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I dont know about interior damage per se...it's just not there! I'm sure whatever firepit it got thrown into it was just as rotted as yours :)
I'm in Ottawa Canada and "Humpty Dumpty" as I affectionately call her is in a local rural area called Almonte. I get cheap storage in the same field I bought her out of and go out when I have time to work on it. Yes, it'll be a Lot of work from the leaking portlights to the stripped off hardware and mismatched mast ( I bought a new one off a cal 20 complete with stays!) but as It's only ever meant to be something to camp out on the water on the odd weekend in the summer, I'm sure it'll be fine. Was only meant as a bit of a fun project, and I dont really care what it ends up costing me at this point. I'll always have more into the boat than its value, but that is boat ownership.

Seana
 

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Also, looking at your pic its very clear to see the center piece of plywood is contiguous. In the corner where it crosses the bulkhead are each of these plywood cut with a slot? Are the side bulkheads seperate pieces ( they look a different grain) . Details of the original joinery in this area would be VERY helpful especially as strength is through the design. Lots of epoxy needed over the new wood. I'm considering encapsulating it in fiberglass so this never has to be done again.

The only advantage you have over me is having the original to use as a pattern. You're actually going to have to do just as much work as almost all of your wood is going to need to be ripped out to get to the point I am at now.
 

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I did use a short-shaft outboard temporarily a couple of times on our CAL 21, it will work in a pinch, but is FAR from ideal! Even with a long-shaft the prop will sometimes come close to coming out of the water as you move forward to the bow to pick up a mooring or other line handling tasks. At hull speed the short-shaft will be deep enough usually, but at slower speeds the transom rises enough that without having everyone sit near the aft end of the cockpit, you will barely get the lower unit and prop deep enough. A 20-inch (long-shaft) is definitely needed, a 25" Extra-longshaft is not really needed, but would nearly always prevent the prop from coming out of the water, Still I'd have confidence in the 20" as long-enough (standard, or short-shaft is 15"). We started out in 1970 with a British Seagull "long-shaft" SILVER-CENTURY (about 4-5HP) model that actually had a 22" shaft. Replaced in 1981 with a 20" shaft Johnson 4.5hp which worked fine 99.9% of the time. Replaced that (after overheating damage) with a Johnson 4 DLX with the 20" shaft (4DLX was really same as the 4.5 HP, just slightly less HP). When we sold our CAL 21 in 2008 that 4DLX was still running fine, but new owner ultimately moved up to a 6hp. I wouldn't put more than a 6 HP on a CAL 21, more HP really won't push her any faster (and I'm not sure how much faster a 6 would be than the 4.5 we had, but the extra "oomph" would be good in reserve). Incidently, I didn't notice that the owner of that CAL 21 with the short-shaft outboard replaced the decals at some time, that is a 6hp or 7.5, maybe an 8hp.. but NOT a 9.9 <GRIN!>.

In the picture of the top of the keel well: the brass plates on each side were added by my Dad to better secure the bushings for our modified keel locking bolt. Original fiberglass bosses (reeforcements) had sheared off many years prior when we hit a rock with the keel. New locking bolt was 1/4" brass and designed to shear on impact, unlike the original 5/8" stainless bolt (or even hte 5/8" monel bolt that we replaced the ss one with. The Monel bolt bent from the impact. CAL 21 keel really does need to be locked down under sail for proper use and saves some wear and tear on the pivot since keel stays fixed instead of constantly moving against pivot.
 

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Rjohnson,
Thanks for the reply. I bought my Cal 21 for $800.00. Came with orig main sail, jib and a Genoa along with the trailer. The sails are in good condition. My brother was given a 7.5 Ted Williams outboard motor years ago and never used it. I was hoping I could use it on the Cal 21. I am currently resurrecting the motor, rusted gas tank replacing, rebuilding the carb, cleaned out the old gear lube and installing a new impeller. Was hoping I could get by with this motor. I guess once I launch the boat I will find out for sure.
Thanks for posting the pictures of the different length shafts.
Silver
 

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That platform/bench on top of the keel trunk is custom, not stock. Seems to me it would get in the way of using the cabin.
 

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When the wind is blowing strong, the CAL 21 sails pretty good with just the mainsail, or with the main reefed and using a smaller jib (like the 110% "working jib". You may not point as high under just main, but sometimes laying off just a little (and retrimming the set of the sails) make it a lot more comfortable and boat often goes faster when nor over-canvassed! One thing that 38 years of CAL 21 sailing experience can teach you! <GRIN!> Oh, and a boom vang to help flatten the sail will also make it more comfortable in higher winds. With 360# of lead at the bottom of her keel, the CAL 21 is pretty stable, but seems to heel just so far..... then stiffens up. A quick gust may lay her over if she isn't moving fast enough to "shake it off", but letting go the sheets lets her come back upright easily. We did take a couple of water flooding the cockpit knockdowns over the years, but never had her go beyond that. Had water inside after one, but only because it flowed in through a vent that we had on the inside of the cockpit coaming, and even then it wasn't much. I was surprised to find that she heeled less with 2 persons aboard than with one...... surprised because that was even with the second person sitting on leeward side.

The 21 really won't plane, at least not like my current O'DAY Day Sailer (centerboard) but like most Lapworth-designed CALs, she will SURF! WOOOOW!
 

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Well after trying to resurrect the Ted Williams 7.5 hp that was a no go, I bough a Nissan 9.9. Took the boat out on the Lake yesterday. Had good winds and a lot of fun. My question is how do I release the chain from the keel and then how do I reattach it. I sailed for 3 hours, got a sunburn and had the winch in place the whole time.
I'm thinking of using a D shackle to release the chain from the winch, attaching it to the inner side of the opening where keel rises up to.
Anybody have any better ideas?

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My keel Has a stainless hook and a stainless cable to lift it, I leave the cable its like 1/8 maybe slightly bigger attached to the keel and detach it from the winch it has a bulb and slotted connector for the winch. then coil the extra up and attach it to the bulk head to the cabin to keep it outta the way. much easier than trying to find that hook on the keel at the end of the day or weekend as I don't keep the boat in the water I trailer her home with me.
 

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Since I purchased my Cal 21 I have added and changed a few things.
In trying to make it a one man setup, which being 66 I'm not as strong as I used to be but still, the mast is one heavy piece of metal. So I made the front support with 4" box steel 1/8 " wall. This allowed me to install a 12 volt winch to help step the mast. I use a heavy duty tri pod with a roller on top to act as a fulcrum when raising or lowering. The winch has a remote so I can keep the mast from swinging to one side as it raises. The nice thing is the winch has an auto brake when I don't push the button.

The original winch to keep the boat to the trailer was rusted badly, I replaced it.

I also made a stronger more stable rear mast support. The original was bent and wouldn't stay perpendicular to the transom, making it difficult when rolling the mast across it.

I also changed out the motor mount. The original mount, fiberglass, had signs of cracking and I wasn't able to get the motor out of the water. So I installed a Garelick scissor lift and I am able to get the motor out of the water.

I have attached the pictures.
 

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I feel this is the better place to do an introduction since it seems to be the most information on the Cal 21 (also why I bought one). First off I just picked up a 1970 Cal 21. I don't know the hull # nor where to find it. I plan on cleaning mine up and using it a training vessel for my wife and a refresher for myself. I love the small community and the different personalities that every boat seems to have so I was sold immediately after finding mine. Thanks so far all the great information and I look forward to sharing my journey with you all. Cheers!
 
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