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HANUMAN
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm starting to shop and these two boats are on my short list.

I'm hoping to grab someones attention who is thinking of selling but not involved with a broker yet.

The draft needs to be near 5 feet.

The CS must have the sugar scoop transom.

The boat must be located someplace between the Chesapeake and Maine, on the East Coast.

Thanks!

Edit: CS 36, typo on the subject line (should not read "S 36" maybe a moderator can correct that?).
 

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Corrected..and a clarification needed.. CS 36T or CS36 Merlin? Both great boats but quite different, and both represented here by various SNers so you should get good feedback.

Of the three IMO the C&C34+ (as you know, a 36 footer) is the 'sexiest' of the trio. If it has the same huge galley sink as the 110/115 that seems a water hog to me. Interesting layout and, for you, a continuation of brand loyalty.

I've always found the CS 34 somewhat awkward looking (talking row-away factor). The house runs a bit too far forward for my eye but I imagine there are benefits below from that. I've not been aboard one myself.

The two 36s both have pretty good reps, I think the Wall designed 36T is one of the most robust fin keel/spade rudder boats every built. Assuming CS maintained quality, the Merlin ought to be faster, but as good a boat. I don't think I've ever met or talked to an unsatisfied CS owner. The Merlin's double aft berth will be an advantage, while it's galley is a bit of a tunnel. I suspect the 36T's near vertical companionway ladder might be a bit of a shin buster but other than that she's beautifully tooled and finished below.

Nice dilemma to have!!
 
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Love C&C boats, own an older one. Balsa cored hull of the 34 kind of scares me off. Sucks because I really like both the 34 and 37. Have since I was on one of the first 37s at the Toronto boat show back in the 80's.
Not sure if it is much of an issue having a cored hull or not, seen what happens to the decks......have a small spot to repair this spring on the cockpit floor where the manual bilge pump is/was.
 

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I think wet hull core is much less an issue than decks, though it does happen. Generally hull penetrations are well known in advance and a good builder will avoid using core in those areas.. and once done, they are rarely modified, moved or added to. Deck hardware is often moved around or added over the years so the odds on compromising the core are higher.

That said, I do know of a Buccaneer 305 that had such a saturated core in the hull that a drilled drain hole ran water for weeks. Apparently the area around some hull ports was not adequately sealed. Would not expect that kind of issue with established brands like C&C or CS.
 

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Sailed on dozens of C&Cs, live in the land of C&C they were built about an hour from me. Never seen a completely dry one.
Back in the day I was through their factory a number of times, part of the reason I like them, I've seen them being built.
I HOPE you are right about the hulls. Beautiful boats, be a shame to see them being scrapped due to moisture.
So much more character than the modern cookie cutter design boats.
 

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HANUMAN
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Discussion Starter #6
I was under the impression that only the 36 Merlin had a step in the transom, but perhaps I'm mistaken.

I spend a lot of time on my mooring so the step transom is important to me.

As for the cored hulls, a thorough survey should find any issues. Those boats were built 20+ years ago so I figure if it ain't happened by now it probably won't.

My current boat is a C&C 30 MKII, my previous boat was a C&C 30 MKI, I must be part Canadian. :)
 

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I was under the impression that only the 36 Merlin had a step in the transom, but perhaps I'm mistaken.
You are correct - in that the CS36T does not have a transom step. But not ALL Merlins do either. It was a change down the production line. Not sure at what hull number.

..... I must be part Canadian. :)
Nothing wrong with that, eh?? ;)
 

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HANUMAN
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Discussion Starter #8
According to sailboatdata.com the Merlins were made to order with a choice of transom.
 

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I wouldn't let a balsa hull scare you away. If they're dry and you don't do something to change that situation it should stay dry. And, if there is some moisture it can be repaired, vacuum bagging has changed the repair industry in a positive way. We like c&c's, they are nice boats and if you can find a Bruckman built boat you've essentially purchased a custom stick built boat. But the cs boats are very good boats to, excellent construction, better then production c&c I believe.
 

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HANUMAN
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Discussion Starter #10
I wouldn't let a balsa hull scare you away. If they're dry and you don't do something to change that situation it should stay dry. And, if there is some moisture it can be repaired, vacuum bagging has changed the repair industry in a positive way. We like c&c's, they are nice boats and if you can find a Bruckman built boat you've essentially purchased a custom stick built boat. But the cs boats are very good boats to, excellent construction, better then production c&c I believe.
Agree about the cored hulls. My 30MKII has a cored hull and it surveyed well.

As for the Bruckman Yachts, unfortunately, I think they might be out of my price range.
 

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Learning the HARD way...
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Here's a Bruckman built C&C that's not going to be out of your range too much, if at all...

1988 C & C Northeast 39 Sail Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com
That spot pictured on the starboard side of the hull would bother me.

I looked at a Pearson 34-2 (a loong time ago) that had a spot that scared me away from balsa cored hulls. That spot looked like this:

A triangular area, with the pictured spot at the apex, between the spot to the keel pegged my moisture meter.
 

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IIRC only a small percentage of later 36 Merlins were built with a sugar scoop..
.. and IIRC it still required climbing the transom to get into the cockpit.
 

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al brazzi
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Corrected..and a clarification needed.. CS 36T or CS36 Merlin? Both great boats but quite different, and both represented here by various SNers so you should get good feedback.

Of the three IMO the C&C34+ (as you know, a 36 footer) is the 'sexiest' of the trio. If it has the same huge galley sink as the 110/115 that seems a water hog to me. Interesting layout and, for you, a continuation of brand loyalty.

I've always found the CS 34 somewhat awkward looking (talking row-away factor). The house runs a bit too far forward for my eye but I imagine there are benefits below from that. I've not been aboard one myself.

The two 36s both have pretty good reps, I think the Wall designed 36T is one of the most robust fin keel/spade rudder boats every built. Assuming CS maintained quality, the Merlin ought to be faster, but as good a boat. I don't think I've ever met or talked to an unsatisfied CS owner. The Merlin's double aft berth will be an advantage, while it's galley is a bit of a tunnel. I suspect the 36T's near vertical companionway ladder might be a bit of a shin buster but other than that she's beautifully tooled and finished below.

Nice dilemma to have!!
You get used to kind of turning sideways to decend, just cant walk down like you would a regular marine stairs. I'm still unleashing all the potential of my 30 a Castro design quite similar the Merlin. You will not find an easier engine access than in my Boat. The bigger one not so much, but that's typical if sail design.
 

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My Merlin is cored about the waterline only, which I think was standard. My transom has steps, but it's pretty narrow, and not what I would call "Sugar Scoop"

All being said, I do like my Merlin very much.
 

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There is more to the Merlin then transom choice.
Keel choice, transom style and to me more importantly the companionway style.
There are two styles.
Single staircase vs. 2 stage stairs with removable engine cover.
I would highly recommend the 2 stage stair set up. It allows for better engine access and opens up the galley.
Finding BOTH the preferable companionway and the Sugar scoop transom is going to be difficult.

Owned both C & C 30 and CS 36T
Worked at the CS Yachts factory building 33's and 36's
Lots of experience with C & C in the 1980's

The CS 36 Traditional is the better boat choice in my biased opinion.
Not even close.
Build quality, design and sailing "personality".
The Castro designed Merlin might look more modern and contemporary but it isn't the boat the "T" is.
However the Westerbeke mounted backwards with a V-Drive transmission and tight working space is a drawback of the "T".

Always had difficulty with the 34, (as mentioned previously in this post) the cabin top and deck look too big for the boat. The foredeck is too small and there are some ergonomic challenges moving around down below.

All good boats but the CS 36 T is the better boat.
 

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HANUMAN
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Discussion Starter #18
Transom boarding has become a 'thing' for me. My boat is on a mooring and I spend 2-3 nights a week in season, schlepping people and loads stuff back and forth. My C&C30 MKII is a pleasure to load and unload with the fold down transom. It would be hard for me to go back to climbing aboard instead of stepping. Not to mention the whole sailing thing.

And I've fallen in love with the aft cabin set up for sleeping. I really want to stay in the C&C family, but the 36 Merlin seems like a good trade off if I can't find the right 34+

Nothing wrong with the Catalinas or Bennies, but to me it's just does not feel the same.
 
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