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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am negotiating a possible purchase of 1969 Cal 2-24 hull #129. The deal sounds good, but I know it will need fitting out. It looks like someone was doing restoration on it and stopped early on, so far the hull looks good, the work done looks good, but the clincher is that the boom is missing. I don't perceive this to be major for me, I have knowledge of aircraft structural methods and know how to work aluminum. I also have a mill and lathe and can fabricate fittings if I have to, even have some big chunks of aluminum laying around. But what I would really like to have is the specs and design of the original boom. Is there anyone who can help me? The owners manual would be awesome! If not anyone who owns one, if you could provide me with some photos and a few dimensions it would go a long way and be much, much appreciated.
 

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One of None
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Don't want to burst your bubble.. but what are they paying you to take the boat off their hands? You can do better.. MUCH better. good luck!

 
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Finding a used boom shouldn't be too difficult, your ability to make bits and pieces will come in handy too.. You don't mention price, and today such boats go very very cheap when they are in good working order, so as Denise alluded to, this had better be one heck of a deal.. Elsewhere on this forum someone picked up a Cal 27-1 of similar vintage and also needing some TLC for a few hundred dollars.
 

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I think you are better off saving your skills for other things. Booms are extruded because of the teardrop profile. You could certainly machine one if you wanted, but it would be much more expensive than buying one. Alternatively you could find a close section of either an old mast or boom, and cut it to length. Then build your own gooseneck.
 

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I am negotiating a possible purchase of 1969 Cal 2-24 hull #129. The deal sounds good, but I know it will need fitting out. It looks like someone was doing restoration on it and stopped early on, so far the hull looks good, the work done looks good, but the clincher is that the boom is missing. I don't perceive this to be major for me, I have knowledge of aircraft structural methods and know how to work aluminum. I also have a mill and lathe and can fabricate fittings if I have to, even have some big chunks of aluminum laying around. But what I would really like to have is the specs and design of the original boom. Is there anyone who can help me? The owners manual would be awesome! If not anyone who owns one, if you could provide me with some photos and a few dimensions it would go a long way and be much, much appreciated.
Basically on a small boat like this, there are three things that basically make a boat have zero or negative value:

1. Rigging
2. engine
3. sails

If it does not have any one of these it essentially has no value. If two of these things are not in good shape it will have negative value. You say it's rigging is missing a boom, so unless it has clean and crisp sails and a good functioning engine then it ought to be free or close to it. A couple of things that might make up for the boom, would be a mint interior, brand new sails still in the plastic, All new gear, like winches and what not that could be sold to recoup some of the cost when you want to get rid of the project. Remember boats are big, so they are expensive to dispose of, unless you can convince someone to buy it from you!

And I will add there have been very few "unfinished restorations" that I have seen that I would say had quality work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
The guy is asking 1500.00 but this process is slow and ongoing, I'm doing research as time goes by. He's not in a hurry and neither am I which is to my advantage if I deem it to be too expensive, I'll have plenty of well thought out reasons why. The boat is sitting on a tandem axle trailer that needs some paint/corrosion work (no big deal). If I paid 1.5k, I would probably put another 1.5k (not including my labor) and then have a top notch boat. As for how good a boat it is, I think it is ideal for my situation and where I'm at. Getting it in and out of lakes around here would be a bit of a pain and I would need a dinghy in tow because of the draft. My buddy says a boom is no problem, lots of scrap yards in L.A. should be able to get an original. Oh yeah, there are 6 sails but I have not looked them over yet, waiting on a buddy to go with me that has a lot more hands on experience.

And yes I know, I could do better. If I still lived in Cocoa Beach Florida, I could find someone begging people to take away a boat. But I'm in a new Mexican desert and this guy lives down the road a couple miles, and I have tog et my buddy to haul it out if I do buy because my suv won't do it.

But the really important thing is this. I want to sail, and I want to do it as much as possible, where I am at now, with what I have available in places and resources. Why? Because I think it will greatly increase the chances that I will one day sail where it ought to be done and that I can make that transition with some experience under my belt and some useful knowledge and talent.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well I guess the owner backed out of trying to sell, or maybe I knew too many of the right questions to ask, who knows. It's all good I still have the Tanzer 16 and lots of practicing to do. I found an Albin Express that would be a much much better deal (right here in Albuquerque, go figure). But no response from the seller yet, bet that one is gone.

I guess the trick is to just keep your eyes open and wait once you decide to commit yourself to the whole idea of owning a bigger boat......
 
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