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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Finally got the boat in the water! And now it is time for us to figure out our fancy brand spanking new Hyde mainsail. She is a beautiful thing I must say. Got it from Judy B and it made us realize just how bad our tissue soft mainsail really was.

Got the battens in, she slid right on, new outhaul worked like a charm (Thanks to all of you), topping lift held her up nicely (again thanks!) and thoughts of practicing reefing came to mind. We have done this on a 32' boat with single line reefing and it is a breeze but our boat has no system yet.

Now mind you our Mac 25 was designed to be "roller reefed" on the boom. In other words if you haven't seen this nightmare, you disconnect a pin at the gooseneck, loosen the main halyard, and by hand twist the boom rolling the sail onto it. Just the thought of doing this in heavy weather sounds terrible. I imagine being beaten at some point by the boom.

But now we have slab reefing, two points thank you, and no hardware to go with it. Seems single line is the way to go for a boat our size but I would like everyone's thoughts.

Also, is there anyway to rig something to be able to use the reefing points until we do something more permanent? Can the clew and tack be tied down somehow? I have two open cleats just below my gooseneck on the mast. Seems I could run 5/16'' line from the cleat up through a ring, down to another cleat in a pinch. But what could be done at the outhaul end? Anything? Or am I stuck with piles more blocks on the boom? Seems there would be a simple fix from the old days so to speak before lazy jacks.

Thanks as always for the ideas. I need to do a post showing all we have done this year on the boat. I don't think a single thing we did didn't get checked here first before we proceeded. :D
 

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Once known as Hartley18
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But now we have slab reefing, two points thank you, and no hardware to go with it. Seems single line is the way to go for a boat our size but I would like everyone's thoughts.
Single-line or two-line is kinda personal preference, depending a lot on the sort of sailing you want to do - although single-line is more complex to set up, so, seeing as how you're a recent convert an' all, I'd think you'd do better starting with 2-line and change if you don't like it. :)

Also, is there anyway to rig something to be able to use the reefing points until we do something more permanent? Can the clew and tack be tied down somehow? I have two open cleats just below my gooseneck on the mast. Seems I could run 5/16'' line from the cleat up through a ring, down to another cleat in a pinch. But what could be done at the outhaul end? Anything? Or am I stuck with piles more blocks on the boom? Seems there would be a simple fix from the old days so to speak before lazy jacks.
I'd suggest tying down the tack just as you've described, but for the outhaul end.. yes, you're going to need to mount a (one) turning block somehow to lead it back to the mast. In the old days they used to mount the blocks externally, but can your boom handle another block in the end (alongside the outhaul)?
 

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Congrats on the new mainsail. I personally like the single line reefing on my 34 but if I’m not mistaken, you most likely will need to run your lines external to your boom which may be easier as a double line. A couple of quick questions. Did Judy put in a Cunningham ring? Is your main a loose foot? If it has a bolt rope, is there a grommet at the foot directly underneath the reef clew? You can easily use your Cunningham hook and line on your new tack. The new clew is a little more complicated and you will need some hardware. As a minimum, you will want to mount a cheek block near the back of boom. That way, the reefing line will act also as an outhaul to given tension and flatten the sail. Just lashing the new clew to the boom won’t flatten the sail. You will need a cleat and a way to pull tension on the reefing line.

You could do a single line system by mounting a second cheek block underneath the new tack and on the same side of the boom as the first block. Then you could use the mast cleat on the opposite side (or route the line aft to the cockpit.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Common guys darn it! Thats two more blocks I gotta figure out how to sneak onto this tiny thing. Hmmm, could I use a double block just aft of the first reef point and run both through that forward? One thing into the boom instead of two after all. Then I guess a cleat (or two) is in order up the boom to secure it.

My boom has nothing internal, it is all on the outside that is why space will become a premium as things are added.

Why does my mind have an image of a velcro strap being used as an outhaul/reef point on race boats instead of a typical outhaul setup. Does anyone else remember seeing that? It was a video as I recall. Likely not applicable here at all of course.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Congrats on the new mainsail. I personally like the single line reefing on my 34 but if I'm not mistaken, you most likely will need to run your lines external to your boom which may be easier as a double line. A couple of quick questions. Did Judy put in a Cunningham ring? Is your main a loose foot? If it has a bolt rope, is there a grommet at the foot directly underneath the reef clew? You can easily use your Cunningham hook and line on your new tack. The new clew is a little more complicated and you will need some hardware. As a minimum, you will want to mount a cheek block near the back of boom. That way, the reefing line will act also as an outhaul to given tension and flatten the sail. Just lashing the new clew to the boom won't flatten the sail. You will need a cleat and a way to pull tension on the reefing line.

You could do a single line system by mounting a second cheek block underneath the new tack and on the same side of the boom as the first block. Then you could use the mast cleat on the opposite side (or route the line aft to the cockpit.)
Thanks George! Cunningham yes (but I have no real hw for that yet either), loose foot, and yep I think that cheek block is going to be on order soon. I was thinking a double to handle booth reefs? I like the idea of going to a second block and up through the "new" tacks and down to a cleat (or back). That would only mean two more installs on the boom. One double at the aft and one double at the gooseneck end. I already have 3 unused cleats now on the boom and at the bottom since the halyards got moved back.

Time to go shopping again!
 

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Once known as Hartley18
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Common guys darn it! Thats two more blocks I gotta figure out how to sneak onto this tiny thing. Hmmm, could I use a double block just aft of the first reef point and run both through that forward? One thing into the boom instead of two after all. Then I guess a cleat (or two) is in order up the boom to secure it.
That'll do it. :)

Depending on the sailing you do, you might be able to get away with a single cheek block for the aft reef point - reason being that it's kinda rare to be reefed down to the first point and then have to move to #2. Most people would drop the main at that point and start the motor.. just sayin'...

My boom has nothing internal, it is all on the outside that is why space will become a premium as things are added.

Why does my mind have an image of a velcro strap being used as an outhaul/reef point on race boats instead of a typical outhaul setup. Does anyone else remember seeing that? It was a video as I recall. Likely not applicable here at all of course.
Most race boats have the turning blocks in the end of the boom. The velcro strap(s) you saw was likely to be wrapped around the boom and acting as a fairlead to keep any external lines from dropping below the boom and snagging something (or someone).
 

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Is your mainsail halyard at the mast or in the cockpit? If it is at the mast then you can rig all of the reefing near the mast too, which is more straightforward.

If your Cunningham is rigged to fit into the cringle using a hook then you can also move it up to the tack reef point to hold the tack in place. Then you don't need a block forward on the boom.

Then you just setup fairly basic jiffy reefing for the clew reef. That is done with a line that goes from the boom up to the cringle, back to a block on the boom, and forward to a cleat near the mast. You want a multi-part purchase along the boom or a boom mounted winch to get the clew tension high enough.
 

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Hey it is 25 footer. 2 pieces of 1/4 inch line, tie down to the boom at the gooseneck making sure it can not slide out on the boom the second should have a loop on the end, push the loop through the reefing point take the line round the boom through the loop and tie off tight to the end of the boom.

If you are worried about the boom thrashing about drop the main tie in the reef and rehoist.

Simple is good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hey it is 25 footer. 2 pieces of 1/4 inch line, tie down to the boom at the gooseneck making sure it can not slide out on the boom the second should have a loop on the end, push the loop through the reefing point take the line round the boom through the loop and tie off tight to the end of the boom.

If you are worried about the boom thrashing about drop the main tie in the reef and rehoist.

Simple is good.
Now this sounds like something that could work! Just so happens the ties that came with the sail look just like that, really long with a loop in one end. I also have tons of 1/4'' line.

We will have to test this as a simple way for now. I will have to come up with somewhere to tie to the end of the boom.

Thanks!
 
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