods
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I just bought a 1973 Santana 21' to have a winter hobby. No engine, no sails $250 and that may be more than it worth.

The compression post is cracked/split and the 6 keel bolts (Retractable) have that rusty look of metal that crumble in your fingers.

It for fun and in a few years I give it to a friend's grandchildren if they show the effort to take a few sailing/boating courses. Not that I feel it important, but, it show me they willing to spend a few dollars they be more involved with the boat. If this make sense!

I trying to buy a Columbia and it have an Atomic 4 that supposedly worked last time it run 2 years ago. It have the mold/mildew smell down in the cabin. If, I can locate the owner (long story) I will offer $2000 for that boat and again, that may be too much!
 

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I owned a really nice Oday 322, and while it offered outstanding accomodations for its size, it would have been tight to live on. I can't really imagine living on a 272 for any length of time even under the best of cirumstances, much less while it underwent major restorative work. Even if you are good at the numerous skills it would take to restore this boat, and could store it free in your back yard, there is a good chance the cost of materials alone would exceed the market value of a decent similar boat.

My advice to someone looking for a live aboard with a sub $1500 budget for the boat, is to buy a subscription to Crusing World and keep saving your money. As others have pointed out, slips are not really cheap and restoring that boat to any reasonable condition will almost surely cost way more than it is worth.

I think most people that live on their boats do it because they love it and they can afford to, not because it's a cheap living arrangement.
 

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Aeolus II
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Look before you leap!

Before you make a jump into a 20+ year old boat that has been sunk and has a hull crack I think I would have a hard look at the "competition". This is a used boat buyers market. You can probably find a decent, never sunk, boat of the same vintage and length might be found for not too much more $$ and save a bundle on repairs to "make her seaworthy". Also, you need to have a hard look at what money you will be spending to fix and replace. Piece by piece, new hardware is way more expensive than it is when it is installed on a used boat on the market. Don't be penny wise and pound foolish, think of the total cost of repairs as well as the purchase price. And don't worry, there will be plenty of work for you on a good used boat. A boat, after all is a hole in the water to put money and effort.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Couple concerns I would have related to O'Day in specific would be the deck. How long was it sunk? The deck core could absorb a heck of a lot of water. The factory didn't bed anything right, so water could easily get into the core.
Also, if the headliner has a flange to cover the hull/deck joint mold could be growing in there.
 

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Picnic Sailor
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It may and I mean MAY be a good option for you, but there are several things I would look into first.

1) Im going to echo mccary, check out the used boat market thoroughy, there will be several other similar bargains out there, if a bargain fixupperer is what you want, then there may be better propositions than this one.

2) If your still serious, then get a survey done, 'oh but that costs and I don't want to spend too much money, thats why I was looking at this boat'.
Well then walk away if you can't afford the survey then you can't afford to restore the boat. Get a survey done, period.

If you've done the above, and the boat is good value compared to what else is out there......and you know for sure now about the condition of the vessel from the survey and exactly what needs doing.........and you understand the work your taking on and the time/costs necessary and are happy with this commitment....... then by all means go for it.

Please also let us know how you go, what you end up doing and how it turns out....and ask questions!
 

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First, really cheap boats are usually far more costly than their brethren which are in usable, decent shape. If you look at what it will cost you to get that boat in usable shape, and compare it to what it would cost you to buy the same boat in decent condition, the second boat will cost far less in time, sweat equity and money. Most cheap or free boats are very expensive to buy.

That said, I'd recommend you read the Boat Inspection Trip Tips thread I started, since it will give you a way to at least see if the boat is worth exploring further. IMHO, they should be paying you to cart the boat off, not you paying them to buy it.

I'd also highly recommend you read the POST in my signature to help you get the most out of your time here. It has tips on searching sailnet, writing a good post, etc..
 

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Been salvaging boats for 25 years...hurricane alley brings plenty to consider. Not afraid of sunken boats, but you do need to dry them out and make them sound before swimming again. Consider all electronics gone, I'd be real surprised if that engine stays running...but I've been known to pickle an engine. It is difficult to live in a boat that you're working on too...but I suggest you work on the cosmetics outside first so you are presentable to your marina neighbors and then concentrate on all the system inboard. Yes, she will nickle and dime you to death and may not be as cost-savings as you thought. But, I will not ever discourage a person who wishes to live the life of a sailor.....it's the only life for me!
 

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If you are not highly skilled yourself you will spend MUCH more than the boat is worth to put it in good condition. Consider buying the same boat in good condition and saving some money and a lot of effort in the long run.
Alternatively...keep looking....most old, cheap boats have plenty wrong with them to begin with without adding a sinking and all the damage that can do to the list of problems.
 

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A sunk boat is not one you buy - it is one you take off the hands of the pour individual. And even then - many more decent wrecks that do not have the damage done to them as the one you post. A simple Craigslist ad in your area will probably poop up quite a few responses from owners just wanting to get it gone...
 

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Discussion Starter #18
This a great community you've got here. I was thinking I might get one or two replies about this. Thanks very much everybody for all your advise, first of all.

With what you've said in mind, I think what it is is that I may be in love with this model more than this particular boat really. So first of all, I think I'll offer the guy $10 dollars for this one, cause that would be worth it to me even if I just took it out in the inlet and sank it again myself.

I wish I had pictures to show you, but I'd feel kind of funny about taking pictures of somebody else's boat and posting them on the internet. The thing has no name, which I found intriguing. I'd probably call it, "submarine-sandwich." ".20000 leagues under." Or "bottoms down." No.

Anyway, more than likely she and I won't end up 'tying the knot' (Pff... I kill myself!), so if anybody knows someone with a 272 they might want to get rid of for around $5000, put the word out for me. I guess I'm back in the market.

Thanks for the wake-up call.

panamade(@live.com)
 

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Aeolus II
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You didn't say where you are... transporting a boat that size (unless you have a trailer and truck) is expensive. So if we have a region we can give you suggestions.
 

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This a great community you've got here. I was thinking I might get one or two replies about this. Thanks very much everybody for all your advise, first of all.

With what you've said in mind, I think what it is is that I may be in love with this model more than this particular boat really. So first of all, I think I'll offer the guy $10 dollars for this one, cause that would be worth it to me even if I just took it out in the inlet and sank it again myself.

I wish I had pictures to show you, but I'd feel kind of funny about taking pictures of somebody else's boat and posting them on the internet. The thing has no name, which I found intriguing. I'd probably call it, "submarine-sandwich." ".20000 leagues under." Or "bottoms down." No.

Anyway, more than likely she and I won't end up 'tying the knot' (Pff... I kill myself!), so if anybody knows someone with a 272 they might want to get rid of for around $5000, put the word out for me. I guess I'm back in the market.

Thanks for the wake-up call.

panamade(@live.com)
Check ebay, craigslist, sailboatlistings, sailingtexas, yachtworld, etc. You'll find one eventually for the price range you want.
 
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