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Discussion Starter #1
I bought 'Cal-o-mine' almost 3 years ago and although she has become my home (I now live aboard 4-5 nights a week) it is now time to get her ready to sail ... not that she hasn't (there are laying around here still ... a few mis-adventures we've shared) ...

She was once sailed hard on San Francisco Bay ... and when I purchased her looked like she was put away wet ... bare and dirty and abit abused ... but still sound and sturdy

Over time I've amassed a fair amount of equipment to install .. most of which came used at bargain prices (although NOT safety or electrical) and I've asked quite a number of inane questions here (and intend to ask many more over the next weeks) ... I'm not by any stretch of the imagination a craftsman ... (learning to tie knots was a challenge) and at 64 I am not as agile as I once was ...

But I have just completed my 101 course and moving on to 103 (anyone in the San Francisco area looking - see Mary at Afterguard - probably the Bay area's best secret - just a great instructor and program) ... and want to have her ready for San Francisco's 'summer' (the last week of Sept and 1st week of October) ...

I've moved everything off her and into a storage unit ... haul-out's in about a month ... and so here we start ...

Pressure washed and scrubbed and pressure washed some more to clean away all the flaking old paint ... the V berth looked like this ...



Now my first concern was the overhead ... it is sound structurally ... but is merely a sheet of ply glassed over and painted and after 47 years even after intensive (for me) sanding ... I was not able to smooth it out ... nor did I want to with the glass laid on ... so I have decided to apply a couple of base heavy base coats to try to fill-in and cover the best I can before the final off-white paint is applied ...



The hardware holding on the track topside is next ... I unscrewed the nuts and popped the washers ... no apparent leaks ... I'm planning on 'hiding' them with a varnished grooved wooden fillet and know that I have to rebed the stanchions and the bow pulpit (already ordered butyl tape from Maine Sail) ... so the question is ... SHOULD I also redbed all the thirty-some screws ... I'm not planning on using the spinnaker in the near foreseeable future) ...

As always ... thanks in advance
 

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If the deck is sound and there are no leaks I would say no. whats the worst that could happen, after a few more years it starts to leak and you fix them then or it never leaks and your good.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Overbored ...

Thnks ... that's what I was thinking ... but whenever I think it turns out to be offbase ... as I have little experience with sailing or boats for that matter ...

I am going to put a substantial amount of time and effort as well as money into this project ... rewiring 12V .. 110V .. new standing and running rigging ... perhaps new sails ..

but then ... I don't want to let the 'perfect' get in the way of the 'good enough' .. my problem is that I am not sure what is ... 'good enough'
 

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I sure did all mine as after all that work you dont want to take it apart again ?


And if by some lucky act the plywood is still dry you SURE do NOT want any water going through the sheet :)
 

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And if by some lucky act the plywood is still dry you SURE do NOT want any water going through the sheet :)
I'm with Tommays here. As I understand it, water moves through plywood much faster than end-grain balsa. If you've actually gotten 47 dry years out of those screw holes, bank your winnings and reseat.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
Tommays

Thanks ... I had a gut feeling that I should do them all ... I'll look at it as practice for rebedding the stanchions ... which leads me to my next question ...

backing plates:

ss or starboard ... I've read alot about each and the Cal doesn't have ~any~ so I'll need quite a few ... from a purely ascetic view I'd prefer ss in the v-berth and main cabin ...

also any idea on sizing (overall and thickness) - I have two different patterns for the stanchions - center to center

- 1 7/8" X 1 7/8"

- 2" X 1 7/8"

I need to decide and get those ordered very soon as the buytl tape arrived today ...

One last thing ... I have spent quite abit of time on your blog ... thanks as it has been time both informative and entertaining
 

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Discussion Starter #7
arf145

you're correct ... now that I have decided to put the time and energy and money into refitting her ... I may as well do it correctly

Thanks
 

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One of the things i did was use G10 in place of the core in the stanchion area which was a complete waste of time as it is exactly the same as the balsa :rolleyes:











Over time all the high stress hardware was sinking into the skins and as i kind of get my stainless more or less for free it was and easy pick ;)

14 gauge is a bit thin 12 is Good

I had a pile of 10 gauge scarps so 10 it was and after the first hurricane i cant really regret it :laugher
 

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One of the things i did was use G10 in place of the core in the stanchion area which was a complete waste of time as it is exactly the same as the balsa
What??? Balsa is organic, and comes from a tree. Balsa will decompose if allowed to get wet. G10 is/will not.

I would have suggested G10 as backing plates, instead of making a core out of it. However, since you did, and you already have made SS backing plates, and are using SS screws (presumably), I think that you are good to go.
 

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I own a 28 Cal flushdeck 1967, and sail Lake Superior with it, mine also needed lots of work. but it's well worth it! The vessel can really sail. I've repowered ,with a YMS 8.....Dale
 

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What is the headroom in those flush (more correctly raised) deck Cal 28's? I've always liked them but never been on one.

That whole series of boats from the 20 through the 28 were some of Lapworths best I think. The Cal 20 IMHO is simply THE best 20 footer ever built. The raised deck design gives such a nice amount of deck space on a small boat compared to a trunk cabin.
 

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Regarding hiding the hardware with a wooden filet, I used a similar technique to cover my genoa tracks. I left a few bolts extra long and used sex bolts (sometimes called blind nuts or barrel nuts) to secure the wood trim over the bolts. Had to use several lengths due to the curve, but you might be able to do it with one.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Tommays

Thanks again for the photos ... they DO help ...

I had a good friend who owned his own business in Phoenix and worked extensively in ss ... he was going to make my backing plates so I had mentally left that off my 'to do' list ... unfortunately he went out of business end of last year ... made a few phone calls today ... and it looks as if it'll be gs10 for the backing plates ... at least for now ... but I might have to pop for ss for the two in the V berth ...

eherlihy

As I am probably going to use gs10 ... what thickness and how much overlay outside of the area within the boltholes?

Thanks again in advance

John
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I own a 28 Cal flushdeck 1967, and sail Lake Superior with it, mine also needed lots of work. but it's well worth it! The vessel can really sail. I've repowered ,with a YMS 8.....Dale
Dale

I was raised in Detroit and used to camp out on the shores of Lake Superior not far from the old lighthouse (and fog horn) at Whitefish Point long before the Edmund Fitzgerald found her grave neat there ...

Mine's hull number 181 ... no inboard but an outboard well in the lazerette ... and I prefer her that way ... adds plenty of space aft between the 1/4 berths ... I'd love to see photos of how you have her rigged as I am completely rerigging mine ... both standing and running ... thinking about adding a mast plate as well ... and would like to see any modifications to the cabin as well ... especially if you have done anything to the area around the companionway as I'm thinking of adding a sheet of mahogany to the fiberglass ... odd angle and I'm not sure how to exactly mount it ... been looking for a stove/oven and even found a couple of good Force 10 3 burners for around $350 ... but can't quite imagine how to mount them in the space available and that work is abit over my head ... even with help ...

and if you have a line on a used main that still has some life in it ... I'd be very interested as mine is fairly worn ... went to a loft and drooled over a new main two weeks ago ($1600) ... and have been searching for months everywhere from Bacon to Minnies for one that will work ...

John
 

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Discussion Starter #15
What is the headroom in those flush (more correctly raised) deck Cal 28's? I've always liked them but never been on one.

That whole series of boats from the 20 through the 28 were some of Lapworths best I think. The Cal 20 IMHO is simply THE best 20 footer ever built. The raised deck design gives such a nice amount of deck space on a small boat compared to a trunk cabin.
Sloop John B

Here's an old ad with some specs ...



It list's the headroom at 5' 11" ... and that's right standing in the main cabin under the sliding hatch (see the photo) ...

From what I've read ... she was the precursor to the 40 ... and though I am rather new to sailboats ... she has more interior room and storage than many 30-34's I have seen ... as well as ample room in the V berth ... :D

and when she catches the wind ... even with tired sails and an inexperienced helmsman ... she takes off ...

here's a link to one of the best sites on Cals if you are interested ...

Most I've run into think she's ugly with that raised deck ... but then I worked for Ford for 20 years ... and even when I was driving a company car to work ... my fun car was a '72 454 vette ... only because I couldn't find an old cobra mark I that I could afford back then ... to me she's a classic beauty and from what I've heard and read ... a real thoroughbred ... about the only thing that would bring me more pleasure than bringing her back to 'life' ... will be to learn to let her run .....
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
ok ... back to work ... a couple of warm days in San Francisco (low to mid 70's) so I took some vacation ... continuing in the V berth ... three coats of white primer base coat on the overhead ... worked about as well as expected to partially fill/hide the roughness ... one coat on the hull (where I had installed reflectix for insulation) ... living aboard during the winter has proved what many have said here ... the keys are insulation ... air movement ... low humidity as well as a good heat source ... I might be giving up some insulation but have decided to go with 1/4" decorative cork panel (12" x 24") against the hull ... with a dehumidifier and a good fan ... I'm betting this Vornado i control heater will keep it warm and toasty as it did last year ... the cork should be relatively easy to install and add to the 'look' while giving at least some partial insulation ...



starting to look abit more hospitable ... I'll be interested to see how it looks in the morning light tomorrow ... surely some touch up and hopefully that's all ... but I do have something to resolve that I probably should have before starting to paint ...



the starboard tabbing holding up the plywood deck is cracked/slit along the hull for about 4.5 feet half way down the v-berth ... I hear a PO was rather hefty ... and I have a similar tho' smaller problem in the main cabin behind one of the seats ... from what I have learned ... this should be a rather simple repair ... laying a 4" strip of glass onto both the hull and then the plywood deck ... epoxy ... harden ... then laying a 6" strip over that (3" onto the newly laid strip on the hull - 3" onto the new strip on the deck) ... does this sound correct? ... if not ... suggestions?

Once again ... thanks in advance
 

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the starboard tabbing holding up the plywood deck is cracked/slit along the hull for about 4.5 feet half way down the v-berth ... I hear a PO was rather hefty ... and I have a similar tho' smaller problem in the main cabin behind one of the seats ... from what I have learned ... this should be a rather simple repair ... laying a 4" strip of glass onto both the hull and then the plywood deck ... epoxy ... harden ... then laying a 6" strip over that (3" onto the newly laid strip on the hull - 3" onto the new strip on the deck) ... does this sound correct? ... if not ... suggestions?

Once again ... thanks in advance
:cool: Just be sure to sand the bonding surfaces to clean base material - don't laminate over paint etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Regarding hiding the hardware with a wooden filet, I used a similar technique to cover my genoa tracks. I left a few bolts extra long and used sex bolts (sometimes called blind nuts or barrel nuts) to secure the wood trim over the bolts. Had to use several lengths due to the curve, but you might be able to do it with one.
BigZ

Thanks for the idea ... and the images as I hadn't thought about securing it that way ... and believe that I will
 

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Discussion Starter #19
:cool: Just be sure to sand the bonding surfaces to clean base material - don't laminate over paint etc.
SloopJonB

I never done anything like this before ... got the wood sanded and bare ... after reading this (West System-How to) my big question is how much resin/hardener is required ... again I'm working on about 5' length of tab ...

thanks again as I am planning on doing this Saturday
 

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SloopJonB

I never done anything like this before ... got the wood sanded and bare ... after reading this (West System-How to) my big question is how much resin/hardener is required ... again I'm working on about 5' length of tab ...

thanks again as I am planning on doing this Saturday
A gallon kit should be plenty - you'll probably use any excess before you are done with your restoration. ;) It has a very long shelf life as well. If you find yourself with some old resin that has turned sort of waxy solid, just warm the container in warm water and it will re-liquify. Also, there are cheaper options than West resins out there. I really like System Three epoxy.

If you are using fiberglass mat, be certain you have epoxy compatible mat - the regular stuff has a binder in it that requires styrene to dissolve - styrene is in polyester but not epoxy.

For a small job like that, my preference is to use 10 Oz. fiberglass cloth. It is very easily wetted out, drapes very nicely and makes a neat job. Two layers gives lots of strength.
 
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