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I have read a few different terms for Morgan keels, could someone clarify?
1) Centerboard(retractable) I assume it is as it sounds, I think our '38 West Indies has this.
2) Ballast Keel?
3) And another, I forget the term, but it sounds like some kind of counter weighted keel for windward?(Swing keel?)
Could someone explain the functions and correct any terminology errors?
Thanks for any responses,
I'm new at this!
 

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I am no Morgan Keel expert. However, I do own a Morgan 30 (1971) which has a centerboard. The actual keel in this case is the heavy part below water which keeps the boat upright. My boat has a lead keel which is built in to the finreglass hull. The centerboard is essentially a flat chunk of metal which swings down from a slot in the main keel. It does not contribute much to keeping the boat upright, but gives it more "grip" in the water and so prevents it from drifting to leeward and allows it to "point up" better into the wind when sailing.

The terms "swing keel" and "centerboard" are often used to mean the same thing, though in my mind a swing keel would be the only keel on the boat and would be much larger and heavier than a centerboard.

Stuart
 

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Hi FriedaB


Saw your post about the Morgan Heritage 38 with swing keel.

What have been your experiences with this boat and how did the swing keel work for you?

Was it much hassle with maintenance?

thanks


Nikko
 

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Terms

The terms "swing keel" and "centerboard" are often used to mean the same thing, though in my mind a swing keel would be the only keel on the boat and would be much larger and heavier than a centerboard.

Yep, my swing keel Cal 21 had a cast lead bulb at the end of a long narrow blade. (pivoted into pocket under cockpit. I changed the free-wheeling trailer winch to a worm drive version after it "got away" from me once.) I have seen the thin blade-only centerboard come in both pivoting and sliding flavors. In small boats, they are retracted by hand since they are so light. Centerboards may include a locking mechanism to avoid "self retraction" from buoyancy.

As pointed out, the swing keel is nice for adding balancing moment afloat and low profile when hauled/grounded. (I used a "normal" trailer for the Cal 21). Lateral resistance is also part of the package, as you would get with a plain centerboard. Centerboard boats use something else (like crew placement in a sailing dinghy) for balancing moment.
 
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