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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone. I did a search on this, and it seems like every year on SailNet around this time someone asks about this. However, most of those people were asking in general about best time to buy and so on.

I believe that the best time to buy is when you find the right boat at a reasonable price. So with that as a given (for me), I have a question about how to handle my particular situation.

It's now late enough that many boats we might be interested in north of our location are on the hard, winterized, and covered. Many are blocked in by other boats in the yard. So if one of those ends up being "the boat we've been looking for", how do we purchase without taking a big risk ourselves? Obviously we can survey, but a sea trial would likely be very expensive (moving other boats, winterization, cover, etc., plus splashing and hauling). We're desparate for a boat--we could always wait until late winter/early Spring, but I've learned it's asking a lot for the right boat to be available on my perferred timeline. There will always be a boat, but not necessarily THE boat. So if one of these is THE boat, how do we purchase without a ton of risk?

Thanks for your input. I realize this general topic has been covered, but I'm looking for some input on my specific situation, if possible. I don't want to continue looking at boats up north at this time of year, if there's no reasonable (non-risky) path to ownership.

Thanks,
J
 

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Unpaid Intern
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well, I know it's a boat design that meets my needs, and it's one of those on my "list" that I've yet to find a good example of. This is one of those that appears it might be a good example. Of course, I won't know that until we go look at it. That brought up the question for me--so what if I we do look at it and it's in fantastic condition? I mean, what next? I don't really want to be locked in for a 5 month long deal, but then again, I don't want to pass up a great boat. What we'll probably do is go look at it, following a lot of sailingdog's post, and go from there. Sometiimes eliminating the boat makes it easier anyway. We only have a dilemna if the boat is great. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks everyone. All great points and well taken. After reading these posts, other threads, and talking it over, we've decided on a plan (nothing profound, but it's a good one for us). Keep in mind we've been looking for almost 6 months now, have narrowed down our list to a few different models, and have traveled hundreds of miles in varying direction to view a number of examples of each. No luck. So while we're not desparate, there is merit to continuing shopping in case we find "our boat".

So here's our plan: We'll go to look at boats up north if they appear to be worth it. One or two in particular are our top choice models and appear to be in good condition, so it's worth a peek.

- If the boat is not so nice, well then we have no problem! We move on.

- If the boat is decent, and perhaps worth considering, but not great, then we can wait. If she sells to someone else, no huge loss. If she's still around in Spring and we haven't located another boat, perhaps we'll consider it (more convenient for sea trial, etc., and overall evaluation too).

- If the boat's in great condition (like really well-maintained), well then we have this issue of if and how to proceed. But in our experience, the odds of this occurring are very small. But if we don't go look, we won't know. That's just reality.

So that's the plan. The more boats we see, the more likely we are to find what we're looking for. :)
 
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