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Discussion Starter #1
[This was posted to another less active forum, not Sailnet, so my apologies if you have seen this question before.]

I had a 2002 C&C 99 hauled out for a survey today knowing that in December 2012 a survey found a void on the starboard side just below the waterline about 1 foot by 6 feet long which was repaired (the core was found to be dry so epoxy was injected and the entire hull was re-tapped afterwards and found to be good.)

Today, the new surveyor found two voids about 12x18" each to the aft of each side of the saildrive (just ahead of the lift straps.) This was obviously a surprise because of the prior survey and repair work that was done. The voids today were very obvious so we had the original surveyor come back and he believes they were not there when he did the original survey and re-survey after the repair.

I don't know if the issue is sections of dry laminate (never received resin during the vacuum bagging process) or if the resin-ated core area bonding is failing (which would be worse.)

To get straight to the point, have the seller fix it and go forward or walk away (or run away if that's the appropriate response)?

Thanks, Brian
 

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Bristol 45.5 - AiniA
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I would walk unfortunately. You don't want to own a boat that gives you a voice in the back of your head wondering if all of the problems in the hull have been fixed.
 
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I'd walk... if this is a progressive issue, you can fix 'these ones' but others will likely crop up the next time you haul.. how can you know that all the bad spots have been addressed - esp since the currently offending areas 'tapped out OK' last time.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the replies. I'm going to walk, there's just too much risk.

The boat in question was produced the same year as the C&C 121 that had so many problems, and while there isn't any hull cracking on this boat, the root cause seems like it could be the same, especially with the appearance of the new and large voids (there was actually a third void identified around the back-stay chain-plate which I forgot to mention earlier,) maybe 'progressive' as Faster mentioned, will eventually mean the whole hull...eek.

Assuming there was a real issue, if there was a fix implemented, does anyone know which hull numbers/years are the problems?

I can't find that information so unfortunately, that probably means I'll avoid all of them.
 

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EVERYBODY that does resin infusion has some amount of less than perfect results and it is NOT like there making thousands and can afford to chuck a marginal hull and there is really no way to fix it

Even on a CNC machine were everything is very controlled a certain amount of stuff hits the reject bin
 

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I am looking at a 2002 C&C 99.
Found this thread.
Any info on how these are holding up?
Would the bonding issue be revealed on a thermal scan survey, past repairs?
If the issue has not appeared by now, could one assume the bond was good on a particular boat?
 

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I am looking at a 2002 C&C 99.
Found this thread.
Any info on how these are holding up?
Would the bonding issue be revealed on a thermal scan survey, past repairs?
If the issue has not appeared by now, could one assume the bond was good on a particular boat?
Maybe .... what is your risk tolerance per dollar spent ?
 

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I am used to keeping boats very well maintained. I'm not used to undertaking full gelcoat peels. Wondering how wide spread the issue is on this particular build.
Not sure of the years involved but these boats were originally marketed as epoxy hulls. One of the lawsuits involved a switch to polyester without telling anyone or changing their advertising. This can all be found on line.

They did a lot of silly corner cutting when dollars got tight such as factory installed thruster tubes changing from 1/2" thick to 1/4" (exhaust) tubes (on the 115) which tended to fracture over time. Take a look at the solid core copper lightning bonding conductor from the starboard shroud to the fuel tank .... think it's a good idea to run 60,000 amps to a fuel tank ?

I've seen some of these boats that were well built but others I've left wondering what the hell were these people thinking. You need the best surveyor you can find.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Mine hasn't had any delamination issues since our questions from the survey were resolved.

The company that does most of the work on it (which I did not know of or talk to prior to purchasing) has been maintaining it since new. There were a couple delaminated areas under the waterline that were repaired in around 2005, but nothing since. We tap it out each haul out and it always makes me nervous...but so far so good.

I love the boat though.

Brian
 
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