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Can someone tell me what the options are for replacing the flooring in my cabin. Does the wood come pre-stained like that in kits? Please let me know what's involved in the installation.
 

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You can buy veneered teak and holly plywood and cut it to size. Get's pricey. You can also buy regular marine plywood, with a clean veneer (I forget the designation for that) and stain it yourself.

What do you have now and how nice or budget are you looking to make it? If the existing flooring was high quality (not just veneer), it may be restorable.
 

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Can someone tell me what the options are for replacing the flooring in my cabin. Does the wood come pre-stained like that in kits? Please let me know what's involved in the installation.
World Panel Products in Florida and North Carolina make up the floors for boats. They have many choices ranging from teak and holly to mahogany and holly and much more. They have plywood as well as plastic options. Walk into their showroom and you see the floors they make on the floor. I am not connected with them but recognize good work.
 

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Any full service lumber yard should be able to supply teak-and-holly faced plywood. It doesn'tt need to be marine quality ply, you should epoxy the bottoms and edges anyway

If you are not a competent woodworker, you should be able to find a marine-oriented carpenter or even the yard who will cut you a new floor using the original pieces as a pattern.

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
 

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This is a small amount of drift but pertains to replacing the cabin sole.
Many of the newer boats have locking/ interlocking floors/ bilge boards.
does anyone have a line on the locks that are used

Has anyone installed these PYI locks
 

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....It doesn'tt need to be marine quality ply, you should epoxy the bottoms and edges anyway....
This could be true, but it's a bit of a gamble. Marine grade plywood is far more resistant to moisture. Yes, the ends should be epoxied, if not capped, in either case. If one's cabin sole and bilges remain dry, a good quality plywood could be sufficient. If one wanted to insure piece of mind, marine grade is made for a purpose. I've seen floors that were made from stained household plywood that looked pretty nice at first. They didn't hold up too well after a few years, which could have been a factor of how the owner cared for them too.

edit: there are wide disparities in quality of household plywood, as well. I never recall all the nomenclature, but it's easy to look up.
 
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